Editor: D.H. Kang
Dept. FSHN
Washington State Univ.

8/12/2002
Issue 12

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New Memthods for food safety
08/12. Botulism antidote work forges ahead
08/11. Botulism vaccine created at UCSF
08/10. Triple-action drug battles botulism
08/09. Beating bugs on food surfaces

Interesting Food Safety News

BUG SPREAD BY FARM ANIMALS
August 12, 2002
PA News
Phil Hazlewood
Almost 140,000 people in several areas of Glasgow have, according to this
story, been urged not to drink local supplies after the discovery of
increased levels of the cryptosporidium parasite.
Cryptosporidium parvum is an amoeba-like parasite usually spread by farm
animals.
It causes about 5,000 cases of illness every year in the UK but only a few
are linked with water supplies.
The organism is rarely fatal but can cause severe abdominal pains, vomiting
and diarrhoea which may last several days and sometimes weeks.
Sufferers tend to be older people and children.
The bug thrives in the dung of farm animals and pets and may be washed into
rivers and streams by rain.
The organism can also infect food and be spread from person to person
through poor hygiene.
Cryptosporidium is highly resistant to disinfectant and not deterred by
chlorinated water. But because it is quite large, it can easily be filtered
out of water supplies.
The first confirmed cases of cryptosporidium in tap water in the UK emerged
in 1989. About 500 people were affected by separate outbreaks in Oxfordshire
and North Humberside.
Further cases have been detected since then. The most recent outbreak saw
more than 140 people fall ill in the Grampian region of Scotland earlier
this year.

CONGRESSMAN TELLS COLORADANS: 'OUR FOOD IS STILL SAFE'
August 9, 2002
Meating Place
Dan Murphy
www.meatingplace.com
Editor's note: The following is an opinion piece written by By Rep. Bob
Schaffer
(R-Colo.) that appeared in the Denver Post on Aug. 4.
"No one profits from bad food. In fact, Colorado's economy depends on safe
agriculture products and confident, healthy consumers. That's why we invest
billions toward achieving both.
"The issue of improved food safety has once again found itself on the
political front burner following the recent discovery of a contaminated
batch of hamburger that slipped through the ConAgra Beef plant in Greeley.
The incident caused the illness of at least 30 people.
"The culprit in this case is E. coli 0157:H7. It can be lethal, though it
wasn't this time.
"Routinely, recalls are initiated immediately after a pathogen is confirmed,
allowing producers to capture and gain control of the recalled product
before it reaches consumers. Con-Agra's recall was anything but typical. It
came too late because federal inspectors waited nearly two weeks to alert
the company that E. coli had been detected.
"Once notified, ConAgra promptly, voluntarily recalled all the contaminated
beef, but the delay had already added millions to the company's cost of
doing so and sickened many.
After admitting its delay was a mistake, the federal government then
recommended to ConAgra an additional recall of millions of pounds of meat
that it had not tested at all.
"The government's passive-aggressive behavior has aggravated consumers,
dealing with beef producers who are now unsure about the U.S. Department of
Agriculture's intentions, the status of recall protocols and the future of
red-meat production.
"These ambiguities are far from trivial. The regulatory authority of USDA is
considerable.
Running afoul of the massive bureaucracy exposes a meat packer to criminal
prosecution, product seizure, detention and, perhaps most effective of all,
publicity.
"Far more harsh and unforgiving than the toughest government sanction, the
marketplace brutally punishes any business that puts contaminated product
before a consumer. That's as it should be, and it works.
"It was the market, for example, that handed a virtual corporate death
sentence in 1997 to Nebraska-based Hudson Foods. Contamination prompted the
company to issue the nation's largest recall of ground beef -- 25 million
pounds. A few months later, the company was closed.
"In our quest to make food safer, there are a few things to keep in mind:
First, U.S. beef was, is and will always be safe to eat. The quality gets
better every day. Colorado ranchers lead the nation in the science of
livestock production, providing quality products that satisfy high
expectations of domestic and foreign consumers. Producers rely on the USDA
as much as consumers do.
It's an important agency, and we all want to see it succeed. Anyone who
cares about food safety should be prepared to help make USDA inspections a
higher federal budget priority. The same goes for state inspectors.
Second, the agency should be driven by sound science, not politics. Its Food
Safety Inspection Service should be given the resources and precise
guidelines to upgrade its testing so inspectors can more quickly pinpoint
the sources of pathogens and react with consistency. It needs more money for
training, too.
Third, the industry should initiate implementation of pathogen-killing
procedures.
Several well-researched measures have been proven effective, such as
live-cattle management at feedlots, washing carcasses with steam or acidic
sodium chlorite and irradiation. America's top ag colleges, including CSU,
have studied this to death. If the industry won't lead on this, government
should.
Fourth, consumers are ultimately responsible for food safety. No amount of
regulation and inspection will help anyone who ignores packaging dates,
improperly handles meat, eats it raw, or worse, feeds undercooked product to
their kids.
Fifth, there is no such thing as a "zero risk" standard for any perishable
food.
This is an impossible goal, a hoax perpetrated by four groups of people ?br>those who work for the government, plaintiffs' lawyers, developers who want
to buy their neighbors' ranches and vegetarians offended by others who enjoy
a good steak. There will never be a regulatory body large enough to inspect
every cut of beef, stalk every distributor or police every kitchen.
"If God didn't intend for us to eat animals, He wouldn't have made them out
of meat. He also made us smart enough to figure out how to eat them both
cheaply and safely."

Germ-free 'beamburgers' to be available at State Fair
By JERRY PERKINS
Register Farm Editor
08/08/2002

http://www.dmregister.com/news/stories/c4788996/18909230.html

Visitors to the Iowa State Fair can get a taste of hamburgers that have been irradiated, or passed under an electronic beam, to destroy harmful bacteria.

"Electronic irradiation is one more step in the food-safety chain to assure consumers that their hamburgers are safe and wholesome," said John Mortimer of Dallas Center, manager of the Cattlemen's Beef Quarters Restaurant, which will serve the burgers.

Beef Quarters expects to serve more than 60,000 people during the 11-day fair, which begins today. More than 1,200 cattle-industry volunteers from 70 Iowa counties help operate the restaurant.

Terri Carstensen of Odebolt, production coordinator of the Beef Quarters, said one goal of serving electronically irradiated hamburgers is to make the public and cattle producers aware of the process and the food-safety potential it offers.

"Irradiated ground beef is in the market and offers families an additional choice," Carstensen said.

The hamburger was electronically irradiated at SureBeam in Sioux City to eliminate harmful bacteria such as E. coli, listeria and salmonella.

Nancy Degner, vice president of consumer marketing of the Iowa Beef Industry Council, said research shows that electronic irradiation of beef, sometimes called "cold pasteurization," does not change the meat's flavor, texture or nutritional content.

"We want to serve a nice, juicy hamburger, and we feel much more confident doing that knowing that the harmful bacteria have been eliminated," Degner said.

About 40 Dairy Queens in Minnesota now serve electronically irradiated hamburgers.

OUTBREAKS
08/12. DEATH TOLL IN FOOD POISONING IN UTSUNOMIYA RISES TO 5
08/12. 4 DIE IN E. COLI OUTBREAK AT UTSUNOMIYA HOSPITAL
08/11. CDC REPORTS OUTBREAK OF SALMONELLA SEROTYPE JAVIANA
08/10. Shellfish suspected in 2 Va. deaths
08/09. Candy from Mexico is suspected in 150 lead-poisoning cases
08/09. Country club suspects sabotage in new salmonella cases


Food Safety Daily News
008/12. SUMMER IS OFTEN RIPE FOR FOOD POISONING: HERE ARE SOME HELPF
08/12. MAD COW VICTIM A SASKATOON PODIATRIST: FIRST DEATH IN CANADA
08/12. BUG SPREAD BY FARM ANIMALS
08/12. GERMAN SALMONELLA WARNING AGAINST FRENCH CHEESE
08/12. U.S. BEEF INDUSTRY STATEMENT REGARDING NVCJD CASE FOUND IN C
08/12. TWO ADDITIONAL E. COLI O157:H7 COLORADO CASES CONFIRMED: 22
08/12. CONGRESSMAN TELLS COLORADANS: 'OUR FOOD IS STILL SAFE'
08/11. E. COLI AT OZAUKEE FAIR DRAWS SECOND LAWSUIT: GIRL HOSPITALI
08/11. FOOD AGENCY ISSUES HEALTH WARNING ABOUT SCALLOPS
08/10. US Tests Suggest Cattle Do Not Catch Deer Disease
08/09. CATTLE BREEDERS SCRAMBLE TO REASSURE PUBLIC: DEATH OF SASKAT
08/09. MAD-COW STRAIN HITS CANADA
08/09. Raid continues at Japan's leading meat packer over beef misl
08/09. NCBA says it's time to re-evaluate risks of imported cooked
08/09. Veterinarians are on the front lines in the global food-safe -
08/09. Cholera is less common but does require prevention
08/09. Delaware Bay harvest of oysters can resume
08/09. Russia threatens to resume ban on U.S. poultry
08/09. Chicken prices up as national product banned
08/08. Food safety reform voices growing louder
08/08. Germ-free 'beamburgers' to be available at State Fair
08/08. ConAgra IDs firms that got bad beef
08/08. Warden did not order contaminated meat cooked
08/08. Health officials investigate nursery E.coli cases
08/08. Deer Park graduate at the forefront in food research
08/08. Deadly salmonella strain spreads across the USA
08/08. Some link bacterial peril to antibiotics put in feed
08/07. Drug-resistant salmonella a growing threat -
08/07. Natural antibiotic found in sweat
08/07. WARNINGS ALWAYS COME TOO LATE Aug 7 2002 -
08/07. E.coli screening for nursery children
08/07. ConAgra linked to E. coli death -
08/07. Cheeses off shelf after poisoning scare -
08/07. MAN SUES OVER CRUISE ILLNESSES -
08/07. CHEESECAKE FACTORY RECALLS BAKED GOODS AFTER FINDING LISTERI
08/07. CHICKEN FARMERS OF CANADA SET TO IMPLEMENT ON-FARM FOOD SAFE
08/07. 1999 CALIF. ILLNESS SAID POISONING
08/07. New York turkey franks recalled for listeria
08/07. Murray's All-Natural Chicken wins Gold Medal from Tasting In
08/07. Ritz-Carlton sued for hepatitis cases, death

USDA/FDA NEWS
For full information, click on
New Procedures for Plants That Fail Salmonella Tests
Responding to a Food Recall - Teleconference, August 21
Imaging System to Find Contaminants on Food Surfaces
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: August 9, 2002
OPPDE What's New Page: Updated August 12, 2002
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated August 5, 2002
National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods; Nominations for Membership;
Membership Nomination Related Documents
Comment Request; Consumer Handling of Ready-to-Eat Foods
Forum ? Meet the Food Inspection Robots
Machine Vision Sees the Food Contaminants We CanĄ¯t See
OPPDE What's New Page: Updated August 2, 2002

Recall Summary
08/12. Cheeses off shelf after poisoning scare
08/12. Lowes Foods store recalls ground beef
08/12. PREMIER brand SMOKED SALMON CHEESE may contain L monocytogenes
08/12. Undeclared milk in BREAD OF LIFE PIE AND COOKIE COMPANY brand
08/12. IMAGINE FOODS issues allergy alert on undeclared milk protein
08/12. ALLERGY ALERT - Undeclared sulphites in MICSON brand dried potato
08/11. Frito-Lay Issues Voluntary Recall of Corn Chips States Due to Undeclared Soy
08/11. Food Allergy Alert: Rice Fruit Cakes
08/10. New York Firm Has Recalled Pork Product
08/10. Frito-Lay Issues Has Recalled 2¨ų oz. Fritos Corn Chips Aug 9
08/10. Hanmi Has Recalled Dried Sweet Potato Aug 8
08/10. North Carolina Store Recalls Ground Beef Products For Possible E. coli O157:H7
08/10. New York Firm Recalls Pork Product For Possible Listeria Contamination
08/10. Texas Firm Recalls Egg Roll Products For Undeclared Allergens And Incorrect Labels
08/09. Starway Has Recalled Royal Family Food Rice Fruit Cakes Aug 8
08/09. Anhing Corporation Has Recalled Singing Bird brand Bamboo Shoot Strips Aug 8
08/09. Cheesecake Factory Has Recalled Cheesecakes
08/09. Gustafson's Dairy Has Recalled Gustafson Brand Chocolate Break Aug 7
08/08. Tennessee Store Has Recalled Ground Beef Aug 7
08/08. Texas Firm Has Recalled Egg Roll Products Aug 6
08/07. New York turkey franks recalled for listeria
08/07. CHEESECAKE FACTORY RECALLS BAKED GOODS AFTER FINDING LISTERI
08/06. RESER'S RECALLS CHICKEN SALAD
08/05. Ton of Chicken Salad Is Recalled

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