9/18/2002
Issue 20

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FDA Combats Resistance to Antibiotics
(Washington Post) By Marc Kaufman
Worry Over Germs Means Makers of Animal Drugs Must Assess Human Parallels Concerned that antibiotics used to feed and treat farm animals are contributing to the declining usefulness of antibiotics for people, the Food and Drug Administration has proposed regulations that could limit the use of new animal drugs in the future. The draft "guidance," which has been under development for more than three years, was generally applauded by public health advocates who have been pushing to limit the widespread use of antibiotics on farms. The animal drug industry also welcomed the guidance, in part because it avoided more aggressive solutions to the problem of antibiotic resistance. But the trade group representing the industry called some details of the proposal "unnecessarily stringent" and said it "will make it very difficult for new antibiotic products to be approved." The guidance, released last week, would for the first time require the maker of a proposed animal antibiotic to assess whether it could encourage the growth of disease-causing bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics used in human medicine. If the drug was too similar to an important antibiotic for people, for instance, it could be kept off the market. Currently, the drug maker has to show only that it doesn't leave any dangerous residue in meat."The draft lays out quite vividly that we consider this a very serious issue," said Linda Tollefson, deputy director of the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine. "We have substantial evidence now that resistant pathogens do form in treated animals and can be transmitted to humans through the food supply. From a public health perspective, that risk has to be minimized." The FDA's proposal, which is "guidance to industry" and not a formal rule, will be discussed at an Oct. 2 public hearing. Experts have long known that the overuse of antibiotics by doctors and their patients has reduced the ability of those drugs to cure infections. Giving animals antibiotics in their feed also can cause microbes in the livestock to become resistant to the drugs. Medical researchers have become increasingly concerned that people can become infected with the resistant bacteria by eating or handling meat contaminated with the pathogens.The FDA action is part of a contentious worldwide debate over the long-term use of antibiotics in raising livestock. Public health advocates estimate that 70 percent of antibiotic use in the United States is on the farm -- some to treat sick animals but also to speed the growth of flocks and herds. The European Union has banned some animal antibiotics, and farmers in Denmark, in particular, have stopped using antibiotics for animal growth promotion."The FDA guidance is a good step forward, but it does not seriously address the vast amount of antibiotics already being used on farms," said Margaret Mellon of the Union of Concerned Scientists. "We need much broader action."Bills have been introduced in the Senate by Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and in the House by Rep. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) that would curb the use of animal antibiotics similar to human antibiotics.But the Animal Health Institute (AHI), which represents the companies that make the animal drugs, takes the position that the hazards of animal antibiotics to human medicine are exaggerated by advocates. Richard Carnevale of the AHI said that animal antibiotics are a tiny part of the problem of antibiotic resistance, and that many animal antibiotics are not closely related to those used for humans. He also said antibiotics help farmers produce more healthful and cheaper meat."The data shows decreasing rates of food-borne illness in the country and a downward trend in antibiotic resistance in that food-borne illness in humans," Carnevale said. "To the extent [antibiotics for farm animals] are contributing to the resistance problem, it is small and probably decreasing." There are no official figures on antibiotic production and use in the United States, although Tollefson said that by weight more than half of the nation's antibiotics are used on farms. The FDA has said it wanted the industry to begin collecting that data, and has worked on a rule to require it. But Tollefson said the issue is complicated and will not be addressed immediately. In 2000, the FDA moved to ban two antibiotics used in poultry farming because they are so similar to human drugs. One manufacturer agreed to take its drug off the market, but drug maker Bayer Corp. challenged the move to ban its product, Baytril. That appeal is still in its early stages, and Baytril remains on the market.While the draft guidance to industry is primarily concerned with proposed new drugs, it also proposes a method for reviewing some of the animal antibiotics already on market. Topping the list are virginiamycin, which has been banned for animal use in Europe, and penicillin and tetracycline, whose use on farms has been debated for more than 20 years.

Food Code 2001 Sets New Standard for Food Service Workers
Tuesday September 17, 5:20 am ET
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/020917/dcfns1_1.html
SPRINGFIELD, Va., Sept. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are pleased to release the 2001 edition of the Food Code. This new edition is available from the National Technical Information Service. Ensuring safe food is an important public health priority for our nation. Even though the United States has one of the safest food supplies in the world, foodborne disease poses a continual, significant threat to public health. The CDC estimates that each year foodborne illness causes 76 million sicknesses, 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. The estimated cost of foodborne illness is $10 - 83 billion annually.
The Food Code is revised and updated to represent the most recent and best advice to ensure that food at retail is safe, properly protected and presented. The Food Code is used by the majority of state and local government health departments in the United States.Epidemiological outbreak data repeatedly identify five major risk factors related to employee behaviors and preparation practices in retail and food service establishments as contributing to foodborne illness:
Improper holding temperatures
Inadequate cooking, such as undercooking raw shell eggs
Contaminated equipment
Food from unsafe sources, and
Poor personal hygiene
Food Code 2001 provisions address essentially four areas:
Personnel
Food
Equipment/facilities/supplies
And Compliance and enforcement
The Food Code 2001 is available in a four-color, spiral-bound edition from NTIS, call 1-800-553-6847 or (703) 605-6000, for $49 plus $5 handling fee, no additional charge for shipping; quote order number PB2002-100819KRZ. Most major credit cards accepted. Fax orders to (703) 605-6900.
The National Technical Information Service is the federal government's central source for the sale of scientific, technical, engineering, and related business information produced by or for the U.S. government and complementary material from international sources. Approximately 3 million products are available from NTIS in a variety of formats: electronic download, online access, CD-ROM, magnetic tape, diskette, multimedia, microfiche and paper.

CONSUMERS CONFIDENT IN BEEF
September 16, 2002
Lean Trimmings
Edited by Kiran Kernellu
Research from NPD Group (http://www.npd.com/), a global market information company established in 1967 that services such clients as Dell, General Electric, Intel, Levi Strauss & Co., Mattel, Nike, Sony, Unilever, VF Corporation, Warner Brothers and many others, shows strong consumer confidence in beef safety. About two-thirds of NPD's 600 online panel members surveyed reported that they intended to eat the same number of hamburgers as they had last year, according to a report in Meatingplace.com. Nineteen percent of respondents said they planned to eat fewer hambergers, down 1% from last year's figure of 20%. NPD data showed that consumers
planned to eat steak, hot dogs, and fast food burgers at normal summertime levels, as well. The survey showed that 52% of respondents had a greater awareness of E. coli O157:H7 than they had before the ground beef recall of July. Concern about
the pathogen rose 1% during the period of the ConAgra recall. A study released by the California Olive Industry earlier this month showed that consumers are also aware of safety and quality factors such as processing standards and proper packaging. Fifty-five percent of the respondents preferred food produced in the US.

Food Safety Daily News
09/17. UPDATED OPINION ON THE TSE RISKS OF GELATINE
09/17. OPINION ON THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE RECENT PAPERS ON TRANSMIS
09/17. A CASE OF FATAL ATTRACTIONS: A KISS MAY BE MORE THAN JUST A
09/17. SAY WHAT YOU DO; DO WHAT YOU SAY
09/17. COPPER AND MANGANESE UNBALANCE LINKED WITH vCJD
09/17. WHAT ARE THE ODDS?
09/17. CONSUMERS CONFIDENT IN BEEF
09/17. FEDERAL OFFICIALS PLAY DOWN FOOD TEST RESULTS
09/17. CONSUMERS ADVISED TO AVOID UNPASTEURIZED JUICES
09/17. EU's Food-Safety Watchdog Struggles With Political Trials
09/17. CODEX ALIMENTARIUS COMMISSION: COORDINATING COMMITTEE FOR NO
09/17. SAMPLES OF EGGS, BEEF AND PORK SOLD IN CANADA IN THE PAST TW
09/17. Carcinogens in Some Foods Exceed Zccepted Limits, Study Find
09/17. FDA Combats Resistance to Antibiotics
09/17. CHILD CENTRES STRUGGLE WITH PEANUT ALLERGIES
09/17. BSE - JAPAN (07): SOURCE
09/17. U OF G OPENS NEW FOOD SAFETY INSTITUTE
09/17. Lawmakers Question Beef Recall Delay
09/16. Post speculates FDA ready to green-light sale of meat from c
09/16. FDA publishes document addressing antimicrobial drugs for fo
09/16. Watch What You Eat, Says The CIEH
09/16. Deer meat safe to eat, experts say
09/16. Reclaimed water teeming with parasites
09/16. EU: Result of the Scientific Steering Committee on BSE
09/16. RUSSIA: Ban on Irish beef lifted
09/16. Tainted feed 'source of unexpected BSE'
09/16. French Welcome Changes in BSE Rules
09/16. Listeria Closes French Abattoir
09/16. Learn More About Listeria
09/16. On-farm pathogen testing on the horizon
09/16. Public isn't fed the whole story on meat recall
09/16. Zoo visitors urged to wash hands after petting animals
09/16. Daydots Food Safety Facts And Tips
09/15. Food Safety Authority Report Aims To Reduce Campylobacter Fo
09/15. Does Your Child's Lunch Box Make the Grade?
09/15. Food Code 2001 Sets New Standard for Food Service Workers
09/14. Union urges action to limit unfit meat
09/14. US FDA: FDA and FSIS issue health advisory about Listeria
09/14. 'Head to head' with the EFSA
09/14. GM safety in doubt after honey is tainted
09/13. Review Casts Doubt on Link Between Foods and Cancer
09/13. FDA Offers Guidance on Livestock Antibiotic Safety
09/13. BEWARE OF MAD COW
09/13. BACK TO SCHOOL - PACKING A SAFE AND NUTRITIOUS LUNCH
09/13. Spinal Cord Found In Imported French And German Frozen Beef
09/13. Test for CWD in humans turns up negative
09/13. CWD expert vouches for safety of venison
09/13. Should I heat cold cuts?
09/13. Lawmakers want details of ConAgra meat recall
09/13. Step forward for Europe's food safety authority
09/13. Guilty plea in food tampering case
09/13. Funding boost for FSA Scotland


USDA/FDA NEWS
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated September 17, 2002
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated September 16, 2002
Twenty-Fifth Session of the Codex Committee on Methods of Analysis and Sampling
Codex Alimentarius Commission: Coordinating Committee
Request for Nominations to Serve on Two Subcommittees of FDA's Food Advisory Committee
New Food Chemicals Codex Monographs, Revisions of Certain Food Chemicals Codex
Juice HACCP Regulator Training
Food Canning Establishment Registration, Process Filing and Recordkeeping

Genesis Bioventures Announces USDA Review Of Mad Cow Test
(Dow Jones Newswires)

NEW YORK -- The U.S. government has approved appropriations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture to evaluate new rapid tests for detection of prion-infected animals, including the lateral flow strip test for Mad Cow Disease developed by one of Genesis Bioventures Inc.'s (GBI) investee companies, Prion Developmental Laboratories Inc.In a news release, Genesis said the Prion strip test is an easy-to-use, patents-pending rapid strip test for detecting Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, or Mad Cow Disease. It is similar to a home pregnancy test and will be used on-site using brain tissue, taking less than 20 minutes to complete with "accurate, easily interpreted results."It noted that, to date, there are no rapid tests that can be performed at the slaughterhouse that will ensure that BSE infected cattle don't enter the human food chain. Genesis said Prion and its sister company, Virotek LLC, have developed and are testing a device for the production of the tissue homogenate used in the diagnostic test. The device will enable the user to prepare the sample without additional equipment and provides a greater degree of protection from the potentially contaminated tissue. The device will facilitate movement of the test from centralized reference laboratories to sites in or near the meat processing facility.In February, the USDA reported that it would be testing twice as many cattle for BSE than were tested last year, including deceased cattle from farms . The target for the entire year is 12,500 compared to 5,200 last year, Genesis said.Genesis also said the Prion researchers recently identified a new pair of antibodies for the detection of prions that appears to be more sensitive than the pair now in use. Prion believes that these antibodies will be superior to the original antibody pair and initial research indicates that they will also work in tests for scrapie, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Chronic Wasting disease. Scrapie is a common prion disease found in sheep, while CJD is a human form of prion disease. CWD, although present for decades, has recently made headlines as deer and elk are being infected at an alarming rate across North America, Genesis said.Genesis said it's in late-stage talks with Prion to provide additional funding for the prion disease research. Further funding would result in the company obtaining a controlling equity interest in Prion, it noted. It didn't elaborate.Genesis is a biomedical development company focusing on the development and marketing of novel diagnostics and therapeutics. 9/16/02

OUTBREAKS
09/17. SIX IN METROPOLITAN REGION DIE OF FOOD-BORNE ILLNESS

09/17. COOK ACCUSED OF TRYING TO POISON DINERS

09/17. TWENTY-SEVEN CONTRACT FOOD POISONING IN MONASTERY IN -

09/17. LISTERIOSIS - USA (MULTISTATE)

09/16. Officials investigate listeriosis outbreak

09/16. FDA Warns Pennsylvania of Increase in Listeria

09/16. Hundreds poisoned in China; deaths likely

09/16. Chinese Poisoning Suspect Arrested

09/15. Chinese investigate poisoning

09/15. Central Authorities Call for All Efforts to Save Poisoned Pe

09/14. Poison Causes Food Bug

09/13. Student's sickness not linked to school


Recall Summary
09/17. Stop & Shop Recalls Ground Beef -
09/17. Undeclared peanut protein in QUALITY brand RAJGIRA LADDU
09/16. FDA and FSIS Issue Health Advisory About Listeria
09/16. Turkey Breast Recalled in New York Sep 17
09/16. Golden Tiger Has Recalled frozen beef products Sep 17
09/15. Pennsylvania Firm Has Recalled Ground Beef Sep 17
09/14. California Firm Recalls Beef Products For Undeclared Ingredients
09/14. Pennsylvania Firm Recalls Ground Beef For Possible E. coli O157:H7
09/13. PARADISE and LABONTE brands of HONEY may contain chloramphenicol
09/13. Carbolite Foods Recalls Milk Chocolate Bars Due to Undeclared Almonds
09/13. Carbolite Foods Has Recalled Milk Chocolate Bars Sep 13

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