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12/13
2010
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2011 HACCP (Basic and Advanced)
Class Schedule
Basic HACCP Chicago, IL January 24 and 25, 2011
Basic HACCP
Camden, NJ February 7 and 8, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago February 21 and 22, 2011
Advanced HACCP Chicago February 23 and 24, 2011
Basic HACCP San Francisco February 28 and March 1, 2011
Basic HACCP Houston TX March 7 and 8, 2011
Basic HACCP Yuma AZ March 21 and 22, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL March 28 and 29, 2011
Basic HACCP Los Angeles CA April 4 and 5, 2011
Basic HACCP Ft Lauderdale FL April 11 and 12, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL April 25 and 26, 2011
Advanced HACCP Chicago April 27 and 28, 2011
Basic HACCP Visalia CA May 9 and 10, 2011
Advanced HACCP Visalia CA May 11 and 12, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL May 23 and 24, 2011
Basic HACCP Seattle WA June 6 and 7 2011
Basic HACCP Atlanta GA June, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL June 27 and 28, 2011
Advanced HACCP Chicago IL June 29 and 30, 2011
Basic HACCP Los Angeles July 11 and 12, 2011
Advanced HACCP Los Angeles July 13 and 14, 2011
Basic HACCP Camden NJ July 18 and 19, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL July 26 and 27, 2011
Basic HACCP Visalia CA August 1 and 2, 2011
Basic HACCP Houston TX August 15 and 16, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL August 29 and 30, 2011
Advanced HACCP Chicago IL August 31 and September 1, 2011

Basic HACCP Dallas TX September 12 and 13, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL September 26 and 27, 2011
Basic HACCP Ft Lauderdale FL October 10 and 11, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL October 24 and 25, 2011

Basic HACCP Camden NJ November 7 and 8, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL November 28 and 29, 2011
Basic HACCP Los Angeles CA December 5 and 6, 2011
Basic HACCP Visalia CA December 12 and 13, 2011

HHS Releases New 10-year Food Safety Goals
Source: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2010/12/hhs-releases-new-10-year-food-safety-goals/

by News Desk | Dec 06, 2010
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has set a wide range of public health goals to aim for over the next decade with the release of its Healthy People 2020 report. Among the objectives--which take aim at everything from obesity to oral health--are specific new food safety goals.
The food safety section of the report uses average FoodNet foodborne illness data from 2006 to 2008 to set target percentage reductions for 2020.
Healthy People 2020 sets a number of percentage reduction goals as well as targets per 100,000 people, among them:

-- 33 percent for Campylobacter (from 12.7 cases to 8.5 per 100,000)

-- 50 percent for E.coli O157:H7 (1.2 cases to .6 cases)

-- 25 percent for Listeria monocytogenes (.3 cases to .2 cases)

-- 25 percent for Salmonella (15.2 cases to 11.4 cases)

-- 50 percent for hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in children under five (1.8 to .9)
According to Meatingplace, a meat industry publication, the 2020 report is the first time HHS included health objectives based on commodity-specific foodborne illness outbreaks. The report focuses on reductions in E.coli O157:H7, Campylobacter, Listeria and Salmonella. Meatingplace published two simplified tables not the report here.
Healthy People 2020 sets an across the board reduction goal of 10 percent, for all selected commodity groups, and specifies what that improvement would look like in cases per 100,000 people:

-- beef (from 200 cases to 180)

-- dairy (from 786 to 707)

-- fruits and nuts (from 311 to 380 cases)

-- leafy vegetables (from 205 to 185)

-- poultry (from 258 to 232).
The entire Healthy People 2020 is available at www.healthypeople.gov/2020

House to Consider Food Safety Bill This Week
Source: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2010/12/house-to-take-up-food-safety-bill-this-week/
by Helena Bottemiller | Dec 08, 2010
House Democratic leaders are indicating that beleaguered food safety legislation will likely be considered by the lower chamber this week, as early as Wednesday or Thursday.
The food safety bill hit the rocks last week after the Senate easily passed its version, 73-25. Then it came to light that the bill contained a revenue-raising provision, which is technically unconstitutional--the Constitution stipulates that such measures originate in the House.

With little time left in the 111th Congress, it appears the bill may get a break in the next few days.
Tuesday, Democratic leadership asked lawmakers to respond by the end of the day indicating how they planned to vote, a concrete step toward moving legislation to the floor. A senior Democratic leadership aide told Food Safety News that, depending on support, the bill could be on the floor this week.
It is unclear whether the House will take up a stand-alone bill or attach it to another piece of legislation.
House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) told reporters Tuesday that lawmakers would consider a new version of the food safety bill--even though they passed a stronger version in July 2009 than the Senate did last week--in order to expedite the process and possibly return the bill to the Senate for approval by the weekend.
"We think that's a better bill," Hoyer said, referring to the House food safety bill, which contains new broad authorities for FDA, increased inspection frequencies, and fees to supplement costs, "but we're inclined to take the Senate bill, and the new bill will reflect the Senate bill."
As Mike Lillis of The Hill rightly noted yesterday: "Returning the bill to the Senate complicates the process. Not only have Senate Republicans vowed to oppose anything that hits the floor before tax cuts and government funding matters are finalized, but the second upper chamber vote allows Sen. Tom Coburn [R-OK] another chance to block the bill."
Sen. Coburn has been the measure's most vehement opponent, arguing that it would add to the deficit (although the Congressional Budget Office says it's deficit neutral), increase government bureaucracy, and does not address systemic problems with food safety enforcement. His objection was circumvented by invoking cloture, a maneuver that requires 60 votes.
"Coburn's stalling tactics have left bill supporters wary that there's little room on the Senate calendar to accommodate the food safety vote if he repeats them," said Lillis on The Hill's Healthwatch blog.
There is speculation on Capitol Hill that the House will consider a version very similar--if not identical--to the Senate bill, with changes to address the presumably unconstitutional provision. The Senate could then consider the bill as an attachment to a combination of other measures expected to pass before Congress adjourns.
Whether the final version would contain an amendment by Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT) to exempt small farms and products under certain circumstances, which was included in the Senate bill, is not completely clear. Sustainable agriculture and local food advocates expressed confidence that the House would leave the language intact, but the giants of the produce industry, including the United Fresh Produce Association and the Produce Marketing Association, are working to get the provision dropped.
The leading produce trade groups have long argued that any exemptions should be based on science and risk, not geography and gross income, as the Senate exemptions are.
"It is up to the House to see if they want to fix this," Robert Guenther, United Fresh's vice president for public policy, told Food Safety News. "A lot of people are working on this behind scenes ... we are still hoping the House makes some changes."

Research backs high-power pulsed light technology as food safety tool
Source: http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Quality-Safety/Research-backs-high-power-pulsed-light-technology-as-food-safety-tool
By Rory Harrington, 02-Dec-2010
Related topics: Quality & Safety
A technique using high-power pulsed light is a fast, effective and green solution for combating food pathogens on chicken in a food processing environment, according to a new study.
The research, published in the Journal of Food Safety by a team of Lithuanian scientists, found that use of the non-thermal technology was successful in reducing plate counts of bacteria such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes.
No significant changes in meat lipid peroxidation or sensory characteristics were detected in chicken treated under non-thermal conditions, said the group from the Institute of Applied Research in Vilnius.
The scientists said the bespoke equipment they developed and data obtained could be used for the ¡°advanced development of high-power pulsed light technique which could be used for nonthermal decontamination of different food matrices (fruits, vegetables, eggs shell, fish and meat) and food-related packaging surfaces¡¦processing equipment for the food, medical and pharmaceutical industries.¡±
High-power pulsed light is a technique that intense and short duration pulses of broad spectrum light ranging from 200 nm to 1,000 nm to cleanse surfaces. It was approved for food surface decontamination by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1999.
Method
The experiments employed a spread plate method to evaluate antimicrobial efficiency of high-power pulsed light on the foodborne pathogens in vitro and after inoculation on the surface of skinless chicken breast meat.
The team established that only ultraviolet light was effective in reducing bacteria counts. They exposed the samples to high-power pulsed light treatment - at 1,000 pulses for 200 seconds, with a, total ultraviolet light dose 5.4 J/cm2. This reduced the viability of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes inoculated on the surface of chicken by 2?2.4 log10 (N/N0) colony forming unit (cfu)/mL. It was further found that total aerobic mesophils on the surface of meat were diminished by 2 log10 (N/N0) cfu/mL. All experiments were performed under nonthermal conditions of less than 42C.
The method used also prevented the recovery of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes bacteria - a process known as photoreactivation. The high-power pulse light used had an advantage over conventional UV light as it ¡°induces extensive and unrepairable DNA damage, remarkably increasing the efficiency of the treatment¡±, said the research.
Lipid peroxidation
The study examined how far the pulsed light affected the organoleptic properties of the chicken though the process of lipid peroxidation. The team said that, in general, continuous UV light causes this process to occur because of the length of exposure time for the meat needed to kill bacteria. But they added that the high-power pulsed light ¡°can minimise this effect due to the short pulse duration¡±.
The high-power pulse technique must employ short exposures in order to be considered as a nonthermal process ? adding that the issue of avoiding thermal effects required a ¡°novel engineering approach and new design of equipment¡±.
High-power pulsed light for decontamination of chicken from food pathogens: a study on antimicrobial efficiency and organoleptic properties by E. Paskeviciute, I. Buchovec and Z. Luksiene
Source: Journal of Food Safety
doi:10.1111/j.1745-4565.2010.00267.x

Nanoparticle gives antimicrobial ability to fight Listeria longer
Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-12/pu-nga120710.php
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A Purdue University research team developed a nanoparticle that can hold and release an antimicrobial agent as needed for extending the shelf life of foods susceptible to Listeria monocytogenes.
Yuan Yao, an assistant professor of food science, altered the surface of a carbohydrate found in sweet corn called phytoglycogen, which led to the creation of several forms of a nanoparticle that could attract and stabilize nisin, a food-based antimicrobial peptide. The nanoparticle can then preserve nisin for up to three weeks, combating Listeria, a potentially lethal foodborne pathogen found in meats, dairy and vegetables that is especially troublesome for pregnant women, infants, older people and others with weakened immune systems.
Controlling Listeria at deli counters, for example, is especially problematic because meat is continually being opened, cut and stored, giving Listeria many chances to contaminate the food. Nisin alone is only effective at inhibiting Listeria for a short period - possibly only a few days - in many foods.
"People have been using nisin for a number of years, but the problem has been that it is depleted quickly in a food system," said Arun Bhunia, a Purdue professor of food science who co-authored a paper with Yao on the findings in the early online version of the Journal of Controlled Release. "This nanoparticle is an improved way to deliver the antimicrobial properties of nisin for extended use."
Yao used two strategies to attract nisin to the phytoglycogen nanopoarticles. First, he was able to negatively charge the surface of the nanoparticle and use electrostatic activity to attract the positively charged nisin molecules. Second, he created a partially hydrophobic condition on the surface of the nanoparticle, causing it to interact with partially hydrophobic nisin molecules. When the particles are hydrophobic, or repel water, they become attracted to each other.
"Both strategies may work together to allow nanoparticles to attract and stabilize nisin," Yao said, "This could substantially reduce the depletion of nisin in various systems."
For practical use, Yao said a solution containing the nanoparticles and free nisin could be sprayed onto foods or included in packaging. The solution requires a balance of free nisin and nisin on the nanoparticles.
"When you reduce the amount of free nisin, it will trigger a release of more nisin from the nanoparticles to re-establish the equilibrium," Yao said. "There will be a substantial amount of nisin preserved to counteract the Listeria."
Using a model, Yao said a sufficient amount of nisin to combat Listeria could be preserved for up to 21 days.
Yao and his colleagues are working on using other food-based antimicrobial peptides and nano-constructs to combat Listeria other foodborne pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7 and salmonella. The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Science Foundation funded their research.

Harmful Bacteria In Produce Cannot Hide From New Irradiation Technology
http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2010/12/articles/food-policy-regulation/harmful-bacteria-in-produce-cannot-hide-from-new-irradiation-technology//
Posted on December 6, 2010 by Colin Caywood
Researchers at AgriLife Research appear to have devised a new irradiation technique that effectively kills 99.9% of harmful bacteria, such as Salmonella and E. coli, while requiring only half the usual amount of irradiation, according to an article in today's Science Daily. The technique involves packing the produce in a Mylar bag filled with pure oxygen.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved the use of irradiation at dosages of up to 4,000 Gray on leafy greens such as spinach, said Dr. Carmen Gomes, AgriLife Research food safety engineer.
A Gray is a measure of ionizing radiation dose and it is equal to the absorption of 1 Joule of ionizing radiation by 1 kilogram of matter.
"That dosage was determined as what was necessary to achieve an 100,000-fold reduction of such pathogens as E. coli O157:H7 and salmonella," said Gomes, who is one of a three-member Texas AgriLife Food Safety Engineering Team. "However, we know based on previous research conducted by our group that above 1 kilo Gray (1,000 Gray) the quality of leafy vegetables starts to decay and they lose their freshness."
An 100,000-fold reduction corresponds to a 99.999 percent kill rate, according to Dr. Rosana Moreira, another member of the team.
"If you had 100,000 bacteria in your vegetable, it means you would end up with just one bacteria still living," Moreira said.
Despite the pathogen reduction benefits of irradiation, many consumers continue to express concern about the effect of radiation on the food. "Would it mean my lettuce is full of radiation?" The article does a nice job explaining why this process is not the equivalent of turning your salad into a green pile of radioactive waste:
Though being exposed to a Gray of radiation would be lethal for a human, the radiation leaves no residue on the vegetables, and the vegetables are perfectly safe for human consumption after the process, according to Gomes.
"It is analogous to the heat treatment when you expose milk, juices and cans of vegetables to very high temperatures for a period of time to kill pathogens," Gomes said. "If we humans were exposed to the same heat treatment we would suffer heat trauma as well. Moreover, the irradiating process is very well regulated. The energy of electrons we use is too low to produce radioactive materials."
Also, ionizing radiation it is not so likely to reduce nutrients such as chlorophyll, carotenoids and valuable antioxidants as thermal processes do, said Dr. Elena Castell-Perez , the third member of the team.
"Ionizing radiation can actually enhance some nutrients such as carotene and other antioxidants," Gomes said. "And irradiated food stays fresh longer."

Ten Years Later, They're Still Haunted by E. coli
Source: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2010/12/ten-years-later-theyre-still-haunted-by-e-coli/
by Ross Anderson | Dec 03, 2010

Ten years ago, the picturesque farming town of Walkerton, Ontario, was plunged into a nightmare of food poisoning that sickened 2,300 residents, killed seven, and terrorized the town and its surroundings for weeks.

Eventually, the horrific outbreak of E.coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter was blamed on a small herd of grass-fed cows, a poorly planned town well and water system managers who didn't take seriously the risks of foodborne illness.

Now, a decade later, Canadian researchers report that, in a very real sense, the epidemic continues. Hundreds of survivors who thought they had recovered are at far greater risk of hypertension, kidney disease and heart disease.

Walkerton is a quiet town of about 4,800 people, nestled alongside the Saugeen River in the rolling alfalfa fields near the eastern shores of Lake Huron. With its maple-lined streets, manicured lawns and brick storefronts, it could have been the set for Jimmy Stewart and "It's a Wonderful Life."

Until May of 2000, when it suddenly morphed into a science fiction horror story.

The first indications came Thursday, May 18, when 20 children were absent from a local school and two were admitted to the local hospital with bloody diarrhea. The next day, several residents of a retirement home fell ill with similar symptoms, and dozens more townspeople contacted their doctors about diarrhea, stomach pain and nausea.

A local pediatrician suspected E. coli, and alerted local health officials, who began to investigate. One official contacted Stan Koebel, manager of Walkerton's water system. Koebel, who was responsible for chlorinating and testing the water, reported the town water was "OK." Another call later Friday got the same response.

In fact, investigators later learned, one of the town wells had been operated without chlorination for nearly a week, and a routine test by a private laboratory had shown up positive for E. coli. But Koebel "withheld information from the health unit because he did not want health officials to know that he had operated without a chlorinator," investigators reported.

Meanwhile, the epidemic worsened, inundating the local hospital and those in nearby towns. On Sunday, authorities confirmed at least two cases of potentially deadly E.coli 0157:H7, and advised residents to boil their water before using it. The first person died on Monday, and six more in the following days. Others were evacuated by helicopter to larger hospitals to be placed on kidney dialysis.

Walkerton's tragedy became a huge news story in the Canadian press, with TV trucks, satellite dishes and floodlights on Main Street. Reporters depicted a small town under siege by a mysterious epidemic, standing-room-only crowds at the hospital and helicopters whoof-whoofing overhead.

By that time, Koebel had resumed chlorinating the town water. But it was too late. Nearly half the town had already been sickened, 500 of them showing up at the hospital on Tuesday alone. More than 20 children were on kidney dialysis machines.

Investigators showed up at Koebel's office and found that sanitation reports had been falsified and altered for months or years. And Koebel admitted that the water had tested positive for E. coli a week earlier, but he had not done anything about it.

A government investigation traced the epidemic to manure from a small farm adjacent to the town well just outside the town. The well was contaminated during heavy rains in the weeks preceding the outbreak, and the lack of chlorine sealed the town's fate.

Koebel and his brother, who also worked with the water utility, pleaded guilty to criminal charges stemming from the government investigation.

The Walkerton outbreak contradicted several myths or conventional wisdoms about E.coli 0157:H7 and foodborne illness in general. In the 1990s, E.coli outbreaks were mostly attributed to undercooked hamburger, often from American fast-food restaurants; Walkerton had nothing to do with hamburger, nor fast food, nor American cows.

It also contradicted the assumption that deadly E.coli O157:H7 is a byproduct of industrial-level cattle-raising and overcrowded feedlots. Walkerton's cows were happy, grassfed cows that lived in a peaceful pasture just outside the town.

And now, a 10-year study of 1,977 Walkerton residents suggests that foodborne illness has consequences that last far beyond a mere tummy ache and a bout of diarrhea. Conducted by doctors in London, Ontario, the study published in the British Medical Journal concluded that those who were sickened in 2000 experienced "an increased risk for hypertension, renal impairment and cardiovascular disease."

"Our findings underline the need for following up individual cases of food or water poisoning by E.coli O157:H7 to prevent or reduce silent progressive vascular injury," the researchers report. "These long term consequences emphasize the importance of ensuring safe food and water supply as a cornerstone of public health."

More stringent testing doesn¡¯t equal safer meat: study
MeatPoultry.com, December 9, 2010
by Bryan Salvage
Source: http://www.meatpoultry.com/
WASHINGTON ? No scientific basis was found that more stringent testing of meat purchased through the government's ground beef purchase program and distributed to various federal food and nutrition programs ? including the National School Lunch Program ? would lead to safer meat, a new National Research Council study concluded. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Agriculture.
The US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) buys ground beef from suppliers that must meet mandatory process, quality, traceback and handling controls plus comply with strict limitations on the amounts of bacteria in the meat, such as E. coli and Salmonella. AMS then distributes the ground beef to federal programs, including food banks, emergency feeding programs, Indian reservations and disaster-relief agencies.
In assessing AMS's ground-beef purchase program, the committee that wrote the report said validated cooking processes provide greater assurance of ground beef's safety than would additional testing for pathogens. Testing alone cannot guarantee the complete absence of pathogens because of statistical implications associated with how beef is sampled during testing.

The committee's analysis of the number of illnesses since 1998 linked with AMS ground beef provided to schools suggests outbreaks were rare events before AMS requirements became more stringent in February, implying controls already in place were appropriate for protecting public health. No recorded outbreaks of E. coli or Salmonella associated with AMS ground beef have occurred in more than a decade.
Prevention of future outbreaks will depend on eliminating contamination during production and ensuring meat is properly handled, stored and cooked before it is served, the committee said.
The committee also attempted to compare the AMS specifications with those of large industry purchasers of ground beef. Among purchasers, the committee found considerable differences in testing and safety standards and suspected that the intended use of the ground beef could account for the variations.
For example, all raw AMS ground beef is distributed in frozen form, but distributors of fresh meat products may require different standards designed to improve shelf-life. Although AMS safety requirements appear comparable to or more demanding than those of commercial companies on the surface, the lack of information detailing the science used for corporate specifications prevented the committee from making direct comparisons.
Other specifications under the AMS program call for testing food samples and surfaces at the suppliers to look for the presence of "indicator" microorganisms that could denote unsanitary conditions, improper hygiene and processing techniques, post-processing contamination and storage-temperature abuse. Although reducing the number of indicator organisms implies a reduction in the amount of pathogens, the presence of an indicator does not guarantee that a pathogen is also present, the committee said.
For an indicator to be an effective predictor of a pathogen's presence, a statistical association needs to be established. Therefore, the committee recommended that AMS assess the usefulness of its microbiological data as a scientific basis for testing for indicators.
"The report encourages AMS to strengthen its established specifications and requirements for ground beef by utilizing a transparent and clearly defined science-based process," said Gary Acuff, chair of the committee and professor and director of the Center for Food Safety at Texas A&M University, College Station.
The committee recommended AMS base its requirements on standards supported by the International Commission on Microbiological Safety of Foods, the Codex Alimentarius Commission and the Research Council report An Evaluation of the Role of Microbiological Criteria for Foods and Food Ingredients.

Food Safety Bill Passes House, Heads Back to Senate

Source: http://www.foodproductdesign.com/
WASHINGTON?The U.S. House of Representatives narrowly approved a $1.09 trillion appropriations bill Dec. 8 that funds the government for fiscal year 2011 and includes a sweeping overhaul of the nation¡¯s food safety system. It now goes to the Senate.
The House passed the bill, H.R. 3082, by a 212 to 206 vote. The measure, a so-called continuing resolution would keep the U.S. government operating at 2010 spending levels through most of next year, would cost taxpayers $45.9 billion less than the 2011 budget U.S. President Barack Obama had proposed.
Included in this legislation is the Senate¡¯s FDA Food Safety Modernization Act, which was passed last month; however, due to Constitutional requirements requiring spending bills to originate in the House of Representatives, the bill will now be sent back to the Senate for final passage.
The bill gives FDA greater authority to initiate recalls, rather than waiting for food companies to voluntarily recall food products. Food processors and farmers also would be required to develop strategies to prevent contaminations, and would be required to allow FDA access to all records.
The bill calls for the FDA to inspect at least 600 foreign food facilities within a year of enactment, and double its number of foreign inspections in each subsequent year for five years. The measure would require inspections every three years for U.S. manufacturing and processing plants the FDA views to be at a high risk for contamination, and every five years for all other domestic facilities. According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), 50,000 foreign and domestic food facilities would be inspected in 2015 by FDA or federal, state, local or foreign officials acting on FDA¡¯s behalf.
The legislation also would require most food producers to develop hazard prevention plans and would give the FDA access to those records when requested. Some local food producers with annual sales under $500,000 would be exempt from that rule under the Tester amendment.

2011 HACCP (Basic and Advanced)
Class Schedule
Basic HACCP Chicago, IL January 24 and 25, 2011
Basic HACCP
Camden, NJ February 7 and 8, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago February 21 and 22, 2011
Advanced HACCP Chicago February 23 and 24, 2011
Basic HACCP San Francisco February 28 and March 1, 2011
Basic HACCP Houston TX March 7 and 8, 2011
Basic HACCP Yuma AZ March 21 and 22, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL March 28 and 29, 2011
Basic HACCP Los Angeles CA April 4 and 5, 2011
Basic HACCP Ft Lauderdale FL April 11 and 12, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL April 25 and 26, 2011
Advanced HACCP Chicago April 27 and 28, 2011
Basic HACCP Visalia CA May 9 and 10, 2011
Advanced HACCP Visalia CA May 11 and 12, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL May 23 and 24, 2011
Basic HACCP Seattle WA June 6 and 7 2011
Basic HACCP Atlanta GA June, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL June 27 and 28, 2011
Advanced HACCP Chicago IL June 29 and 30, 2011
Basic HACCP Los Angeles July 11 and 12, 2011
Advanced HACCP Los Angeles July 13 and 14, 2011
Basic HACCP Camden NJ July 18 and 19, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL July 26 and 27, 2011
Basic HACCP Visalia CA August 1 and 2, 2011
Basic HACCP Houston TX August 15 and 16, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL August 29 and 30, 2011
Advanced HACCP Chicago IL August 31 and September 1, 2011

Basic HACCP Dallas TX September 12 and 13, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL September 26 and 27, 2011
Basic HACCP Ft Lauderdale FL October 10 and 11, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL October 24 and 25, 2011

Basic HACCP Camden NJ November 7 and 8, 2011
Basic HACCP Chicago IL November 28 and 29, 2011
Basic HACCP Los Angeles CA December 5 and 6, 2011
Basic HACCP Visalia CA December 12 and 13, 2011



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