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1/16, 2003
ISSUE: 42
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Old clothes filter out cholera
Using old saris to filter drinking water collected from rivers and ponds has halved the number of cholera cases in remote Bangladeshi villages.

Clothes clean drinking water
Filtering drinking water from rivers and ponds through a folded piece of cotton cloth could cut disease by half in cholera-plagued countries, a new field study suggests.

Mionix Safe(2)O(TM)brand RTE Meat Solution Kills Listeria and Prevents Regrowth According to Texas A&M University Study

Sponsors Section
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IGEN
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Carcinogens Occur Naturally in Food Supplies
Daily Policy Digest
Regulatory Issues / Food, Drug and Tobacco Regulation
Tuesday, January 14, 2003 http://www.ncpa.org/iss/reg/2003/pd011403g.html
All the "carcinogens" found in the foods comprising a traditional holiday dinner occur naturally in foods and pose no hazard to human life, say researchers from the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH).
None of these chemicals are made by man or added to the foods, yet in large enough doses, they do cause cancer in laboratory animals.
Consumers choosing to worry about eating these chemicals should understand the human diet is full of naturally occurring rodent carcinogens.
Residues of synthetic rodent carcinogens in our diet are unlikely to pose a risk of cancer in the quantities we consume on a daily, monthly or yearly basis.
The data is inadequate to evaluate human risk at low doses, and the uncertainties are enormous.
Many of these naturally occurring rodent carcinogens are natural pesticides -- chemicals that plants produce to repel or kill predators.
Of the approximately 10,000 such natural pesticides occurring in the diet, only about 60 have been tested in rodent experiments.
These chemicals are found in a wide variety of food plants: Brussels sprouts, cantaloupe, cauliflower, cherries, chili peppers, cocoa, garlic, grapes, kale, lentils, lettuce and radishes.
The primary risk factor in holiday meals -- other than the risk of food poisoning from the improper handling or preparation of food -- is getting too much of a good thing. A hungry holiday eater can easily consume 2,000-plus calories at one sitting. A consistent intake of excessive calories contributes to obesity, with its attendant higher risk of heart disease.
Source: Editorial, "Health Panel Finds All-Natural Carcinogens Galore in Holiday Foods," American Council on Science and Health, October 2002.
For text
http://www.acsh.org/publications/booklets/menu02.html
For more on Food, Drug and Tobacco Regulation
http://www.ncpa.org/iss/reg/

GUIDELINES FOR USE OF MICROBIOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS IN STANDARD SETTINGS
January 14, 2003
World Health Organization Food Safety Department No 4
http://www.who.int/fsf/Documents/Report_Kiel.pdf
The report of the joint FAO/WHO Consultation, held in Kiel on 18 ?22 March
2002, on "Principles and Guidelines for incorporating microbiological risk
assessment (MRA) in the development of food safety standards, guidelines and
related texts? is now available. Due to the limited experience in this area
it has been decided to retain the guidelines in draft format for the moment
to provide further opportunity for their review in the coming year and if
possible better address some of the more difficult issues. Electronic
copies are now available on the Food Safety website:
http://www.who.int/fsf/Documents/Report_Kiel.pdf

Oregon's largest E. coli outbreak headed for the courtroom
http://www.katu.com/news/story.asp?ID=53810
EUGENE - The largest E. coli outbreak in state history appears ready to enter its next phase: the legal system.
Fifteen families took that first step Monday, informing officials they plan to sue over the outbreak at last summer's Lane County Fair.
Nine other families may also take legal action, their lawyer said. In all, 82 fairgoers were infected with E. coli, the biggest such outbreak in state history. Nearly two-thirds of those were children under age 6. Twelve children were sent to Portland hospitals for treatment of hemolytic uremic syndrome, a potentially fatal complication of E. coli infection that causes kidney failure.
Seattle lawyer Bill Marler notified county and fair board officials that he would file outbreak-related claims on behalf of the families. Such notice is required under state law. Once claims are filed, likely within 30 days, county attorneys will review them and decide whether to pay the families. If the county rejects the claims, the families can file suit.
"The fact the outbreak happened is evidence the fair did not do enough to protect kids from becoming ill," Marler said. The 15 families represent 14 children and four adults. Among those filing were Bill and Shelly Walter, whose 2-year-old daughter, Carson, spent 31 days at Doernbecher Children's Hospital in Portland, including two stints in the pediatric intensive care unit. She underwent 17 rounds of dialysis that filtered toxins from her blood.
Bill Walter said he hopes a lawsuit will force the fair to reduce the E. coli risk for people attending future fairs and he hopes a jury award or settlement will ensure his daughter gets the future medical care she'll likely need.
Oregon's "tort caps" law limits the liability of government agencies. Under the law, the most any single family could recover from the fair board is $200,000.
E. coli is most commonly spread through contaminated ground beef and water. But public health investigators traced the fair outbreak to the sheep and goat exposition hall on the south side of the fairgrounds.
At next summer's fair, officials said they plan to increase the number of hand-washing stations, educate the public about how to behave around animals, use greater vigilance to keep animal areas clean and install hygienic mats for wiping shoes outside animals barns.
Warren Wong, managing director of the fair, said he doesn't think the fair board will be held responsible for the outbreak.
"Our insurance adjusters and attorneys have opined that the fair did not do anything that was negligent, so we don't believe that we are liable," he said.

E. COLI O157:H7
January 13, 2003
Lean Trimmings
Edited by Kiran Kernellu
The National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA) hosted a Beef Industry
Summit meeting last Tuesday/Wednesday in San Antonio, TX. Over 200 leaders from all segments of the industry attended for the purpose of developing an
aggressive battle plan for the industry in its fight against E. coli O157:H7. The group held breakout sessions to formulate plans that outline good manufacturing practices and interventions that are ready for implementation to reduce the incidence of E. coli O157:H7 and enhance the
safety of U.S. beef products. The meeting was by invitation only to assure open and forthright discussion among the parties. This ensured that all ideas, good and bad, were welcome for thoughtful discussion. Key industry leaders for each industry segment:
Producer; Slaughter/Fabrication; Processing; Distribution; Foodservice; and Retail set the stage upfront, met for extended time in breakout, and came together again in final presentations. Dr. James Reagan, NCBA's Vice
President for Food Safety was the Moderator and Terry Stokes, NCBA's CEO provided the end summary.
NMA's Executive Director Rosemary Mucklow attended, and participated in the Slaughter/Fabrication breakout group. NMA's Director, Tim Biela of Texas American Foodservice, also attended and was the designated leader for the Processing segment. Dave Theno of NMA- member Foodmaker was the designated co-leader of the Foodservice segment. The most significant outcome was the strong support by the industry across all segments to collaborate in efforts to work forcefully together to reduce
and even remove E. coli O157:H7 from the beef supply. Some media suggest that this is not a newsworthy outcome. We respectfully disagree! There is no
"silver bullet" such as processing pasteurization that solved the problem of this pathogen in commercial juices! Irradiation is a major step, but neither acceptable nor desirable for all systems. The only real "fix" is cooking to
an internal temperature of 160?F. However, as it became clear as each final presentation was made, there are many additional possibilities for reduction in pre-harvest - in a new segment defined for us by Dr. Gary Smith as an
interface between pre-harvest and harvest, in slaughter and fabrication, improved handling at foodservice, quick service restaurants, and retail. There are even some possibilities for the processing segment, one of the
most difficu lt in which to apply interventions.
What's next? The leaders in each group will be taking the message back home to their organizations and working on continued improvements. For the slaughter group, the NMA/SMA draft best practices were discussed and edited, and will hopefully be supported by other industry organizations representing slaughterers. NMA is also appreciative of an interest to update the Guidelines that we sponsored for ground beef production several years ago, and that is now underway. We cannot conclude our report on this very important Summit without
acknowledging first the leadership of Terry Stokes, NCBA CEO, the input of distinguished scientists from USDA's Agricultural Research Service, from the International HACCP Alliance, and from academia. In our estimation, there is a will to solve this problem. The way will be found, and the seeds were laid in the ground at this excellent Summit in San Antonio last week.

Current Outbreaks
01/15. Gastro outbreak cases climb to 67
01/15. One man dead as food poisoning scare grips city
01/14. E. COLI O157:H7 INCIDENT IN BAY AREA
01/13. HEPATITIS A VIRUS, TAP WATER - ALBANIA
01/13. CRUISE VIRUS ATTACKS NEW YORKERS ON SHORE
01/12. Customer support buoys cheese maker

01/11. E. coli victim at home
01/10. GIRL INFECTED AFTER EATING TAINTED CHEESE RECOVERING IN
01/10. E. coli At SF Day Care Center Sickens Eight Kids
01/10. Poisoning Hits Six Kuala Belait Children
01/08. Eighth person contracts E.coli

Current Food Recall
01/15. Bear Creek Stores, Inc. Dba, Harry and David Issues Allergy Alert
01/14. Amendt Corporation Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Non Fat Dry Milk and Egg
01/13. Listeria in fish leads to recall in France
01/10. EnfaCare¢ē LIPIL¢ē Infant Formula Powder Recall
01/10. Mead Johnson Nutritionals Has Recalled EnfaCare¢ē LIPIL¢ē Infant Formula
01/10. ALLERGY ALERT - Presence of undeclared egg in NINTENDO JELLY POP

Current USDA/FDA News
Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002
Library of Export Requirements: Updated January 14, 2003
OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated January 14, 2003
35th Session of the Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated January 10, 2003
OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated January 10, 2003

Current Food Safety News
01/15. Carcinogens Occur Naturally in Food Supplies
01/15. GUIDELINES FOR USE OF MICROBIOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENTS IN ST -
01/15. RISK ASSESSMENTS OF SALMONELLA IN EGGS AND BROILER CHICKENS
01/15. COLORADO MEATPACKER POINTS TO FOOD-SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS
01/15. FDA changes in feed restriction won't reduce BSE risk, indus
01/15. EuropaBio meets with Commissioners to discuss GM defacto mor
01/15. Quebec Liberal Party Priorities for Action : Healthy Food -
01/15. Old clothes filter out cholera -
01/15. Perspective by Meat Processing North American Edition
01/15. Oregon's largest E. coli outbreak headed for the courtroom
01/15. Irradiated beef hits Cape grocery store
01/15. Meat plant bolstering food safety
01/15. Families begin process of filing E. coli lawsuits
01/15. Strengthening food safety at festival
01/15. Concern over BSE and Cattle Tongues
01/15. Confusion over the term 'flu' annoys some experts, worries o

01/14. BSE: MONTHLY REPORTS OF MEMBER STATES ON BSE AND SCRAPIE UPD
01/14. BSE: OPINIONS OF SSC RELATED TO GEOGRAPHICAL BSE RISK ASSESS
01/14. BSE: BSE DIAGNOSTICS UPDATED
01/14. BSE: SSC OPINIONS ON ANIMAL BY-PRODUCTS AND THE SAFETY OF CE
01/14. BSE: KEY SSC OPINIONS ON THE TRANSMISSION AND RISK OF BSE TO
01/14. BLOOD AND TISSUE COLLECTION AT SLAUGHTERING ESTABLISHMENTS
01/14. BSE ROUNDTABLE COALITION
01/14. CANADA: A WORLD LEADER IN ON-FARM FOOD SAFETY
01/14. SALMONELLA REPORT
01/14. E. COLI O157:H7
01/14. PRODUCE SAFETY TRAINER HELPS FARMERS IN CAROLINAS WITH
01/14. SHOPPERS CARE MORE FOR VALUE THAN FOOD SAFETY
01/14. USDA AIMS TO BEEF UP SCRUTINY OF MEAT INDUSTRY, PREVENT RECA -
01/14. Specified Risk Material Found In Spanish Beef
01/14. BSE in Spain
01/14. Menace in venison -
01/14. Settlement nears in Crypto lawsuit
01/14. Clothes clean drinking water
01/14. Mad cow not spread by embryos
01/14. Patent gives SureBeam technological edge
01/14. MSG: A Common Flavor Enhancer
01/14. Caterers sent egg safety leaflet

01/13. RAW MEAT GOES TO THE DOGS: INTRODUCING A DINNER FIT FOR A KI
01/13. A NEW DOCUMENTARY CLAIMS OTTAWA DIDN'T RELEASE TEST RESULTS
01/13. CITY OF BUGS
01/13. Merced County Squeezes Illegal Raw Milk Market
01/13. NORTH BATTLEFORD RESIDENTS SEEK $3,000 EACH
01/13. PEANUT BUTTER SANDWICH NOT WORTH DYING FOR
01/13. MYCOTOXINS: RISKS IN PLANT, ANIMAL, AND HUMAN SYSTEMS
01/13. OUR PERSPECTIVE: IRRADIATION GETS BENCHED IN SAN ANTONIO
01/12. New research disputes linkage between meat and cancer
01/12. DEALER SOLD ROTTEN MEAT
01/12. Downward Trend in BSE Incidents
01/11. Giant Eagle First to Sell SureBeam(R) Processed Fresh Ground
01/11. Giant Eagle offers new wave of buying beef -
01/11. New system to track Miyagi oysters

Beating Listeria Regrowth
Researchers in the USA discover new products to help the meat industry fight Listeria.
http://www.meatnews.com/
Researchers at Texas A&M University in the USA have discovered a new organic acid that could be used to help kill Listeria pathogens. The researchers looked into way of preventing the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in refrigerated, ready-to-eat foods such as frankfurters and cold meats, which they said could be a problem.
If these products are cooked well the Listeria is killed, however, there may be a risk of surface contamination at some point between the cooking and packaging stages, the research team said.
Lactic acid and sodium lactate are both known to inhibit organisms such as L. monocytogenes, but are not completely effective against regrowth.
Now the team from Texas A&M University has found promising results from a novel organic-acid, calcium-sulphate combination for surface treatment of ready-to-eat products. The product not only kills the Listeria on the food surface but has a long-lasting residual effect that prevents its regrowth.
According to Professor Jimmy Keeton, the sensory and physical properties of meat products are changed only a little by acidified calcium sulphate.Treated frankfurters had a slightly lower pH and slightly increased calcium content, but tasted the same. The product could be particularly useful as an additional measure in meat-processing factories, where prevention of cross-contamination is a constant concern.A summary of the research has been submitted to the USDA Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) as supporting evidence for use of the material. The USDA is in the process of considering the control of L. monocytogenes in processing plants. A directive issued in November requires meat-processing plants producing high- and medium-risk ready-to-eat products such as hot dogs and deli meats that do not already have a valid testing regime for Listeria to be subject to an intensified testing programme by the USDA FSIS.
Web posted: January 14, 2003
Category: Food Safety,Research
harris@wattpub.demon.co.uk