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Editor: D.H. Kang
Dept. FSHN
Washington State Univ.

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Major Food Safety News

A RAPID AND IMPROVED METHOD FOR THE DETECTION OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS AND VIBRIO VULNIFICUS STRAINS GROWN ON HYDROPHOBIC GRID MEMBRANE FILTERS
June, 2002
Journal of Food Protection: Volume: 65 Number: 6 Page: p1049 -- p1053
S. K. Banerjee; S. Pandian; E. C. Todd; J. M. Farber
http://rosina.catchword.com/vl=22869697/cl=20/nw=1/rpsv/cw/iafp/0362028x/v65
n6/s23/p1049
Publisher: International Association for Food Protection
Abstract: DNA probe-based detection methods were developed and characterized as an alternative to time-consuming and less specific conventional protocols. Digoxigenin-labeled probes were prepared by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the targeted sequences in the specific amplicons generated from genomic DNA. Specific probes with high yields were generated for the detection of the tlh gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and the cth gene of V. vulnificus. Colony (Southern) hybridization analyses were carried out using hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) to allow biotype-specific differentiation of the two species. Eight strains of V. vulnificus and five strains of V.parahaemolyticus, including one standard (ATCC) strain of each biotype, were examined. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized for identification of the target biotypes arranged on the same HGMF and also on a conventional nylon membrane, thereby confirming the specificity of the probes and the comparative usefulness of the HGMFs. The experimental procedure presented here can be completed in 1 day. The protocol was designed specifically to identify the target Vibrio spp. and could potentially be used for the enumeration and differentiation
of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in foods.

INDUSTRY, USDA MEET TO DISCUSS DRAFT NOTICE ON SALMONELLA
July 2, 2002
North American Meat Processors Association
http://www.namp.com/news/nfnews.html#salmonella
NAMP's Executive Vice President Marty Holmes and other meat industry trade
association leaders (AAMP, AMI, EMPA, NCBA, NFPA, NMA, SEMA, SMA) met with USDA last week to discuss how best to use Salmonella performance standard testing within the scope of HACCP and SSOPs. USDA has made it clear, since the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in the Supreme v. USDA case, that it will evaluate microbiological sample results from testing along with other establishment performance data in making regulatory decisions. Under Secretary Elsa Murano, Deputy Under Secretary Merle Pierson, FSIS Acting Administrator Bill Hudnall and Associate Administrator Linda Swacina represented the USDA. There was discussion about how testing, in tandem with other regulatory controls, can improve the safety of meat products, especially ground beef. The discussion included the need to obtain testing results as they are available rather than waiting for the completion of the full sample set, tracking the results of random testing with company testing of a similar sample for an indicator microorganism, consider the advantages of a rolling average set, and following up with suppliers of raw materials. Salmonella is not a good indicator of insanitation because of its very random occurrence. Further, there are geographical and seasonal variations that make it even more random when it is part of a fixed 53-sample plan. Finally, other controls in grinding operations, including time and temperature, are essential to producing safe ground meat. Many companies are themselves doing a lot of testing, and are willing to share their data but currently there is no regulatory incentive, only the apprehension that they will be injured on account of their cooperation. Dr. Murano thanked the group for the frank discussion and said that the draft notice 23-02 is
still under review She invited the attendees, and through them the industry, to continue to provide data and ideas for the further consideration of the National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria in Foods and the NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES.

US TO FUND E.COLI RESEARCH
July 2, 2002
Meat News
http://www.meatnews.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=article&artNum=3479
New USDA funding for 2003 is expected to include money for research into the
meat industry.
The US House Agriculture Appropriations subcommittee has approved the appropriation for USDA for the 2003 financial year, giving full funding to FSIS and allocating more than $4 million to a new study of animal protein industry business models.
The FY2003 appropriations bill also contains an additional $600,000 over last year's appropriated amount of $2.79 million for scientific research onreducing E. coli 0157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in meat products. Of this $400,000 is destined for USDA's Agricultural Research Service and $200,000 for competetive grants through USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service. The American Meat Institute has been lobbying for these funds, which have increased by more than 300 per cent since they were first sought in 1999. Livestock producer groups lobbied for the business study and praised the subcommittee for funding it. The bill will be considered by the full House Appropriations Committee sometime the week of 8 July.
The Senate is expected to begin marking up its version of the FY2003 agriculture appropriations bill sometime in late July.

USDA Urged to Test More Beef For E. coli O157:H7
(justfood.com)
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been urged to test raw beef carcasses and trimmings for the presence of food poisoning bacteria Escherichia coli O157:H7, as it already does for raw ground beef, by consumer groups who filed a petition with USDA yesterday [Tuesday]. The groups, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), the American Public Health Association, Consumer Federation of America, the National Consumers League, and Safe Tables Our Priority (STOP), want testing earlier in the production process, so beef contaminated with the pathogen does not get ground in with uncontaminated beef. Current government testing for E. coli O157:H7 isnt working as well as it could or should,?insisted Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director for CSPI: “USDA should start testing beef carcasses for that deadly bacterium, and any carcasses found to be contaminated should be cleaned and retested. E. coli O157:H7 is a dangerous strain of bacteria that can cause acute illness and even death. Because it poses a significant public health concern, USDA has established a ero tolerance policy for that pathogen and annually tests about 7,000 random samples of raw ground beef prepared in federally inspected plants and in retail stores. 7/3/02

POTENTIAL FOR THE SPREAD OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157, SALMONELLA, AND CAMPYLOBACTER IN THE LAIRAGE ENVIRONMENT AT ABATTOIRS
June, 2002
Journal of Food Protection: Volume: 65 Number: 6 Page: p931 -- p936
A. Small; C.-A. Reid; S. M. Avery; N. Karabasil; C. Crowley; S. Buncic
http://rosina.catchword.com/vl=22869697/cl=20/nw=1/rpsv/cw/iafp/0362028x/v65
n6/s4/p931
Publisher: International Association for Food Protection
Abstract: Prevalences of Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella spp., and Campylobacter spp. were examined in 270 swabs taken from selected sites along the unloading-to-slaughter routes of animal movement in lairages of six commercial abattoirs, three for cattle and three for sheep. The overall prevalences of the pathogens in the respective lairage environments were compared with those for 270 swabs from the pelts of 90 lambs examined in the present study and 270 swabs from the hides of 90 cattle examined in a previous study that were slaughtered at the same abattoirs on the same days.Also, the results obtained were analyzed with the aim of identifying critical points at which animal-environment-animal transfer of the pathogens in lairages occurs. The results showed that (i) the overall prevalences of E. coli O157, Salmonella spp., and Campylobacter spp. were 27.2, 6.1, and 1.1%, respectively, in cattle lairages and 2.2, 1.1, and 5.6%, respectively, in sheep lairages; (ii) the overall prevalences of the three pathogens on cow hides (28.8, 17.7, and 0%, respectively) and sheep pelts (5.5, 7.8, and 0%, respectively) were higher than the overall prevalences in the respective lairage environments; (iii) the most frequently contaminated sites in cattle lairages were holding pen floors (50% of swabs positive for one or more pathogens), entrance gates of stun boxes (27.8% of swabs positive for one or more pathogens), and stun box floors (22.2% of swabs positive for one or more pathogens); (iv) the most frequently contaminated sites in sheep lairages were unloading ramp floors, holding pen floors, and water troughs (33.3, 22.2, and 22.2%, respectively); and (v) overall, cattle lairages and cow hides were more frequently contaminated with the pathogens than were lamb lairages and lamb pelts. Further research is needed to develop strategies for the incorporation of pathogen control in lairages into integrated microbial meat safety systems.

Texas Tech researchers find marine plant reduces E. coli in cattle
By BETSY BLANEY
Associated Press Writer
http://www.reporternews.com/2002/texas/tech0703.html
LUBBOCK (AP) - A seaweed-based product added to cattle feed reduced by 300 percent the occurrence of the sometimes-deadly strain of E. coli, a study by researchers at Texas Tech University shows. Research on the seaweed, ascophyllum nodosum, began 10 years ago. The 300 percent reduction in E. coli 0157:H7 came after cattle received the food additive during the 14 days leading up to their slaughter. "This is one that producers specifically can use to reduce E. coli 0157:H7," Mike De La Zerda, a beef quality manager with the Texas Beef Council, said after a news conference Tuesday where the results were announced. "Not one intervention strategy is the silver bullet, but to have another one in our tool box is definitely a plus for our industry." E. coli is a bacteria that can cause serious illness and sometimes death. Symptoms include chills and bloody diarrhea. It is particularly dangerous for children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems. The brown seaweed used in the study was harvested near Nova Scotia and is most commonly found in the North Atlantic basin. The product name is Tasco and it was developed by a privately owned company based in Nova Scotia, Canada. Researchers also found that Tasco improved the quality of beef and produced a redder color to the meat, adding to its shelf life in stores. "It's kind of like icing on the cake that we are seeing these other results," said Dr. Vivian Gore Allen, a professor in the university's Plant and Soil Sciences Department who headed up the research. Allen said the mechanism that makes the seaweed effective isn't understood but research is ongoing and the resulting understanding could be applied to other pathogens that infect animals. It is suspected that the seaweed's antioxidant characteristics contribute to the destruction of the E. coli. Jay Johnson, who owns a cattle feed yard near Happy, said meat recalls and instances of tainted beef hurt the industry's image. "Anything we can do to enhance our image, it just helps," he said. "It's very remarkable." The study was a collaboration of researchers and regional industry leaders and included Excel Corp., the San Antonio Live Stock Exosition and the National Cattlemen's Beef Association. The results mark the second time in three months that Tech researchers have found an agent effective in controlling E. coli in live cattle. In April, Tech researchers announced that a bacteria, called a probiotic, similar to the type commonly added to yogurt, cheese and fermented meats, reduced by up to 60 percent the E. coli found in cattle.

ForFull Information, click on
http://www.FoodHACCP.com/indexcopynews.html

07/03. Workshops on Food Security and Recalls
07/03. A RAPID AND IMPROVED METHOD FOR THE DETECTION OF VIBRIO PARA
07/03. EFFECTS OF WEARING KNITTED OR RUBBER GLOVES ON THE TRANSFER
07/03. ACQUISITION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PLASMIDS BY ENTEROHEMOR
07/03. SURVEY OF HYDROGEN SULPHIDE PRODUCTION BY WINE YEASTS
07/03. INFLUENCE OF CHILLING METHODS ON THE QUALITY OF SARDINES (SA
07/03. MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF NINE COMMERCIAL FLATFISH SPECIES
07/03. VACCINATION DELAYS ONSET OF PRION BRAIN DISEASE IN MICE
07/03. BSE: SCIENTISTS PUBLISH GEOGRAPHICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS (GBR)
07/03. JAPANESE MEAT FIRM COLLAPSES AFTER MAD COW SCARE, LABELLING
07/03. MANITOBA INTRODUCES LEGISLATION TO IMPROVE SAFETY OF DRINKIN
07/03. PERSPECTIVE BY EDITOR CHRIS HARRIS
07/03. INDUSTRY, USDA MEET TO DISCUSS DRAFT NOTICE ON SALMONELLA
07/03. US TO FUND E.COLI RESEARCH
07/03. GASTROENTERITIS, FOODBORNE - BAHRAIN
07/03. OFFICIALS DEEM KINGSVILLE PRODUCE SAFE FOR EATING
07/03. HUMECTANT PERMEABILITY INFLUENCES GROWTH AND COMPATIBLE
07/03. SEROTYPING AND RIBOTYPING OF SALMONELLA USING RESTRICTION EN
07/03. CONCENTRATION AND DETECTION OF CALICIVIRUSES FROM FOOD CONTA
07/03. ENUMERATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF YEASTS ASSOCIATED WITH COM
07/03. PRODUCTION OF CYCLOPIAZONIC ACID BY PENICILLIUM COMMUNE ISOL
07/03. COMBINED EFFECT OF GAMMA IRRADIATION, ASCORBIC ACID, AND EDI
07/03. MEAT RECALL IN GREELEY, COLO., PROMPTS DRIVE FOR CARCASS TES
07/03. IRRADIATED BEEF OFFERS HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE FOR CONSUMERS
07/03. GASTROENTERITIS, SCHOOL - PHILIPPINES (MANILA)
07/03. Meat Packer Nippon Shokuhin Files For Court Protection After
07/03. USDA Urged to Test More Beef For E. Coli 0157:H7
07/03. RESISTANCE OF COLD- AND STARVATION-STRESSED VIBRIO VULNIFICU
07/03. GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS IN POSTHARVES
07/03. POSTPACKAGE PASTEURIZATION OF READY-TO-EAT DELI MEATS BY SUB
07/03. DIVERSITY OF CAMPYLOBACTER ISOLATES FROM RETAIL POULTRY CARC
07/03. MICROBIAL PROFILE AND ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CAMPYLOBA
07/03. TESTING FOR SALMONELLA IN RAW MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS COLL
07/03. POTENTIAL FOR THE SPREAD OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157, SALMONELL
07/03. BEHAVIOR OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES INOCULATED ON CANTALOUPE
07/03. DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, AND ANALYSIS OF AN ON-FARM FOOD
07/03. SURVEY INDICATES CONSUMERS FIND FOOD ALLERGEN LABELING INCON
07/03. PEANUTS EXPELLED FROM PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM
07/03. USDA URGED TO TEST MORE BEEF FOR DEADLY BACTERIA
07/03. Progress toward 'mad cow' vaccine
07/03. Officals blame raw milk for Sawyer County illness
07/03. Chronic wasting disease found in New Mexico; Texas acts fast
07/03. German researcher claims smoked sausage linked to multiple s
07/03. DNR will test deer statewide
07/03. Igen sells more toxin tests to the Army
07/03. Texas Tech researchers find marine plant reduces E. coli in
07/03. 07/03. E. coli fear prompts ground beef recall
07/03. Plant aids quest for safer beef
07/03. No recalled meat in G.I. stores
07/03. Price Chopper recalls ground beef
07/03. Buehler Foods voluntarily recalling potentially tainted grou
07/03. Consumers' Association slams food safety board selection
07/03. Meat scares continue in Japan
07/03. Is Thailand ready for GM labelling?
07/03. Nicotine water sales stalled
07/03. 'TRITIUM IS A RISK TO HUMAN HEALTH' CLAIM
07/03. ALLERGY ALERT -Undeclared sulphites in QALALA brand preserved apricot
07/03. New York Firm Recalls Chicken Ravioli For Undeclared Allergens And Incorrect Labeling
07/02. U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated July 1, 2002
07/02. Positive E. coli Test Results: Updated June 28, 2002
07/02. FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated July 1, 2002
07/02. DRAFT FSIS Inspection-Related Issuances for Review
07/02. Panel Approves Funds to Fight Chronic Wasting Disease
07/02. Better E. Coli Technology Planned
07/02. USDA Will Test Meat for Spinal, Brain Tissue
07/02. Industry, USDA Meet to Discuss Draft Notice on Salmonella
07/02. DEGRADATION OF NATURAL PHOSPHORYLATED COMPOUNDS AND
07/02. AMINO ACID DECARBOXYLASE ACTIVITY AND OTHER CHEMICAL
07/02. REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION DETECTION OF BOVINE DNA
07/02. ALLERGENICITY OF HEN'S EGG OVOMUCOID GAMMA IRRADIATED AND HE
07/02. EFFECTS OF UV IRRADIATION ON SELECTED PATHOGENS IN PEPTONE W
07/02. CHANGES IN THE ANTIGENIC AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN E-BINDING PROPER
07/02. BSE
07/02. SCIENTIFIC STEERING COMMITTEE
07/02. AEROBIC AND PSYCHROTROPHIC PLATE COUNT PROCEDURES FOR FRESH
07/02. IMMOBILIZED BACTERIAL SPORES FOR USE AS BIOINDICATORS IN THE
07/02. FACTORS AFFECTING LEAD LEACHING FROM MICROWAVABLE PLASTIC WA
07/02. RELATIONSHIP OF CELL SURFACE CHARGE AND HYDROPHOBICITY TO ST
07/02. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF SODIUM ACETATE AND LACTOBACILLUS RHAM
07/02. TRANSFER OF PERSISTENT LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES CONTAMINATION
07/02. DEVELOPMENT OF A TECHNIQUE TO QUANTIFY THE EFFECTIVENESS OF
07/02. NORWALK-LIKE VIRUS INFECTION: BRITISH COLUMBIA AND ALASKA
07/02. PREVENT FOODBORNE ILLNESS THIS FOURTH OF JULY BY FOLLOWING K
07/02. EU Parliament May Expand Biotech Food-Labeling Rules
07/02. EU to Curb Dioxins Levels in Food/Feed From Today
07/02. BIOASSAY TO DETECT STAPHYLOCOCCAL ENTEROTOXIN
07/02. SURVIVAL OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI IN BIOFILMS ISOLATED FROM C
07/02. EFFECTIVENESS OF CHEMICAL SANITIZERS AGAINST CAMPYLOBACTER J
07/02. INACTIVATION OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM IN ORANGE JUICE CONTA
07/02. TRISODIUM PHOSPHATE INACTIVATION OF ATTACHED SALMONELLA
07/02. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SALMONELLA SPP. ISOLATED FROM
07/02. INHIBITION OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM AND LISTERIA MONOCYTOGE
07/02. METHOD TO DETECT SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROTYPE ENTERITIDIS ST
07/02. PULSED-FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS CHARACTERIZATION OF SHIGA T
07/02. FATE OF FIELD-ISOLATED ESCHERICHIA COLI O157 IN GROUND BEEF
07/02. SURVIVAL DIFFERENCES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 STRAINS IN
07/02. HEINZ SLEUTHS CAN'T DETERMINE HOW BEANS BECAME MOULDY
07/02. CONSUMERS FIND FOOD ALLERGEN LABELING CONFUSING, INCONSISTEN
07/02. MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT TO TEST SHRIMP FOR TOXIC
07/02. TOO LATE FOR E. COLI TESTS, N.B. MINISTER SAYS
07/02. E. COLI O157, GROUND BEEF - USA (MULTISTATE): RECALL
07/02. HAND-HELD SENSOR MAY DETECT E. COLI IN MINUTES
07/02. NEARLY 350 FILIPINO STUDENTS SUFFER FOOD POISONING
07/02. TRANSITIONAL ARRANGMENTS FOR THE JOINT FOOD STANDARDS CODE A
07/02. FOOD SAFETY A PRIORITY FROM PADDOCK TO PLATE
07/02. Calls Increasing for Clarity on Food Labels
07/02. Food allergen labelling - the debate deepens
07/02. Family fears deer caused dad's illness
07/02. Freezing meat increases bacteria risk
07/02. Nature's Way Products, Inc. Recalls Nettle Because of Possible Health Risk
07/02. Nature's Way Has Recalled Nettle July 2
07/02. Colorado Firm Has Recalled Ground Beef Products July 1
07/01. LIMITS ON PRESENCE OF DIOXIN IN FOOD AND FEED ENTER INTO FOR
07/01. NIPPON SHOKUHIN MISLABELED BEEF, ABUSED GOV'T SCHEME
07/01. SPEECH BY DAVID BYRNE
07/01. TRACE TOXINS FOUND
07/01. ECOLAB OFFERS FOOD SAFETY INFORMATION
07/01. HYGIENE RULES: BYRNE WELCOMES COUNCIL AGREEMENT
07/01. TAINTED CAKES MAKE 1,200 SICK IN SPAIN; 68 STILL IN HOSPITAL
07/01. Nature's Way has to recall capsules
07/01. 48 dead in cholera outbreak in Mozambique
07/01. Panel seeks federal rules on date labeling of foods
07/01. Company Recalls Cheese Due To Listeria Contamination
07/01. Statement by deputy commissioner Dr. Lester M. Crawford on acrylamides in food
07/01. Colorado Firm Recalls Ground Beef Products For Possible E. coli O157:H7
06/30 Pastry sickens hundreds at Spanish festival
06/30 FESTIVAL CAKE POISONS 1200 Jun 29 2002
06/30 Some facts on E. coli 0157:H7, a deadly bacterial strain
06/29. Deadly O-157 bacteria runs rampant at nursery school
06/29. Health officials break ring selling illegal disease-ridden m
06/29. Lawyer adds salmonella clients
06/29. Better E. Coli Technology Planned
06/29. Bad Milk Blamed for Wis. Outbreak
06/28. OPPDE What's New Page: Updated June 28, 2002
06/28. Notice of Request for New Information Collection Regarding Industry Practices
06/28. Consumer Practices, Concerns, and Awareness Specific to Meat, Poultry, and Egg
06/28. Was it the stew? 20 sick at juvenile center
06/28. PERILOUS PLASTIC?
06/28. HOUSE AGRICULTURE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEE FUNDS
06/28. FARMS, EATERIES FINED FOR IMPROPER FOOD HANDLING
06/28. SAUSAGES MAY INCREASE MS RISK
06/28. FERRY WATER SUPPLY FEARED CONTAMINATED
06/28. Bad Milk Blamed for Wis. Outbreak
06/28. FRANCE AGAIN DELAYS SHEEP LAW BY 6 MONTHS
06/28. NFPA CALLS WHO©öS POSITION ON DIET AND ACRYLAMIDE : ©øSENSIBLE
06/28. GMA SUPPORTS WHO STATEMENTS ON ACRYLAMIDE
06/28. OUTBREAK OF MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT SALMONELLA NEWPORT
06/28. OUTBREAK OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI INFECTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH
06/28. Hundreds receive shots following hepatitis A report
06/28. Two recalls target sausage with listeria and E. coli O157:H7
06/28. Probiotic bacteria at weaning may help alleviate allergy in
06/28. Change In One Base Pair Can Create A Typhoid Mary
06/28. France Faces Beef Ban Deadline
06/28. U.S. unveils 5-point CWD program
06/28. Sausage products recalled
06/28. Pastry sickens hundreds at Spanish festival
06/28. Angola [Indiana] water OK after positive bacteria test
06/28. Acrylamide in foods - calls for more research
06/28. Chemical in Starchy Foods Baffles Health Groups
06/28. Chronic Wasting Disease and Wisconsin Deer
06/28. Federal government has plan to battle chronic wasting diseas
06/28. Chemical in Food Deemed 'Serious Problem'
06/28. Imported FARMER brand Shandong peanuts may contain dangerous bacteria
06/28. Consumer Alert: Undeclared Sulfites in Pickled Sour Bamboo Shoot Slices
06/28. FreshPoint of Denver Recalls Processed Fruits and Vegetables
06/28. FreshPoint Has Recalled Processed Fruits and Vegetables June 27

USDA/FDA NEWS
For full information, click on
http://www.FoodHACCP.com/regulation.html
Workshops on Food Security and Recalls
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated July 1, 2002
Positive E. coli Test Results: Updated June 28, 2002
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated July 1, 2002
DRAFT FSIS Inspection-Related Issuances for Review
Statement by deputy commissioner Dr. Lester M. Crawford on acrylamides in food
OPPDE What's New Page: Updated June 28, 2002
Notice of Request for New Information Collection Regarding Industry Practices
Consumer Practices, Concerns, and Awareness Specific to Meat, Poultry, and Egg Products
OPPDE What's New Page: Updated June 27, 2002
Cyanotech Corp., Withdrawal of Food Additive Petition
Biosecurity and Recall Workshops
Detection and Quantitation of Acrylamide in Foods
Dow Chemical Co.; Withdrawal of Food Additive Petition
Secondary Direct Food Additives for Human Consumption
FDA Increases Sampling of Imported Shrimp and Crayfish (Crawfish)
WAFDO/FDA Biosecurity and Recall Workshops
Program Priorities in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition
USDA Offers Picnicking Tips for Summertime Food Safety
Food Advisory Committee Meeting; Cancellation
Labeling Requirements for Color Additives
Salmonella Discovery System Pilot Study
Positive E. coli Test Results: Updated June 30, 2002

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