Marler Clark Files Salmonella Saintpaul Lawsuit Against Wal-Mart

 

Last update: 11:46 a.m. EDT Aug. 1, 2008

 

Source of Article:  http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/marler-clark-files-salmonella-saintpaul/story.aspx?guid=%7BBBB1E4B6-4411-4292-A477-8D83F76B67B7%7D&dist=hppr

 

CORTEZ, Colo., Aug 01, 2008 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- The first lawsuit stemming from the Salmonella outbreak that has sickened 1,319 people, hospitalized 255 and caused the death of two in 43 states, the District of Columbia and Canada was filed today in the District Court of Montezuma County, Colorado. The complaint was filed on behalf of Delores, Colorado resident Brian Grubbs against Wal-Mart and an unknown supplier, referred to as "John Doe." Mr. Grubbs is represented by Marler Clark, a Seattle law firm dedicated to representing victims of foodborne illness, and by Colorado attorney David Woodruff of Hillyard, Wahlberg, Kudla & Sloane.

The lawsuit states that the Grubbs family purchased raw jalapeno peppers from the Wal-Mart Supercenter in Cortez, Colorado in late June, and that Mr. Grubbs ate them over the next week. He fell ill on July 3, experiencing nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, and diarrhea. Over the next several days, Mr. Grubbs' condition continued to worsen; he lost a great deal of weight, was severely dehydrated, and could not walk without assistance. His wife drove him to the Northern Navajo Medical Center in Shiprock, New Mexico, where he was treated for dehydration and decreased kidney and liver functions. Samples taken at the time later revealed that he was positive for salmonella Saintpaul.

"Consumers believe that retailers like Wal-Mart know the quality and safety of products they sell," said William Marler, the Grubbs' attorney. "Retailers benefit from that trust, and must be held accountable for the products they sell."

The Grubbs family still possessed some of the peppers that Mr. Grubbs had consumed, and provided them to authorities. Tests revealed that the peppers were tainted with salmonella Saintpaul, and provided one of the first reported physical links in the three-month-long search for the source of the outbreak.

Salmonellosis illnesses from the Saintpaul strain began showing up in Texas and New Mexico in late April, and in early June the CDC linked those illnesses to raw tomatoes and issued consumer warnings. Advisories were widened to include foods commonly consumed with tomatoes, such as peppers, cilantro, and onions, then narrowed to raw jalapeno and serrano peppers. On July 30, the FDA confirmed the presence of salmonella Saintpaul at a farm in Mexico, both in irrigation water and on produce. The investigation is continuing. (A full timeline of the outbreak can be found here.)

Salmonella is a bacterium that causes one of the most common intestinal illnesses in the US: salmonellosis infection. It can be present in uncooked or undercooked meat, poultry, eggs, or unpasteurized dairy products, as well as other foods contaminated during harvest, production, or packaging. Symptoms can begin 6 to 72 hours from consumption, and include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and/or vomiting. In most victims, symptoms will lessen over a period of 10 days to 2 weeks, although it may take months for body functions to return to normal. In others, the infection can lead to more severe illnesses such as typhoid fever and bacteremia. There are many strains of the bacterium; salmonella Saintpaul is a fairly common serotype, but the specific subtype, or fingerprint, associated with this outbreak is very rare.

BACKGROUND: Marler Clark has represented thousands of victims of foodborne illness outbreaks since the landmark Jack in the Box E. coli case. The firm's attorneys have litigated high-profile food poisoning cases against such companies as ConAgra, Wendy's, Chili's, Chi-Chi's, and Cargill. Marler Clark currently represents victims of outbreaks traced to ground beef, pot pies, and spinach, as well as other foods. Contact Mary Siceloff at msiceloff@marlerclark.com or (206) 719-4705. For further information visit www.marlerclark.com and www.marlerblog.com.

SOURCE: Marler Clark

Marler Clark
Mary Siceloff, 206-719-4705
msiceloff@marlerclark.com
 

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