Food Safety NewsLetter - FoodHACCP.com
12/09/2002
Issue 31

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USDA BOOSTS INSPECTION RULES
source from: Meatnews.com Vol 4 Issue 49
APHIS proposes rule to grant agency authority to collect blood and tissue samples in slaughter plants. The USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) last week published a proposed rule that would enhance the agency's authorities to collect blood and tissue samples in slaughter plants as part of its animal health surveillance and monitoring system. The rule will grant APHIS the authority to require slaughterhouses to provide access to all blood and tissue samples APHIS needs for optimal disease surveillance.
Slaughterhouses will also be compelled to provide the space and equipment within their plants needed to collect the samples.
APHIS' proposed rule will establish requirements at slaughter facilities for the collection of blood and tissue (including brains) samples from livestock (horses, cattle, bison, captive cervids, sheep and goats, swine and other farm animals) and poultry moved interstate.
APHIS is also proposing that any person, who moves livestock or poultry interstate for slaughter may move the animals only to a slaughterhouse approved by the APHIS administrator. Approved establishments will provide the type of space and facilities specified by the regulations to safely collect blood and tissue samples for disease testing. The APHIS administrator can also grant certain slaughter establishments exceptions to this provision if no sample collection is needed from that establishment. Ultimately, the rule will allow APHIS to collect blood and tissue samples for any disease APHIS deems necessary. It will have a significant impact in broadening APHIS' responsibility for identifying and addressing emerging diseases. Under the proposed rule, USDA employees or USDA-employed
contractors would collect samples at the slaughter plant.


Humor from Benoit Leblanc

Food Safety General News
12/06. EUROPE©öS MOST MODERN MEAT PROCESSING PLANT TO SWEDEN
12/06. TRACE BACK IDENTIFED AS KEY TO CONSUMER CONFIDENCE
12/06. VIRUS RATTLES CRUISE INDUSTRY AND HEALTH OFFICIALS
12/06. CONSUMERS SHOULD FOCUS ON A BALANCED DIET,
12/06. NO CREDIBLE EVIDENCE THAT ACRYLAMIDE IN FOODS POSES
12/06. FSIS NOTICE INDICATES CHANGE IN PROCEDURE FOR
12/06. MEAT HORMONE WORKING GROUP SET UP
12/06. N.B. FALLS UNDER FIRE FOR SLOPPY E. COLI RESPONSE
12/06. BSE UPDATE
12/06. USDA BOOSTS INSPECTION RULES
12/06. NO-LIABILITY RULING OVER INFECTED OYSTERS
12/06. EU: Food safety chief to start work in February
12/06. Reasoned response fries activist's arguments against irradia
12/06. APHIS asking for authority to increase tissue sampling in pa
12/06. New Rules on Testing Meat Products
12/06. Most victims of Walkerton water disaster fully recovered, st
12/06. Meat processor relates efforts to spur safety -
12/06. Food safety: measuring exposure
12/06. Food inspection program beefed up
12/05. Keep Children Safe From Foodborne Illness During The Holidays
12/05. NORWAY: Industry meeting after Norwegian meat scandals
12/05. USA: FDA tests show acrylamide levels vary widely
12/05. GMO science network launched in EU
12/05. Permit extended for speedy CWD test
12/05. Sixth Cow In Japan May Have Mad Cow Disease
12/05. Listeria Roulette
12/05. FOOD IRRADIATION UPDATE
12/05. Restaurant Complaints More Than Double
12/05. Irradiated Meat Threatens Consumer Health, Warns M.D.
12/04. Plastics and the Microwave
12/04. Exploratory Data on Acrylamide in Foods
12/04. RESULTS FROM FDA RESEARCH ON ACRYLAMIDE ©øNOT A FINDING 12/04. IS AMERICAN VENISON SAFE?
12/04. FORT WALTON BEACH, FLA., EATERIES EMPHASIZE SAFE FOOD
12/04. TAINTED CHEESE-SUIT
12/04. SUPERMARKETS, RESTAURANTS JUMP ON THE IRRADIATED BURGER BAND
12/04. FOOD IRRADIATION KILLS DISEASE-CAUSING BACTERIA --
12/04. U.S. agency finds highly variable levels of worrisome chemic
12/04. Gingerbread Found to Contain Cancer-Linked Chemical
12/04. Cracking A Peanut's Deadly Secrets
12/04. Pitt, Carnegie Mellon give away bioterrorism-detection softw
12/04. State Ag. Dept. Stops Sale of Food At Decatur Store Due to R
12/04. Think food safety when making edible gifts
12/04. Health rules keep local restaurants safe, clean
12/03. USDA NATIONAL NEEDS FELLOWSHIPS FOR GRADUATE TRAINING
12/03. France criticised over proposed meat safety law
12/03. Food safety tops Spanish consumer concerns
12/03. U.S. Meat Inspector Draws Fire For Hard Line on Food Safety
12/03. EVERYONE MUST BE CJD TESTED
12/03. Piggly Wiggly and Dick's Supermarkets to Sell SureBeam(R) Pr
12/03. Defects in food


Food safety: measuring exposure http://www.nutraingredients.com/news/news.asp?id=6022
05/12/02 - A European funded project currently underway will seek to facilitate the assessment of exposure to a range of food chemicals ?to include food additives, pesticides and nutrients, in a bid to meet the growing need for food safety guarantees. The new technology is intended for use by regulatory authorities, industries, nutritionists and researchers.
Led by Prof. Dr Michael Gibney at the Institute of European Food Studies in Dublin, Ireland, the principal remit of the project is to provide insights into all aspects related to the safety of the food supply; including exposure to, for example, pesticide residues, micronutrients and mycotoxins.
The project, called ‘MonteCarlo? will use powerful mathematical modelling techniques to analyse and assess exposure so that risk (or potential benefit in the case of assessing nutrient intakes) to health may be evaluated more accurately.
At a basic level, the procedure for estimating exposure to a food chemical (for example, an additive) is to multiply food intake by the concentration of the chemical in food. If foods containing the chemical of interest are under-reported, then the exposure of the chemical from those foods, and therefore the risk, may be underestimated.
The first objective for the project is to conduct a multi-centre study, using existing national data, to explore the influence of input distributions on model output for the key components of a stochastic model of food chemical intake. These components are food intake, chemical occurrence, chemical concentration, market share, brand loyalty, and correlated foods.
The second objective is to generate databases of true intakes of: food additives, based on brand-level food consumption and ingredient composition, pesticide residues, based on duplicate diets, and nutrients, based on biomarker studies.The final objective is to use the true?databases to validate the probabilistic models and the associated computer code.Further information about the other objectives and expected outcomes of project QLK1-1999-00155 (MONTECARLO) can be obtained on the website.

DNA TRACEABILITY
December 5, 2002
from Meatnews.com Vol 4 Issue 49
New DNA testing kit helps traceability of meat cuts.
A new DNA Storage Kit, which can be used to collect, store and analyse DNA samples from animals, has been launched to help ease tracking meat supplies. The manufacturers, DNA Point, say it can aid keeping a record of meat going through processing plants.
The Animal DNA Storage Kits can be used outside of laboratories for sampling without the need for any of the special equipment normally required for DNA collection and storage. The method simply requires a small fragment of meat to be pressed onto a special paper support or alternatively a blood sample can be used. Identification of samples and recording samples is carried out by bar coding the various components of the kits. . Meat that is further 'down' the supply chain that is suspected to be (or has been found to be) out of specification can be sampled in a similar way. For identification purposes a genetic profile unique to each individual animal can be determined and compared to the portion of meat that was questioned. The profile would be done at an independent contract-testing laboratory.

 

OUTBREAK NEWS
12/06. AMMONIA CHICKEN BLAMED FOR MAKING ILLINOIS STUDENTS ILL
12/05. FIFTH FAMILY MEMBER IS HIT BY E.COLI
12/05. Gut feeling: Tough virus is making the rounds
12/04. Virus outbreak hits another cruise ship
12/04. Mystery over source of deadly outbreak
12/03. Sailing the sickening seas
12/03. Three young sisters in E-coli bug scare
12/03. Cause of Outbreak Still a Mystery
12/03. Tummy Trouble On High Seas
12/03. Twelve Die in India Village After Eating Bad Meat

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Recall News
12/06. State Agriculture Commissioner Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Peanuts
12/06. Stop & Shop recalls ground beef -
12/06. Undeclared nuts and sulfites in THE MARKETPLACE brand cookies
12/06. Undeclared sulphites in S.R. PACKAGING CHRISTMAS PUDDING
12/06. Kellogg USA Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Egg in Kellogg's¢ç Pop-Tarts¢ç
12/06. America's Catch, Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Egg White in Breaded Catfish
12/06. Consumer Alert: Undeclared Sulfites in Winter Melon Candy
12/06. Recall extension: Swiss-American, Inc. Also Recalls Imported Danish Havarti
12/06. Swiss-American Has Recalled Prima Della Imported Danish Havarti Dec 6
12/06. Sunny Lake Trading Has Recalled "Winter Melon Candy" Dec 6
12/06. America's Catch Has Recalled Breaded Catfish Nuggets Dec 6
12/05. Florida Firm Recalls Pork Sausage Products For Possible Listeria Contamination
12/04. December 3 - Advisory - Lollipop Investigation Reveals No Foreign Contamination
12/04. Mississippi Firm Recalls Souse Products For Possible Listeria Contamination
12/03. Undeclared milk protein and undeclared wheat in ASIA BAKERY cakes
12/03. Choking hazard posed by CITYFOOD FRUITS KONNYAK JELLY

USDA/FDA News
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated December 6, 2002
OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated December 4, 2002
Keep Children Safe From Foodborne Illness During The Holidays
FDA's Food Advisory Committee Discusses Acrylamide in Food
Exploratory Data on Acrylamide in Foods
Plastics and the Microwave
Compliance Policy Guide: Filth from Insects, Rodents, and Other Pests in Food
OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated November 29, 2002
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated November 29, 2002
FSIS To Hold Public Meeting To Discuss The Recall Process

NEW METHODS
Faster E. coli test in works
High-tech system would give instant results for drinking water. Tests now take 24 hours
from www.detnews.com
By Gene Schabath / The Detroit News
HARRISON TOWNSHIP -- Researchers are within a year of developing a rapid-fire monitoring system, about the size of two packs of cigarettes, that would give instant readings of E. coli bacteria contamination in lakes and rivers and immediately detect deadly chemicals in drinking water, scientists say. The real-time system would protect Metro Detroit's drinking water system from terrorist attacks and readily determine whether Lake St. Clair and other waterways are safe for swimming, said Carl Freeman, a Wayne State University professor.
Freeman belongs to a consortium of professors creating the new system.
"This will be 21st-century technology," said Doug Martz, chairman of the Macomb Water Quality Board. "We now have World War II technology. We're still using petri dishes. I've been waiting five years for this."
Besides its water capabilities, the system will monitor smallpox and anthrax in the air, officials said. Test results on E. coli in water now take 24 hours to obtain. That means swimmers in Lake St. Clair and elsewhere could be bathing in water contaminated with E. coli bacteria before the analysis is able to warn anybody, Freeman said.
Martz praised the plans for the new monitoring system. He said it will be a pollution buster because it will identify its sources.
Wayne State scientists have already developed a real-time monitoring system, called an air and water pathogen bio-sensor, under a $2.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.
"It's in the prototype stage right now, but we can start ... with some preliminary testing," said Greg Auner, a Wayne State professor who heads the team creating the system.
Auner's work will dovetail with research that will soon start under a $3.5 million grant awarded last week to the U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) in Warren under Congress defense spending bill. Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, will meet with reporters today at Metropolitan Beach in Harrison Township to discuss the grant. The grant will be used in Warren "to develop water monitoring for detection of chemical and biological warfare agents," said Jay Dusenbury, a science and technology team leader at TACOM.
The primary focus of the new grant is to protect the drinking water of American troops, said Jeremy Walker, an environmental engineer at TACOM. But the same technology could be used to protect drinking water at more than a dozen municipal water intakes in Metro Detroit.

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