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Internet Journal of Food Saety

2/7
2005
ISSUE:151

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Senators Warn USDA To Justify Canada Mad Cow Rule
(REUTERS)
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns will defend an administration plan to reopen the border to Canadian cattle at a Senate hearing on Thursday, where he will face questions about whether the action will expose the U.S. beef industry to more cases of mad cow disease.The U.S. Agriculture Department plans to allow imports of younger cattle beginning March 7, ending a ban imposed 20 months ago with the first native case of mad cow disease in Canada. Two more cases were reported in January.Besides arguments over beef safety and fears that imports will drive down U.S. cattle prices, U.S. treatment of Canada could set a precedent for other nations to resume purchases of American beef. The first U.S. case of mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), was reported 13 months ago in a Washington state dairy cow.Senate Agriculture Committee chairman Saxby Chambliss said Johanns will be expected ``to give us reasons why'' trade can safely be resumed.``We need to trade with Canada but it has to be on the right basis,'' the Georgia Republican said. ``We can't afford to trade with somebody who is going to continue to have BSE cases.''The Bush administration sent a team of experts to Canada in late January to assess Canadian safeguards against spread of the fatal cattle disease. People can catch a human version of BSE by eating beef products carrying the infectious prions.Johanns and other USDA officials at the hearing will be prepared to discuss the ongoing review, said a USDA spokeswoman. When USDA announced the review, it said the results ``will be used to determine the appropriate next steps'' for U.S.-Canada beef trade.The Democratic leader on the Agriculture Committee, Tom Harkin of Iowa, says USDA should withdraw the Canada rule. Another committee member, Republican Craig Thomas of Wyoming, said there were ``very strong feelings from most of us we need to change that rule'' because of the two recent mad cow cases.Democrat Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas said she wanted to hear from Johanns about USDA's work to persuade traditional customers for U.S. beef to lift their bans on it.Three U.S. meatpackers -- Tyson Foods Inc., National Beef Packing Co. LLC and Swift & Co. -- have cut beef production partly because Canadian cattle are not available for slaughter. In recent years, Canada shipped about 1 million head annually to the United States, two-thirds for slaughter and the rest for fattening in U.S. feedlots.While meatpackers have filed suit in federal court, seeking full resumption of cattle trade with Canada, the R-Calf United Stockgrowers of America group of U.S. ranchers and feedlot operators has gone to court to keep the border closed. 2-2-05

Special needs school shuts doors after pupils contract E-coli
GRAEME SMITH February 03 2005
Source of Article: http://www.theherald.co.uk/

AN independent special needs school has been closed after two pupils contracted E-coli.The New School at Butterstone, near Dunkeld, Perthshire, closed its doors last weekend after two boy boarders had come down with the infection, it was revealed yesterday.It is understood the boys, who are both from the Lothian area, became ill the previous weekend while they were away from the school and are now recovering at home after treatment in hospital in Edinburgh.
The school has 44 pupils, almost all boarders, aged 11 to 18 and who have learning difficulties which stop them from thriving in mainstream schools.
The two pupils, who live near each other, are the same age and are friends.
The cause of the illness has been formally identified as E-coli 0157, but food and water source checks have so far failed to reveal the origin of the outbreak.
Bill Colley, the headmaster, said the board of governors had decided to close the school while authorities tried to identify the source."Because E-coli can come from so many sources, in trying to find the source they had to consider the school so we decided ? although we didn't need to and they certainly did not ask us to ? we wanted to close the school so we could check everything possible and that has now been done," he said. "Nothing has turned up."He said the school closed at weekends and when the governors learned of the two cases they decided to keep it closed this week as a precaution.
None of the other pupils have taken ill and the school is expected to reopen on Monday.
Mr Colley added: "The two pupils are at home recovering now and we are expecting them back at school in the near future."
A spokesman for NHS Tayside said health officials were undertaking investigations in co-operation with the school and environmental health officers from Perth and Kinross Council in an effort to trace the source of the infection.
Dr Chris McGuigan, consultant in public health medicine, said: "The origin of infection remains unknown and it is important to stress there is no evidence at this stage to link the pupils' illness to foodstuffs, water or any other source at the school.
"Further investigation will be pursued, but it is often the case in outbreaks such as this that it is not possible to pinpoint the source of infection.
"The board of governors made a voluntary decision to close the school while tests are carried out as they believed it prudent to reassure parents that the safety of pupils is an overriding priority."
The New School was founded by Baroness Linklater, who was its executive chairman until last year when she stood down.
Her daughter, Freya, struggled to cope with mainstream schooling and when her husband Magnus Linklater, the journalist, moved to Scotland, Freya became the inspiration and template for the school.
Although it is fee-paying, 75% of the pupils are funded by their local education authorities.
AN independent special needs school has been closed after two pupils contracted E-coli.
The New School at Butterstone, near Dunkeld, Perthshire, closed its doors last weekend after two boy boarders had come down with the infection, it was revealed yesterday.
It is understood the boys, who are both from the Lothian area, became ill the previous weekend while they were away from the school and are now recovering at home after treatment in hospital in Edinburgh.
The school has 44 pupils, almost all boarders, aged 11 to 18 and who have learning difficulties which stop them from thriving in mainstream schools.
The two pupils, who live near each other, are the same age and are friends.
The cause of the illness has been formally identified as E-coli 0157, but food and water source checks have so far failed to reveal the origin of the outbreak.
Bill Colley, the headmaster, said the board of governors had decided to close the school while authorities tried to identify the source.
"Because E-coli can come from so many sources, in trying to find the source they had to consider the school so we decided ? although we didn't need to and they certainly did not ask us to ? we wanted to close the school so we could check everything possible and that has now been done," he said. "Nothing has turned up."
He said the school closed at weekends and when the governors learned of the two cases they decided to keep it closed this week as a precaution.
None of the other pupils have taken ill and the school is expected to reopen on Monday.
Mr Colley added: "The two pupils are at home recovering now and we are expecting them back at school in the near future."
A spokesman for NHS Tayside said health officials were undertaking investigations in co-operation with the school and environmental health officers from Perth and Kinross Council in an effort to trace the source of the infection.
Dr Chris McGuigan, consultant in public health medicine, said: "The origin of infection remains unknown and it is important to stress there is no evidence at this stage to link the pupils' illness to foodstuffs, water or any other source at the school.
"Further investigation will be pursued, but it is often the case in outbreaks such as this that it is not possible to pinpoint the source of infection.
"The board of governors made a voluntary decision to close the school while tests are carried out as they believed it prudent to reassure parents that the safety of pupils is an overriding priority."
The New School was founded by Baroness Linklater, who was its executive chairman until last year when she stood down.
Her daughter, Freya, struggled to cope with mainstream schooling and when her husband Magnus Linklater, the journalist, moved to Scotland, Freya became the inspiration and template for the school.
Although it is fee-paying, 75% of the pupils are funded by their local education authorities.
AN independent special needs school has been closed after two pupils contracted E-coli.
The New School at Butterstone, near Dunkeld, Perthshire, closed its doors last weekend after two boy boarders had come down with the infection, it was revealed yesterday.
It is understood the boys, who are both from the Lothian area, became ill the previous weekend while they were away from the school and are now recovering at home after treatment in hospital in Edinburgh.
The school has 44 pupils, almost all boarders, aged 11 to 18 and who have learning difficulties which stop them from thriving in mainstream schools.
The two pupils, who live near each other, are the same age and are friends.
The cause of the illness has been formally identified as E-coli 0157, but food and water source checks have so far failed to reveal the origin of the outbreak.
Bill Colley, the headmaster, said the board of governors had decided to close the school while authorities tried to identify the source.
"Because E-coli can come from so many sources, in trying to find the source they had to consider the school so we decided ? although we didn't need to and they certainly did not ask us to ? we wanted to close the school so we could check everything possible and that has now been done," he said. "Nothing has turned up."
He said the school closed at weekends and when the governors learned of the two cases they decided to keep it closed this week as a precaution.
None of the other pupils have taken ill and the school is expected to reopen on Monday.
Mr Colley added: "The two pupils are at home recovering now and we are expecting them back at school in the near future."
A spokesman for NHS Tayside said health officials were undertaking investigations in co-operation with the school and environmental health officers from Perth and Kinross Council in an effort to trace the source of the infection.
Dr Chris McGuigan, consultant in public health medicine, said: "The origin of infection remains unknown and it is important to stress there is no evidence at this stage to link the pupils' illness to foodstuffs, water or any other source at the school.
"Further investigation will be pursued, but it is often the case in outbreaks such as this that it is not possible to pinpoint the source of infection.
"The board of governors made a voluntary decision to close the school while tests are carried out as they believed it prudent to reassure parents that the safety of pupils is an overriding priority."
The New School was founded by Baroness Linklater, who was its executive chairman until last year when she stood down.
Her daughter, Freya, struggled to cope with mainstream schooling and when her husband Magnus Linklater, the journalist, moved to Scotland, Freya became the inspiration and template for the school.
Although it is fee-paying, 75% of the pupils are funded by their local education authorities.
AN independent special needs school has been closed after two pupils contracted E-coli.
The New School at Butterstone, near Dunkeld, Perthshire, closed its doors last weekend after two boy boarders had come down with the infection, it was revealed yesterday.
It is understood the boys, who are both from the Lothian area, became ill the previous weekend while they were away from the school and are now recovering at home after treatment in hospital in Edinburgh.
The school has 44 pupils, almost all boarders, aged 11 to 18 and who have learning difficulties which stop them from thriving in mainstream schools.
The two pupils, who live near each other, are the same age and are friends.
The cause of the illness has been formally identified as E-coli 0157, but food and water source checks have so far failed to reveal the origin of the outbreak.
Bill Colley, the headmaster, said the board of governors had decided to close the school while authorities tried to identify the source.
"Because E-coli can come from so many sources, in trying to find the source they had to consider the school so we decided ? although we didn't need to and they certainly did not ask us to ? we wanted to close the school so we could check everything possible and that has now been done," he said. "Nothing has turned up."
He said the school closed at weekends and when the governors learned of the two cases they decided to keep it closed this week as a precaution.
None of the other pupils have taken ill and the school is expected to reopen on Monday.
Mr Colley added: "The two pupils are at home recovering now and we are expecting them back at school in the near future."
A spokesman for NHS Tayside said health officials were undertaking investigations in co-operation with the school and environmental health officers from Perth and Kinross Council in an effort to trace the source of the infection.
Dr Chris McGuigan, consultant in public health medicine, said: "The origin of infection remains unknown and it is important to stress there is no evidence at this stage to link the pupils' illness to foodstuffs, water or any other source at the school.
"Further investigation will be pursued, but it is often the case in outbreaks such as this that it is not possible to pinpoint the source of infection.
"The board of governors made a voluntary decision to close the school while tests are carried out as they believed it prudent to reassure parents that the safety of pupils is an overriding priority."
The New School was founded by Baroness Linklater, who was its executive chairman until last year when she stood down.
Her daughter, Freya, struggled to cope with mainstream schooling and when her husband Magnus Linklater, the journalist, moved to Scotland, Freya became the inspiration and template for the school.
Although it is fee-paying, 75% of the pupils are funded by their local education authorities.
AN independent special needs school has been closed after two pupils contracted E-coli.
The New School at Butterstone, near Dunkeld, Perthshire, closed its doors last weekend after two boy boarders had come down with the infection, it was revealed yesterday.
It is understood the boys, who are both from the Lothian area, became ill the previous weekend while they were away from the school and are now recovering at home after treatment in hospital in Edinburgh.
The school has 44 pupils, almost all boarders, aged 11 to 18 and who have learning difficulties which stop them from thriving in mainstream schools.
The two pupils, who live near each other, are the same age and are friends.
The cause of the illness has been formally identified as E-coli 0157, but food and water source checks have so far failed to reveal the origin of the outbreak.
Bill Colley, the headmaster, said the board of governors had decided to close the school while authorities tried to identify the source.
"Because E-coli can come from so many sources, in trying to find the source they had to consider the school so we decided ? although we didn't need to and they certainly did not ask us to ? we wanted to close the school so we could check everything possible and that has now been done," he said. "Nothing has turned up."
He said the school closed at weekends and when the governors learned of the two cases they decided to keep it closed this week as a precaution.
None of the other pupils have taken ill and the school is expected to reopen on Monday.
Mr Colley added: "The two pupils are at home recovering now and we are expecting them back at school in the near future."
A spokesman for NHS Tayside said health officials were undertaking investigations in co-operation with the school and environmental health officers from Perth and Kinross Council in an effort to trace the source of the infection.
Dr Chris McGuigan, consultant in public health medicine, said: "The origin of infection remains unknown and it is important to stress there is no evidence at this stage to link the pupils' illness to foodstuffs, water or any other source at the school.
"Further investigation will be pursued, but it is often the case in outbreaks such as this that it is not possible to pinpoint the source of infection.
"The board of governors made a voluntary decision to close the school while tests are carried out as they believed it prudent to reassure parents that the safety of pupils is an overriding priority."
The New School was founded by Baroness Linklater, who was its executive chairman until last year when she stood down.
Her daughter, Freya, struggled to cope with mainstream schooling and when her husband Magnus Linklater, the journalist, moved to Scotland, Freya became the inspiration and template for the school.
Although it is fee-paying, 75% of the pupils are funded by their local education authorities.

 

Food Products Association Applauds USDA for 'Sound, Science-Based Response to BSE'
Source of Article: http://biz.yahoo.com/
WASHINGTON, Feb. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- The Food Products Association (FPA) today applauded the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for actions taken to prevent the spread of BSE in U.S. cattle.
"The response to the discovery in 2003 of BSE in North America has been sound and science-based," said Cal Dooley, FPA's President and CEO. "We believe that the interventions and controls developed by the U.S. government and Canada to prevent the spread of BSE in cattle are based on the best science available, and are highly effective in protecting consumers."
On February 3, USDA Secretary Mike Johanns testified at a hearing by the Senate Agriculture Committee on USDA's plan to reopen the border to imports of approved cattle and beef products from Canada."Both USDA and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have focused on measures to prevent the spread of BSE in cattle, such as the ban on ruminant products in cattle feed," Dooley noted. "Coupled with this, USDA has conducted extensive surveillance for BSE in U.S. cattle. To date, more than 200,000 samples have been tested, and all samples have been confirmed as negative. Additionally, the use of specified risk materials (SRMs) and downer cattle in the production of food for human consumption is banned. As USDA moves forward with its plan to reopen our borders to approved cattle and beef products from Canada, these rigorous measures will continue to protect the safety of the U.S. food supply."Dooley stated, "The Administration also should be applauded for its strong efforts to keep all stakeholders -- particularly consumers -- informed on this issue. The proactive efforts by USDA and FDA to keep consumers fully informed have been instrumental in maintaining a high level of consumer confidence -- in the United States and around the world -- in the safety of our nation's food supply."The Food Products Association -- formerly the National Food Processors Association -- is the largest trade association representing the food and beverage industry in the United States and worldwide, serving as the industry's voice on scientific and public policy issues involving food safety, food security, nutrition, technical and regulatory matters, consumer affairs and international trade. Source: Food Products Association

Adopting Food Safety Standards Can Open Markets in Poor Countries 02/03/05 8:45 Source of Article: http://www.news.farmpage.com
OMAHA (DTN) -- Developing countries faced with rising sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) standards in their export markets can improve their market access by adopting a proactive approach to food safety, agricultural health and trade, according to a new World Bank report. At the same time, high-income countries should reorient assistance flows to developing countries to help them build the capacity to effectively manage food safety and agricultural health and safety risks, says the report, "Food Safety and Agricultural Health Standards: Challenges and Opportunities for Developing Country Exports."
SPS standards have been used by some countries as barriers to trade, but developing countries should see them as potential catalysts for modernizing their export supply and regulatory systems and adopting safer and more sustainable production and processing systems, a senior World Bank official said in Washington February 2.The report noted that a series of well-publicized adverse events in recent years involving product tampering, inappropriate use of farm inputs, contamination by food-borne pathogens and animal diseases have drawn increased attention to food safety and agricultural health issues around the world. Simultaneously, it said, trends in consumer demand in industrialized countries have elevated food safety and quality over other product considerations. The result has been a "complex, variable and dynamic environment for standards that constitutes a major challenge for developing countries," it said. The report reflects the World Bank's recent "re-engagement" in agriculture, said Kevin Cleaver, the bank's director of agriculture and rural development.

NMA again appeals to be heard in R-CALF suit
by Pete Hisey on 2/3/05 for Meatingplace.com

The National Meat Association responded to R-CALF USA's renewed lawsuit against USDA to force it to keep the Canadian border closed to live cattle by filing a request to intervene in the case. (See R-CALF asks for injunction against Canadian border opening, Meatingplace.com, Feb. 2, 2005.)NMA filed a similar motion last fall, before R-CALF's original suit against the proposed rule was made moot by the adoption of the final rule in late December. R-CALF re-filed its suit in early January and on Tuesday filed for a temporary injunction against implementation of the rule. NMA, in its filing, asked to intervene as both a defendant and a cross-plaintiff, contending that while the border should be reopened as scheduled to live cattle under 30 months of age, it should be closed to beef products from cattle over that age until American slaughterhouses can purchase those same cattle and compete in sales of their meat.
As written, the USDA rule, set to go into effect on March 7, barring legal or congressional action, would allow live cattle over the border as long as they are under 30 months of age. It would also continue to allow products from cattle born after a 1997 feed ban went into effect to be imported, provided that all specified risk materials (SRMs) have been removed.

"R-CALF is exporting American packinghouse jobs to Canadian businesses," said Rosemary Mucklow, NMA's executive director.

AMI Foundation funds four new projects to reduce pathogens in meat products
February 3, 2005
AMI Media Release
http://www.meatami.com/
Board Approves Projects Combating both E. coli and Listeria
The Board of Directors of the American Meat Institute (AMI) Foundation has approved funding for four, new projects that explore methods of reducing the prevalence of pathogens. The projects address the reduction of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes (Lm).
The collaborative project of Washington State University and Lakeside Research is entitled Role of Super-Shedders in Determining Feedlot Pen Prevalence of E. coli O157:H7. The goal of the project is to determine that isuper-shedderi cattle are responsible for increased levels and spread of O157 in the feedlot.
The Kansas State University project, Elimination of E. coli O157:H7 and
Salmonella spp. on Beef Trimmings Prior to Grinding Using a Controlled Phase
Carbon Dioxide System: Process Validation and Quality Determinations after
Packaging and Retail Display, seeks to validate the effectiveness of
Controlled Phase Carbon Dioxide and determine the mechanism of action for
reducing E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. on beef trimmings used for ground
beef manufacturing.
The two remaining projects work with the usage of ingredients to reduce and eliminate Lm from ready to eat products. Utah State University will investigate the use of the organic acid anion levulinate to control Lm in cured and non-cured RTE meat and poultry products. The project will evaluate the anti-listerial and organoleptic effects of levulinate alone, as well as in combination with the commonly used anti-listerial ingredients, lactate and diacetate. The title of this project is Anti-Listeria Action of Levulinate.
The final project will be conducted by the University of Wisconsin and will also address the issue of Lm and ready to eat meat and poultry products. Controlling Listeria monocytogenes on Ready-to-Eat Meat and Poultry Products using Food-Approved Antimicrobials, will use both individually and in combination sorbate, benzoate and propionate salts to prevent growth of Lm in uncured turkey and bologna.
AMIF funds research that focuses on controlling Lm on ready-to-eat (RTE) meat
and poultry products, Escherichia coli O157:H7 in fresh beef products and
Salmonella in meat and poultry products. For more information on the AMI
Foundation, visit http://www.amif.org

Chemical safety - food contaminants
February 3, 2005
European Commission
Acrylamide Information Base of Research Activities in the EU: Updated at here

Egg Allergy
Wed Feb 2, 7:00 PM ET
KidsHealth.org
Source of Article: http://news.yahoo.com/

The American Egg Board calls it incredible, but for children with an egg allergy, the egg is simply inedible.One of the most common food allergies in infants and young children, egg allergy can pose many challenges for parents. Because eggs are used in many of the foods kids eat - and in many cases they're "hidden" ingredients - an egg allergy is hard to diagnose. Ultimately, it's up to parents to monitor what their children eat and to consult with the doctor when they have concerns about a possible allergic reaction.
What Is an Egg Allergy?
Food allergies occur when a person's immune system mistakenly believes that something he or she ate is harmful to the body. In an attempt to protect the body, the immune system produces antibodies, called immunoglobulin E (IgE), to that food. Those antibodies then cause mast cells (allergy cells in the body) to release chemicals, one of which is histamine, into the bloodstream. The histamine then acts on a person's eyes, nose, throat, lungs, skin, or gastrointestinal tract and causes the symptoms of the allergic reaction. Future exposure to that same allergen (things like eggs or nuts or pollen that you can be allergic to are known as allergens) will trigger this antibody response again. This means that every time that person eats that particular food, he or she will have an allergic reaction.
An egg allergy usually begins when children are very young, but most outgrow the allergy by age 5. Most children with an egg allergy are allergic to the proteins in egg whites, but some can't tolerate proteins in the yolk. Egg white powder, used in cooking and in baked goods, can also be dangerous to those who have a severe egg allergy.
Signs and Symptoms
People who are allergic to eggs may feel sick just a few minutes after consuming egg proteins or up to a couple of hours later. Most reactions last less than a day and may affect any of three body systems:the skin - in the form of red, itchy, bumpy rashes (hives) or eczema
the gastrointestinal tract - in the form of stomach cramps, diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting the respiratory tract - symptoms can range from a runny nose and sneezing to the triggering of asthma with coughing and wheezing People who have a serious egg allergy may experience anaphylaxis - a severe allergic reaction that causes swelling of the mouth, throat, and airways leading to the lungs, resulting in an inability to breathe. In addition, anaphylaxis causes a dangerous drop in blood pressure, which can make someone dizzy or pass out, and may quickly lead to shock. For people who are especially sensitive to eggs, even egg fumes or getting egg on the skin can cause an anaphylactic reaction, so eggs should be kept out of the home completely.
Diagnosing an Egg Allergy
There are no foolproof tests for an egg allergy. Diagnosis is done through a process of elimination, in which avoidance of any foods made with eggs is crucial. If a child has the same reaction every time he or she eats eggs, diagnosis may be simple. But most egg-allergic people react to egg proteins within other foods, making the diagnosis more complicated.For an accurate diagnosis, an experienced doctor or allergy specialist should be consulted. He or she will perform a physical exam and will ask you and your child questions, such as how often does your child have the reaction, how quickly do symptoms start after eating a particular food, and whether any family members have allergies or conditions like eczema and asthma.If the doctor suspects an egg allergy he or she will probably perform skin testing, in which a diluted extract of egg is placed on the forearm or back and the skin is scratched or pricked with a needle. If swelling or redness occurs, this is considered an allergic reaction.It's important that your child stop taking antiallergy medications (such as over-the-counter antihistamines) 2 to 3 days before a skin test because they can interfere with the results. Most cold medications, as well as some antidepressants, can also affect skin testing. Check with the allergist's office if you're unsure about what medications need to be stopped and for how long. Some doctors may also take a blood sample and send it to a lab where it will be mixed with some of the suspected allergen and checked for IgE antibodies. You may hear a doctor refer to this type of test as a RAST test (or radioallergosorbent test).Doctors may also use an elimination diet, during which the eggs and egg products are completely removed from the child's diet for 1 to 2 weeks. If the symptoms go away, a diagnosis of egg allergy can be presumed, especially if symptoms recur upon reintroduction of eggs into the diet. It's important to note that an elimination diet must be strictly monitored and followed if the egg allergy is to be identified.If the results of these tests are still unclear, then in select cases a food challenge may be needed for final diagnosis. For this test, your child might be given gradually increasing amounts of eggs to eat while being watched by the doctor for symptoms. This type of test can only be performed in a clinic or hospital where access to immediate medical care and medications is available, and it should be avoided if your child has experienced an anaphylactic reaction to eggs in the past.
Treating an Egg Allergy
There's no easy way around it - the only way to treat an egg allergy is to eliminate eggs and foods made with eggs from the child's diet. This can be challenging because so many foods are made with eggs and egg derivatives. If your child has an egg allergy, you'll need to read ingredient lists carefully, and everything your child eats must pass the no-eggs test.

Sign up for United's food security webcast and guide: United's food security webcast and guide to federal food safety and security inspections
February 1, 2005
United News Release
After 9/11, protecting the food supply took on new meaning. In the past three years, Congress has passed sweeping bioterrorism legislation and government agencies have issued new regulations to protect the food supply from intentional contamination. Yet, listen to what government leaders are still saying:
"For the life of me, I cannot understand why the terrorists have not attacked our food supply because it is so easy to do." --Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson, December 3, 2004
How secure is your business, and what's your responsibility for complying with new regulations? You can be sure government inspectors and market partners are intent on placing liability with you. Now, United offers produce industry members the tools you need to help understand the threats to your business and protect your interests.
Two-Part Webcast and Guide - One Low Price!
Sign up today for United's two-part webcast February 2-3 for only $250 ($500 for non-members), and receive a copy of our new Guide to Federal Food Safety and Security Inspections at no extra cost.
Webcast Part 1: The Threat of Bioterrorism to the Produce Industry
Broadcast live from the Fresh Produce & Floral Council Luncheon in Los Angeles, California
Wednesday, February 2, 2005
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. EST
Part 1 of our webcast provides an introductory overview of the threat of bioterrorism to the produce industry, and what government and industry are doing to ensure the security of our food supply. In this innovative learning format, internet users across the country will join with a live audience at the Fresh Produce and Floral Council's February meeting in Los Angeles for a simultaneous broadcast and live discussion. United's food security expert Dr. Donna Garren will lead the discussion from Los Angeles, featuring experts from government and the supermarket and restaurant industries, live online.
Featured Speakers:
Bill Pool, Manager, Agricultural Production & Research, Wegmans Food Markets
Dr. Ernie McCullough, Manager, Food Safety Programs, Arby's
Dr. David Acheson, Director of the FDA's Food Safety & Security Initiative
Dr. Donna Garren, Vice President, Scientific & Regulatory Affairs, UFFVA
Webcast Part 2: Complying With the Requirements of FDA's Final Rules
Thursday, February 3, 2005
3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EST
Part 2 of our webcast convenes at the same time the next day to go into detail on what companies must do to comply with the final rules and regulations issued by FDA. New rules on establishment and maintenance of record will be explained directly by the lead author of the FDA rule to ensure your company is in compliance. And, United's outside legal counsel will explain how your company needs to comply with all four of FDA's new regulations under the Bioterrorism Act. Make sure your company is prepared when government comes to inspect your facility and your records!
Featured Speakers:
Dr. Nega Beru, Director of the FDA's Division of Plant Product Safety
David Durkin, Esq., UFFVA Legal Counsel, Olsson, Frank and Weeda, P.C
Dr. Donna Garren, Vice President, Scientific & Regulatory Affairs, UFFVA
BONUS! -- Guide to Federal Food Safety and Security Inspections
All webcast registrants will receive a copy of Unitedí»s new Guide to Federal Food Safety and Security Inspections developed in cooperation with the law firm of Olsson, Frank and Weeda. This Guide will provide a detailed review of the Bioterrorism Act, including legal compliance with the four new regulations associated with the Bioterrorism Act.
How To Register
Register today to participate in the live webcasts from your own office. No travel required! Use your own computer to hear live presentations, view real-time PowerPoint visuals, and ask your own questions online - without ever leaving your desk!
Sign up today for only $250 for both webcasts ($500 for non-United members), and receive the new Guide to Federal Food Safety and Security Inspections at no extra cost. Click here to register online, and follow the simple directions for signing onto the webcasts. Registration price includes access to BOTH webcasts and the Guide; webcasts will not be sold separately, although registrants can participate in either or both sessions.
Caní»t Join the Webcast? Buy the Guide!
United's new Guide to Federal Food Safety and Security Inspections may be purchased separately for $100 ($200 for non-United members) by clicking here. The new Guide will be mailed to you immediately after the webcast on February 3, 2005.
Questions? Please contact United at webcast@uffva.org or call (202) 303-3400.