Comprehensive News List
General Food Safety News/ Outbreak News/ Recall News/ New Methods News/
USDA/FDA
News/ On-Line Slides/ Job Information/ Training Network/
Internet Journal of Food Saety

12/21
2005
ISSUE:191

Sponsors

















Sponsorship Q/A



To subscribe Food HACCP. com Newsletter,

Click here

 

On-Line Slides

 

Internet Journal of Food Saety

 

Contact us

 

MAIN PAGE

 

E-coli outbreak linked to milk sickens 6 Clark Co. kids
December 13, 2005
KGW.com
Antonia Giedwoyn, Jim Parker and Kristina Brenneman
http://www.kgw.com/health/stories/kgw_121305_health_clark_ecoli.32c8d6d.html
VANCOUVER, Wash. -- Clark County Health officials were cited as saying Tuesday morning there are now six children who have been hospitalized with E. coli after drinking unpasteurized milk from a dairy in Cowlitz County.
Dr. Justin Denny with the Clark County Health Dept. was cited as saying the children are between the ages of five and 14, and that three of the children remain hospitalized; two are in intensive care and one is improving.
The county has scheduled a news conference at noon Tuesday to discuss the E.coli outbreak.
Health officials said the six children all drank unpasteurized, or raw, milk consumed from the Dee Creek Dairy in Woodland, Wash., which is the source of the infections.
The story says that the two families, who purchased Dee Creek Dairy seven years ago and sought to turn it into an "ecologically sound" farm, could not be reached for comment. T
Clark County officials also have requested a list of the dairy's customers dating back several weeks to investigate additional cases.
Janet Anderberg, public health adviser with the state Department of Health, was cited as saying there was an E. coli outbreak last year involving three people in Whatcom County tied to raw milk, and in 2003, three people in Yakima County and eight in Skagit County became ill from tainted milk, adding, "No one has died as a result of a raw milk outbreak, but we've had some really sick people."
In Washington state, raw milk sales are legal if the farm is licensed through the state, which requires monthly testing of the milk and inspection of the farm and milk bottling room.
Also, each bottle must contain a warning label stating "WARNING: This product has not been pasteurized and may contain harmful bacteria," in addition to a few other cautionary phrases.
The story says that six dairies in the state are licensed to sell Grade A raw milk, including Dee Creek.

FDA Warns Consumers to Avoid Drinking Raw Milk
Following an outbreak in the state of Washington, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning the public against drinking raw milk because it may contain harmful bacteria that can cause life-threatening illnesses. Raw milk is not treated or pasteurized to remove disease-causing bacteria.

The risk of drinking raw milk was most recently demonstrated in Washington State by an outbreak associated with raw milk containing the bacteria called Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli). To date, eight illness have been reported in Washington state, several of which were in children. Two of the children remain hospitalized. Health authorities have identified locally sold raw milk as a source of the outbreak, and have ordered the unlicensed dairy to shut down.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 300 people in the United States became ill by drinking raw milk or eating cheese made from raw milk in 2001, and nearly 200 became ill from these products in 2002.

Symptoms of E. coli O157:H7 illness include stomach cramps and diarrhea, including bloody diarrhea. E. coli O157:H7 disease sometimes leads to a serious complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which can cause kidney failure. People typically become ill two to five days after eating contaminated food. People who have developed those symptoms after consuming unpasteurized milk should seek immediate medical attention.

Pasteurization is the only effective method for eliminating the bacteria in raw milk and milk products. Pasteurization uses heat applied for a length of time sufficient to destroy harmful bacteria such as E. coli O157:H7 without significantly changing milk's nutritional value. There is no meaningful difference in the nutritional value of pasteurized and unpasteurized milk. Pasteurization can also prevent such contagious diseases as tuberculosis, diphtheria, polio, Q fever, salmonellosis, strep throat, scarlet fever, and typhoid fever that can be spread by bacteria in milk. All milk shipped between states is required, by law, to be pasteurized.

FSIS Reaffirms Statistically Significant Decline in E. coli O157:H7 Rates
December 15, 2005
Source of Article: http://www.meatami.com/Template.cfm?Section=Home&template=PressReleaseDisplay.cfm&PressReleaseID=2755&News=Y

In a letter to the editor of the December Journal of Food Protection, Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) officials reaffirmed previously published numbers showing a dramatic, sustained decrease in the rate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 positive test results on raw ground beef.
In their previous study, FSIS estimated a 54 percent reduction in the rate of E. coli O157:H7 positives for raw ground beef samples from FY2003 to FY2005. Further analysis of the numbers following questions about them proves they are accurate.
In the letter, FSIS said it believes the decrease in the rate of O157:H7 positives likely resulted from policy changes and industry actions, instead of an annual variation in rates.
FSIS personnel also point to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that, for the first time, incidence of E. coli O157:H7 infections fell below the 2010 National Health Objective of once case per 100,000 persons. FSIS indicated that it will continue to monitor new data on the rate of E. coli O157:H7. In addition, the agency is intending to analyze the relationship between the decreases in E. coli O157:H7 on raw ground beef and in human illnesses resulting from the bacteria.

Outbreak Information
12/20. Families may sue Dee Creek over E. coli
12/20. Wales' worst E.coli outbreak over
12/19.
Milk consumers notified of E. coli outbreak
12/19. Yersiniosis, kindergarten - Russia (Novgorod)
12/19. Conroys may face Listeria outbreak charges
12/19. 5 more cases of E. coli linked to dairy's raw milk
12/19. Hilton illness was Norwalk virus
12/19. Health district gives Monte Carlo an all clear
12/19.
Dairy operators question whether raw milk was source of E. c
12/19.
Another 4 children hospitalized with poisoning in Chechnya
12/19.
Listeria bacteria still present at Conroys Smallgoods
12/19.
37 schoolchildren hospitalised in Siberia with food poisonin
12/19.
Hotel Food Poisoning Not an Ongoing Threat
12/16.
Raw milk strikes again
12/15.
District 150 food goes under the microscope
12/15.
Apparent food poisoning strikes workers at Coffeyville cente
12/15.
SA Govt under fire after food poisoning outbreak
12/15.
Tourists show signs of food poisoning
12/15.
[Philippines] Execs to probe food poisoning of teachers
12/14.
E-coli outbreak linked to milk sickens 6 Clark Co. kids
12/14.
Fears of more food poisoning
12/14.
Carteret works quickly on shigellosis outbreak
12/14.
Illness plaguing students was Noro virus
12/14.
Two children hospitalized in Clark County E. coli outbreak
12/13.
Smallgoods listeria strain matches sample
12/13.
Listeriosis, nosocomial - Australia (SA)
12/13.
Food-borne illness snapshot
12/13.
Health officials chasing hotel illness cause
12/12.
Local inspectors first to locate bean sprout problem
12/12. Listeria cases prompt call for menu change
12/12. Source of hepatitis outbreak sought: People who ate at Cafe
12/12. CJD (new var.) Update 2005 (12)
12/12. Illness still a mystery: Total stands at 82 as health offici
12/12.
Deaths start hunt for food poisons
12/12.
Listeria cases under investigatio
12/11. International outbreak of Salmonella Goldcoast infection
12/11.
Illness investigated at downtown hotel
12/11.
Hospital food poisoning outbreak kills two
12/11.
An outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Wales, November 2005
12/11.
When did you know about bug outbreak?
12/11.
E. coli: one case, no lin
12/10. Trichinellosis, human - Russia (Altai)
12/10.
27 suffer food poisoning at labour camp
12/10.
Health Department investigates illness
12/10.
Health officials believe child E. coli cases linked
12/09.
Paralytic shellfish poisoning - El Salvador
12/09.
Fresno County health officials investigate bacteria outbreak
12/09.
Raw egg warning after 40 taken ill

Tyson Lab Network Receives Food Safety Honor
Monday December 19, 8:30 am ET
Source of Article: http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/051219/dam011.html?.v=37
SPRINGDALE, Ark., Dec. 19 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- The Food Safety and Laboratory Services Network of Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSE: TSN - News) has been honored for its work in food quality and safety, company officials reported today.
The network, which includes 18 Tyson laboratories across the country, has received the "Quality Award" presented annually by Food Quality magazine and DuPont Qualicon. The honor "celebrates the ongoing efforts of today's quality assurance/quality control teams in protecting consumer health, consumer satisfaction and safeguarding the North American food supply."
"This award shows just how seriously we take customer satisfaction and food safety," said Dr. Neal Apple, vice president of Lab Services for Tyson Foods. "It's also a credit to the dedication of the 235 Team Members who are part of our lab network, which conducts research as well as millions of food safety tests each year."
The Food Safety and Laboratory Services Network provides technical support to a wide range of areas within Tyson Foods, including live chicken production, sales and marketing, research and development, meat and poultry processing facilities and quality assurance. The flagship of the network is a 25,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art food testing and research laboratory located at the Tyson World Headquarters in Springdale, Arkansas.
"We're continually examining new ways of testing the safety of our chicken, beef and pork products, as well as the application of food safety intervention tools and safe cooking practices," Dr. Apple said. "We're also involved in conducting nutritional analysis for product labeling and work with our research and development group in the creation of safe, new products."
Tyson Foods, Inc., founded in 1935 with headquarters in Springdale, Arkansas, is the world's largest processor and marketer of chicken, beef, and pork, the second-largest food company in the Fortune 500 and a member of the S&P 500. The company produces a wide variety of protein-based and prepared food products, which are marketed under the "Powered by Tyson(TM)" strategy. Tyson is the recognized market leader in the retail and foodservice markets it serves, providing products and service to customers throughout the United States and more than 80 countries. The company has approximately 114,000 Team Members employed at more than 300 facilities and offices in the United States and around the world. Through its Core Values, Code of Conduct and Team Member Bill of Rights, Tyson strives to operate with integrity and trust and is committed to creating value for its shareholders, customers and Team Members. The company also strives to be faith-friendly, provide a safe work environment and serve as stewards of the animals, land and environment entrusted to it.

Rapidchek(TM) Listeria product by an international ready-to-eat food company
December 13, 2005
from a press release
NEWARK, Del. -- Strategic Diagnostics Inc. -- a leading provider of antibody products and analytical test kits for food safety, water quality and environmental markets, today announced that the RapidChek(TM) Listeria testing system has been adopted by a major international manufacturer of ready-to-eat meats and prepared foods, whose brands are well-recognized and trusted in the food industry. SDI believes this customer will represent approximately $150,000 in incremental annual revenue for this specific application and shipments are expected to begin in the current month of December.
This new customer, a multimillion dollar company employing more than 15,000 worldwide, places a strong emphasis on its food safety program. As part of the adoption process, an extensive evaluation was performed by the company's research team, which included the evaluation of two DNA-based test methods in addition to the SDI assay. The RapidChek(TM) Listeria was the method of choice based on technical performance, ease-of-use, cost and fastest time to results, all the components that are viewed as important elements in a test method.
Matt Knight, President and CEO commented, "Continual adoption of our Listeria assay in large food companies validates the superior performance of this customer-defined product in the marketplace. The product continues to deliver the desired benefits and required results that are specified by the customer. The ease-of-use and accuracy of this test system is ideally suited for this application. We believe that our RapidChek(TM) Salmonella launch in the first half of 2006 will receive a similar response among our current and prospective client base."
The SDI RapidChek(TM) Listeria method was developed as an effective, one-step enrichment system for the selective growth, isolation and detection of Listeria species in food and environmental samples. It received AOAC approval in June 2004 and since then has been adopted by a growing number of large ready-to-eat processing plants. Unlike other methods on the market, there is only one media to prepare and one transfer step involved in the process, offering significant savings in terms of labor and cost. In addition to ease-of-use, the RapidChek(TM) test is accurate, sensitive, and detects all Listeria species.
About Strategic Diagnostics Inc.
Strategic Diagnostics Inc. develops, manufactures and markets biotechnology-based detection solutions to a diverse customer base, across multiple industrial and human health markets. By applying its core competency of creating custom antibodies to assay development, the Company produces unique, sophisticated diagnostic testing and reagent systems that are responsive to customer diagnostic and information needs. Customers benefit with quantifiable "return on investment" by reducing time, labor, and/or material costs. All this is accomplished while increasing accuracy, reliability and actionability of essential test results. The Company is focused on sustaining this competitive advantage by leveraging its expertise in immunology, proteomics, bio-luminescence and other bio-reactive technologies to continue its successful customer-focused research and development efforts. Recent innovations in high throughput production of antibodies from genetic antigens will complement the Company's established leadership in commercial and custom antibody production for the Research, Human/Animal Diagnostics, and Pharmaceutical industries, and position the Company for broader participation in the pharmacogenomics market.

Japan reopens market to U.S. beef
by Pete Hisey on 12/12/2005 for Meatingplace.com
Japan this morning reopened its market to U.S. and Canadian beef from cattle 20 months of age or younger. Phil Seng, chief executive of the U.S. Meat Export Federation, said the first shipment will leave from Denver on Saturday, Dec. 17 along with a delegation of U.S. meatpackers.
A technical committee will arrive from Japan tomorrow to inspect authorized export plants, returning to Japan on Christmas Eve to deliver a final report to the Diet, Japan's Senate. However, beef can be shipped at any time provided that all procedures, including age verification and removal of specified risk materials (SRMs), are followed scrupulously.
According to Seng, the meat industry is readying a publicity blitz, with an appreciation luncheon of U.S. tenderloin scheduled in Tokyo next Monday, the 19th, with press, governmental and scientific representatives invited.

Seng predicts that it will take until 2008 to reclaim market share comparable to what the industry enjoyed in 2003, before the market closed. However, USMEF plans to promote 17 cuts of beef, mainly from the chuck and round, to offer a better price message and build demand more quickly. "Remember, we still face a duty of 38.5 percent and the dollar has been up significantly against the yen," Seng said during a press conference this morning. Nearly all business in Japan has involved six or seven beef cuts such as tongue and short ribs.

The beef industry plans to lobby Japan to drop its requirement that imported beef come from animals 20 months old or younger, but Seng said it will be a low-key effort, unlike the high-profile pressure brought to bear on the Japanese over the past year. The strategy is to allow a cooling-off period to gain consumer acceptance, then negotiate an end to age restrictions consistent with OIE standards, which hold that with an enforced feed ban of eight years or more and SRM removal, age is not a factor in beef safety. Rather than attempt to negotiate a 30-month limit, "we're going for the touchdown, not the first down," Seng said.

Seng predicts that Hong Kong will reopen its market soon, followed by Taiwan by the end of January. South Korea, however, will be a harder sell due to resistance from farmers and consumer groups. However, Seng noted that under the agreement with Japan, bone-in cuts are allowed, and he hopes that will set a precedent to allow a fuller set of beef products into these markets.

The initial impact of the agreement will be limited, Seng said. Only about 15 percent of U.S. cattle ready for slaughter qualify for export to Japan. Roughly 10 to 12 percent of the herd has adequate birth records and another 3 to 7 percent will be able to pass a USDA grading test that would guarantee that the animals are under 20 months of age, a scheme agreed to by Japan. Cattle born next year will be more likely to have birth records, as the National Cattlemen's Beef Association rolls out its animal identification program nationally, noted Jim McAdams, NCBA president.

NCBA estimates that the beef industry lost $3.14 billion each year to the closing of the Japanese market from a combination of lost sales and absorption of those sales in the domestic market.

According to Seng, the decision to reopen the market has changed consumer sentiment in Japan. Although some recent polls showed that well over half of Japanese consumers were skeptical about ever buying U.S. beef again, a USMEF poll over the weekend, after it became widely known that the market would reopen today, showed only 25 percent would avoid the imported product.

Cold plasma devices developed to kill food pathogens
By Ahmed ElAmin
Source of Article: http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/news/ng.asp?n=64604-plasma-food-safety-pathogen

15/12/2005 - Two devices that harness the power of cold plasma could be used to wipe out foodborne pathogens in processing plants, according to the inventor.

The devices could help processors meet stepped up regulatory standards on food safety. European consumers have become increasing concerned about food safety. As a result the EU and regulatory authorities in member states have been increasing their regulation of the industry, resulting in more costs and greater public scrutiny of manufacturers' operations. Recalls of products are also costly and impact on the company's brand image.

Cold plasma is a state of matter similar to a chemically and electrically reactive gas. Researchers involved in a University of Wisconsin project announced yesterday they used a cold plasma technique to develop the pathogen killing devices.

"Plasma species interact with inorganic and organic materials and change their structure," stated Frank Denes, an associate professor of biological systems engineering at the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.

In collaboration with Amy Wong, a microbiologist at the Food Research Institute, Denes said they have found that the plasma treatments reduce some bacteria populations by a factor of 1,000 to 100,000.

One device looks like a sandwich-sized block of white ceramic. One side features over 200 circles, arranged in a grid. Each circle houses an electrode, and when the reactor is on, they all work together to produce a constant and uniform flow of plasma. The reactor can be suspended, electrodes pointing downward, above any surface in need of disinfection, such as a moving conveyer belt.

The second device decontaminates water and other fluids. The device looks like a large glass jug that holds about 1 liter, fitted with specialized caps that house the electrical gadgetry needed to produce a plasma, a press release stated.

As liquids swirl inside the reactor, cold plasma inactivates the contaminants. Wong found that within 20 seconds, the reactor inactivates high concentrations of bacteria, killing up to 100,000 colony-forming units per milliliter of liquid.

Although cold plasma technology has been used for various manufacturing processes, Denes's cold plasma reactors are the first to work at atmospheric pressure.

Plasma is considered the fourth state of matter, along with the more familiar forms of solid, liquid and gas. A plasma is a gas with free electrons whizzing about. The electrons, accelerated by an electric or electromagnetic field, collide with gas atoms and molecules, fragmenting them to create reactive agents, such as ions, free radicals and other atomic particles.

According to estimates from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, food-borne pathogens account for 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths in the country each year.

Job Information
12/20. OH-Dayton-QC technician (2nd shift)
12/20. OH-Dayton-QC technician (3rd shift)
12/20. NY-Westchester County-MICROBIOLOGIST/ SENIOR LAB TECHNICIAN
12/20. Southern NJ-QC Technicians
12/19. QA Manager, Supply Chain- Cheese - Boulder, CO
12/19. Quality Control Director - Nashville, IL
12/19. Quality Assurance Weekend Analyst - Columbus, OH
12/19. Quality Assurance Supervisor - GA-Atlanta
12/19. QA Manager - Food Manufacturer - CA-San Francisco
12/16. Q. C. Lab Technician - 2nd/3rd shift - Irving, TX
12/16. Q. C. Workleader - 3rd shift - Irving, TX
12/16. Quality Assurance Manager - San Diego, CA
12/16. CA-Sacramento-Quality Control Manager
12/15. QA Auditor - CA-Los Angeles
12/15. QA/QC Supervisor - Cincinnati, OH
12/14. Quality Assurance / QA Coordinator in Alabama - Birmingham
12/14. PA-Statewide-Red Meat Quality Assurance Manager
12/14. MN-Blaine-Microbiology Lab Technician
12/14. Sanitation Supervisor - Food Processing - AZ-Phoenix
12/14. Quality Specialist - IL-Chicago
12/14. KY-Statewide-Quality Manager -Edible Oils/Dressings/sauces
12/14. Quality Assurance Manager - Tempe, AZ
12/14. Quality Assurance Manager - WA-Tacoma/Olympia
12/14. QUALITY ASSURANCE MANAGER - City of Industry, CA
12/12. Quality Control US-CA-Central Valley
12/12. MN-St. Paul-Microbiology Lab Technician
12/12. QC Tech for Food Industry - Long Island City - Queens, NY
12/12. Manager of Food Safety and QA- (JL10248) - CO-Golden
12/12. Quality Assurance Technician - Fresno, CA
12/12. MA-Chelsea-QC Food Microbiologist--Part-Time!

Recall Information
12/20. [UK] Update on Camembert cheese withdrawal
12/20. [UK] Brands of Camembert cheese withdrawn
12/19. Woodsmoke Provisions Issues Recall on 112 Packages of 4 oz. Premium Smoked Salmon
12/19. [UK] Sainsbury recalls Mild Chicken Curry cans
12/15. Undeclared sesame seed in MARGARETíS ARTISAN FLATBREAD
12/14. [UK] Duck spring rolls recalled
12/14. Sara Lee Food & Beverage Issues Precautionary Recall of Four Products
12/12.
HC brand COOKED SEASONING ANCHOVIES may contain salmonella bacteria
12/12. Missouri Firm Expands Recall of Meat Lunch Makers Products For Possible Listeria Contamination
12/12. Idaho Establishment Recalls Pot Roast Dinners Due To Undeclared Allergen
12/12. [UK] Sainsbury's recall sunflower seeds
12/12. [UK] Walkers withdraws meaty multipack crisps

USDA/FDA Information

General Food Safety news
12/20. [UK] COT workshop: 15 February 2006
12/20.
Waste Management: It About Thyme
12/20.
Penn leaves for Seoul to discuss beef issues
12/20. Cow milk not to blame for gut problems
12/20. BSE almost eradicated in Switzerland
12/20. Disease puts New Mexico game on banned list
12/20.
A colonization factor links Vibrio cholerae environmental su
12/20.
[Tasmania] Cook and eat safely this Xmas
12/20.
N.Z. Doctors Brace for Food-Poisoning Surge as Christmas
12/20.
Think safety when cleaning your freshly killed deer
12/20.
Tyson Lab Network Receives Food Safety Honor
12/20.
Redefining the Moral Responsibilities for Food Safety
12/19. FDA Warns Consumers to Avoid Drinking Raw Milk
12/19.
S. Korea To Start Talks With US On Beef Imports
12/19.
CFIA: Notice to food editors
12/19.
Blezard Valley family questions decision to confiscate beef
12/19.
China aims to improve safe water availability by 2010
12/19.
Nevada court cancels $25.2 M judgment against Reno Hilton
12/19.
Got raw milk?
12/19.
Illness puts tiny turtles in spotlight
12/19.
Traveler's diarrhea
12/18. Inventor's bowl keeps food chilled for 3 hours or more
12/18.
In our view: ban raw milk
12/18.
Raw milk: Local dairy serves up unpasteurized milk
12/18.
Japan-mad cow
12/18.
Food authority helps China manage emerging food risks
12/18.
That tasty food can be dangerous
12/17. Bean sprouts back on menus as salmonella scare recedes
12/17.
Starting Jan. 1, food mfg's have to warn of allergens
12/17.
EFSA starts aspartame study evaluation
12/17.
First U.S. beef shipments arrive in Japan
12/17.
FSIS: E coli counts are down
12/16. Update on applying EU feed and food controls
12/16. MHS to inspect coldstores
12/16. PAHs in supplements survey published
12/16. Metals in supplements survey published
12/16.
South Korea: U.S. beef is safe, negotiations will begin imme
12/16. Pasteurizing fruit? It could help fight Salmonella
12/16. Political row over Listeria response
12/16. Only cooked bean sprouts for area residents and restaurants
12/16.
Irish EPA urges assessments for parasite
12/16.
The "alternative" to pasteurized milk may be illne
12/16.
U.S. and Canadian beef processors have the opportunity
12/16.
House Republicans mounting attack on state food laws
12/16.
Ag department discovers rodent infestation at Lavonia store
12/15.
Food Products Assn: Japan Decision to Lift Ban US Beef
12/15.
APHIS Publishes Final Rule on Japanese Beef Imports
12/15.
FSIS Reaffirms Statistically Significant Decline in E. coli O157:H7
12/15.
South Korea urges stronger inspection measures before resumi
12/15.
[Scotland] Ongoing BSE cases linked to dirty feed bins
12/15.
CWD study needs more participants
12/15.
[WHO] Food Safety
12/15.
Cornell research project to prevent Listeria in RTE Foods
12/15.
Greeks are going off their food
12/15.
Produce safety on the table
12/14. Statement by Ag Secretary Regarding the Opening of the Japanese Market to U.S. Beef
12/14.
Statement by the FDA on the Opening of the Japanese Market to U.S. Beef
12/14.
Rapid alert system for food and feed (RASFF) - introduction
12/14.
Food contact materials - emerging issues
12/14.
Food allergies: education and prevention
12/14.
Ph.D. fellowship for training program in farm-to-table food
12/14.
Fury as E.coli butcher re-open
12/13. Resist cookie dough temptation
12/13.
Those with nothing to hide have no worries
12/13.
Japan And U.S. Lift Restrictions On Beef Imports
12/13.
Japan Supermarkets Cautious of U.S. Beef
12/13.
Canadian Cattlemen's Association commends Japanese decision
12/14.
Food Authority suspends prawning on Sydney Harbour
12/13.
Food safety for students -- the wrong way
12/12. Pathogen Studies Could Result in Safer Produce
12/12.
Japan reopens market to U.S. beef
12/12.
Taiwanese meeting to reappraise U.S. beef
12/12. Japan approves easing ban on Canadian and U.S. beef
12/12. Foreign materials in foods: Course
12/12.
Toxic risk on your plate
12/12.
BC-BSE: Japanese cow
12/12.
Gulf seafood tests show no problems
12/12.
Gut instinct pays dividends on Nobel night
12/12.
Emphasis to inspect fresh products goes against 1906 meat ac
12/12.
Hygiene rules breached at grocers, secret footage shows
12/12.
EU plans food packaging measures after Italy scare
12/12.
Food safety violations net man $2,500 fine
12/12.
Ex-McDonald's employee tests positive for hepatitis A
12/12.
Japan likely to ease restrictions
12/12.
Shops take on roadside fruit and vege traders
12/12.
Bean sprout advisory continues
12/11. Food poisoning victim slams the source
12/11.
Salmonella found in raw milk produced by northern AZ dairy
12/11.
"Food is worse than crack"
12/11.
Japan - mad cow
12/11.
Eat To Live: Dangers in leafy greens
12/11.
Health officials warn against hepatitis A
12/11.
CONAGRA PUTS ALLERGEN WARNING ON GRAIN PRODUCTS
12/11.
Taiwanese meeting to reappraise U.S. beef
12/11.
Chris Harris: possibility Japanese market will reopen to U.S
12/11.
Japanese panel declares U.S. beef safe
12/11.
Researchers may have answer for oyster disease
12/10.
Web site offers information on quality of drinking water
12/10.
Statement from the Food Safety Authority of Ireland
12/10.
Options for treating person with E. coli disease
12/10.
Rotten meat sparks big food scare in Germany
12/10.
Preventing health risks associated with drinking unpasteuriz
12/10.
Surveillance and coordination key to reducing foodborne illn
12/10.
Food hygiene - future hygiene legislation
12/10.
Government should warn about mercury in fish, says CSPI
12/10.
Japan to lift U.S. beef import ban next week-media
12/09. Mall admits to supplying poor drinking water
12/09.
Mad cow -- Japan
12/09.
Backyard butcher pleads guilty to public health, meat inspec
12/09.
Milk that lasts
12/09.
Nebraskan leads food safety service
12/09.
Hurricane brought new urgency to food safety vehicle service
12/09.
Bi-national food agency wants comment on proposed changes
12/09.
Safe to eat? Restaurant inspections may be aired
12/09.
Nashville considers banning food wagons
12/09.
Outing dirty eateries: plan to display public health convict
12/09.
A cockroach for dinner

New Methods for Food Safety
12/20.
Washing and Sanitizing Techniques Aim To Make Produce Safer
12/20.
Scientists find ways to crack bacteria barrier
12/15.
Immunosensors Put the Speed in Rapid Pathogen Detection
12/15. Cold plasma devices developed to kill food pathogens
12/15.
UW Scientists Use Technology to Tackle Food-Borne Illnesses
12/15.
Wireless system monitors food safety via the Internet
12/14.
Rapidchek(TM) Listeria product by an international ready-to-