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1/22, 2003
ISSUE: 43
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( BW)(NJ-BOC)(BOX) BOC Helps Bar-S Foods Improve Food Safety with Ozone and UV Light Technologies

Business Editors

MURRAY HILL, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jan. 21, 2003--Bar-S Foods Co., a nationally-branded hot dog and lunch meat processor, has installed BOC's ozonated wash system and ultra-violet (UV) light pathogen intervention technologies in its three food processing plants to help fight the battle against the food-borne pathogens such as listeria monocytogenes (listeria).
The Phoenix-based Bar-S Foods Co. has instituted one of the most aggressive food safety initiatives of any company in the ready-to-eat industry. Multiple pathogen intervention steps are applied during processing, the mainstay of which is ozone gas (O3) dissolved in water.
"Bar-S Foods Company is committed to the development and implementation of the best technologies and procedures to deliver the safest products to customers. This is accomplished through a multiple hurdle and intervention approach, of which ozone is an integral part," says Bob Reinhard, director of food safety and regulatory compliance for Bar-S Foods Co.
"We selected BOC because they have the experience, technology and product portfolio to meet our needs," said Danny Dupree, division vice president, plant operations, Bar-S Foods Co. "BOC is a leader in providing pathogen intervention strategies to the food processing industry. They understand our needs, know where we want to go and have the expertise and engineered solutions to help us get there."
Mark DiMaggio, business manager, food safety products, BOC, said, "Our long history with pathogen reduction applications in food processing plants allowed us to help Bar-S Foods Co. engineer their pathogen reduction strategy. They integrated ozone and UV technology into their plants' total environment to treat food, food contact surfaces, and processing fluids."
Listeria proliferates in the cool moist environments found in ready-to-eat meat plants. It is most often found around drain areas and evaporator coils and can precipitate from the air or be transferred to food contact surfaces and food products themselves by employees or plant equipment.
To combat this threat, Bar-S Foods Co. installed BOC's anti-microbial ozone wash systems in its Clinton, Lawton and Altus, Oklahoma processing plants. The wash systems introduce ozonated water on food-contact surfaces and on food itself to kill pathogens. Ozone is one of the world's most powerful oxidants, and has been proven to be safe and effective in controlling E. coli, listeria and other pathogens in food processing environments.
Food processors look to BOC for the engineered solutions they need to achieve total process control in their plants. BOC uses the best available services and technologies to help customers address all of their atmosphere, microbe and temperature control needs. Customers benefit from BOC's experience and expertise in providing a range of custom offerings, such as ozone and UV light technologies, cryogenic gases, modified atmosphere packaging, and water management services so they can deliver the highest quality food to their customers.
Bar-S Foods Co. is the manufacturer of over 100 processed meat items including bacon, lunchmeat, smoked sausage, and America's number one selling 12 oz. and 1 lb. hot dog. Bar-S is committed to producing delicious, high quality products, which has made them a recognized leader in the processed meat industry.
The Boc Group (NYSE:BOX), the worldwide industrial gases, vacuum technologies and distribution services company, serves two million customers in more than 50 countries. It employs 46,000 people and had annual sales of some $6 billion in 2002. Further information about The BOC Group may be obtained on the Internet at http://www.boc.com.

The difference between coliform and E.coli

http://portage.scwn.com/display/inn_news/news1.txt
Although they sound similar, coliform is not the same as E.coli, which is associated with fecal matter.
John Standridge, a water microbiologist at the state Lab of Hygiene, said coliform is used in water quality tests as a general indicator of contamination.
"It just tells you something funny is going on with the water," he said. "A positive coliform test doesn't mean everyone exposed to the water is going to get sick."
E.coli is one of several bacteria which are a subset of the overall coliform bacteria, Standridge explained. While E.coli is commonly found in the intestinal tract of warm-blooded mammals, and is a serious "red flag" for that reason, coliform is much more prevalent in the environment.
"All of us have billions of coliform bacteria around us, all the time," he said.
According to facilities manager Jon Bedessem, the water at Caledonia school has never tested positive for the fecal contaminant.
"We have never had an E.coli problem," he said.
The difference between coliform and E.coli
Although they sound similar, coliform is not the same as E.coli, which is associated with fecal matter.
John Standridge, a water microbiologist at the state Lab of Hygiene, said coliform is used in water quality tests as a general indicator of contamination.
"It just tells you something funny is going on with the water," he said. "A positive coliform test doesn't mean everyone exposed to the water is going to get sick."
E.coli is one of several bacteria which are a subset of the overall coliform bacteria, Standridge explained. While E.coli is commonly found in the intestinal tract of warm-blooded mammals, and is a serious "red flag" for that reason, coliform is much more prevalent in the environment.
"All of us have billions of coliform bacteria around us, all the time," he said.
According to facilities manager Jon Bedessem, the water at Caledonia school has never tested positive for the fecal contaminant.
"We have never had an E.coli problem," he said.

Nebraska Beef gets federal judge to stop USDA from inspection withdrawal
by Dan Murphy on 1/20/03 for www.meatingplace.com
A federal judge has temporarily enjoined the Food Safety and Inspection Service from shutting down the beef packer Nebraska Beef Ltd., which has been accused of violating food-safety regulations, according to news reports.
At a federal court hearing Jan. 16, USDA said it wanted the plant closed because the food safety system was inadequate and the company has not acted to correct the problem.
U.S. District Judge Joseph Batallion temporarily stopped the removal of inspectors late Tuesday. The judge said he agreed with Nebraska Beef's contention that the company could be put out of business if inspectors were withdrawn.
Nebraska Beef officials said the Omaha, Neb.-based firm could lose $2.7 million a day, and that 1,100 employees would be out of work if inspectors were allowed to shut down operations.
Nebraska Beef said in court documents that the company had, in fact, responded sufficiently to USDA's concerns and claimed that it had been subjected to unfair scrutiny and penalties not assessed other packing plants.
Nebraska Beef argued that the dispute started Aug. 30 when the USDA said it would assess Nebraska Beef's facilities and operations because the company had supplied beef trimmings to All American Meats. That company had been identified as the sole supplier of meat found to be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.
Nebraska Beef denied the allegations, saying that All American Beef, which operates as a subsidiary company, was not the sole supplier of the ground beef product found to be contaminated.
Since then the FSIS has twice suspended inspection at Nebraska Beef, shutting the Omaha plant down for in December for one day and for three days in September.

ACRYLAMIDE AND FOOD: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
January, 2002
Health Canada
Source from :http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/
What is acrylamide?
Acrylamide is a chemical that is produced for use in the manufacture of plastics as well as various other materials. While acrylamide is used in making some food packaging, this use has not been found to add acrylamide to foods at levels that could pose a health concern. Acrylamide is also used in the production of polyacrylamide, several types of copolymers, and synthetic rubber. Polyacrylamide is used as a coagulant
in drinking water and also in grouts used in the construction of drinking water reservoirs and wells. Acrylamide is not a substance that is added to foods. In April 2002, research results announced by the Swedish National Food Authority which have been confirmed by Health Canada showed that acrylamide can be produced in certain starch-based foods, such as potato
chips and french fries when they have been cooked at high temperatures. Very recently, Health Canada scientists discovered the most significant way by which acrylamide forms in foods. Does acrylamide pose a cancer risk to humans?
Based on animal studies, acrylamide has been categorized as a probable cause of cancer in humans. However, these animal tests and their relevance to human health has not been established. It is not known whether or not acrylamide levels found in food pose an actual human health risk.
Studies on acrylamide associated with human cancer in workers who are exposed to acrylamide in their occupations is limited, therefore, more studies in animal models and humans is necessary to better understand the potential for acrylamide to cause cancer in humans. What has Health Canada been doing following the findings of the Swedish National Food Authority?
Health Canada conducted preliminary analytical studies to confirm the Swedish findings. This included identifying foods in the Canadian food supply that may contain acrylamide. We first looked at those foods that contained readily detectable levels of acrylamide according to the Swedish results. The list of foods includes potato chips, french fries, cookies processed cereals, and bread. We found our results to be consistent with
those of Sweden, as well as Norway, the United Kingdom and the United States. Health Canada also looked at some other foods that are processed at high temperatures like coffee and roasted almonds, and found that acrylamide, in wide-ranging concentrations, is present in a number of foods cooked at higher temperatures, with the exception of foods that are boiled. However, we also found that the levels of acrylamide can vary
considerably from one sample to the next, even in the same product from the same manufacturer. Health Canada has been concentrating its efforts on finding how acrylamide forms in foods and ways to reduce it. Our scientists found that acrylamide forms from compounds already in the food.
This occurs when "asparagine", a naturally occurring amino acid, reacts with natural sugars in food at temperatures used in baking or frying, and this then forms acrylamide. This reaction is responsible for most of the acrylamide in food. When Health Canada scientists made this discovery, it was announced to the international scientific community and the food industry.
Has Health Canada identified the names of product brands that when tested during the research, showed high levels of acrylamide? No, the findings of Health Canada's research were very preliminary. Health Canada's testing ?and tests in other countries ?have demonstrated that the level of acrylamide can vary from one sample to the next, even in the same product from the same manufacturer. For example, one brand of potato chips
found to contain a certain level of acrylamide one week may be found to contain a very different level the next. In general, it does appear that, of the foods tested by Health Canada,
potato chips and french fries tend to contain the most acrylamide, while much lower levels were found in soft breads and cereals. These data are not sufficient however, to reliably identify a specific brand of product as having a higher or lower level of acrylamide What is Health Canada's relationship with the food industry on this issue? Health Canada has shared its research findings on the formation of acrylamide with the Canadian food industry and our international scientific
partners. Health Canada is working with the food industry and our health authority counterparts in other countries to find ways of minimizing acrylamide levels in food. Scientists at Health Canada are focussing their research on the factors that
influence the formation of acrylamide in food.What is Health Canada doing to protect the health and safety of Canadians?
Health Canada's number one priority is protecting the health and safety of Canadians. This is the case with all food and food related issues. In these areas, Health Canada toxicologists, epidemiologists, molecular biologists, microbiologists, chemists and nutritionists work hard to protect and improve
Canadians' health through science-based policies and programs. Decisions made by Health Canada must be science-based, and on this issue, we are doing the necessary scientific assessment and studies before we issue any further
advice to Canadians. As new information on acrylamide and food becomes available, we are making it available to Canadians. What advice does Health Canada have for Canadians Canadians should eat a balanced diet in accordance with Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating. This advice is consistent with advice provided by the United States Food and Drug Administration and other international bodies, such as United Kingdom Food Standards Agency, Sweden's National Food Administration, and was a recommendation from the World Health Organization and the Food and Agricultural Organization expert consultation on acrylamide.
Did Health Canada advise specific manufacturers of the products it sampled on the high levels of acrylamide in their products?
No. Information on the levels of acrylamide in specific brand named foods has not been released because the findings are very preliminary. Health Canada could not state with certainty that the level of acrylamide found in a specific brand of food was representative of that food or brand. Health Canada advised the Canadian food industry that levels of acrylamide in foods sold in Canada are similar to findings generated in other countries. Health Canada has also advised industry about the results of our research on how acrylamide is formed in some foods, so that industry can take action to minimize acrylamide levels in the products they manufacture.
What is Health Canada doing with industry regarding the levels of acrylamide in their products?
Health Canada is working with scientists in the food industry to find ways of lowering the levels of acrylamide in foods. This work was initiated as a precautionary measure even before the potential risk to consumers can be fully characterized. Health Canada's research aims to provide the food industry with tools to minimize acrylamide levels. For example, reducing
cooking temperatures used in processing foods may achieve lower levels of acrylamide.
What Can You Do?
Health Canada advises that, on the basis of the information available to date, there is no need to make major dietary changes. Canadians should eat a balanced diet in accordance with Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating. This
advice is consistent with that provided by the United States Food and Drug Administration and other international bodies, such as United Kingdom Food Standards Agency, Sweden's National Food Administration, and was a recommendation from the World Health Organization and the Food and Agricultural Organization expert consultation on acrylamide.
Background information on acrylamide
How and when was acrylamide found in certain foods?
In late April (2002), the Swedish National Food Authority announced that researchers from Stockholm University had discovered elevated levels of acrylamide in starch-based foods that had been cooked at high temperatures (greater than 120 degrees Celsius). Since the Swedish National Food Authority announced its findings, similar findings have been reported in other countries. By September 30, (2002), Health Canada had conducted its preliminary analytical studies in order to verify the Swedish findings by looking at Canadian foods that may contain acrylamide. In doing so, Health Canada studies confirmed the Swedish results. Health Canada had also started to
investigate how acrylamide is formed in food. Our scientists discovered a possible route for the formation of acrylamide, involving a reaction at high temperatures between the amino acid "asparagine" and the sugar glucose in baked or fried carbohydrate-rich foods, such as potatoes. This information may provide a key as to how the presence of acrylamide in
foods can be minimized. Health Canada advised industry and interested associations of these findings. As well, Health Canada posted information on its website.
On December 4, (2002), the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released the results of their analysis of french fries, potato chips, bakery and cereal products and other foods for the presence of acrylamide. The results revealed that acrylamide levels can vary considerably depending on
the type of food and the cooking conditions. The highest acrylamide levels were found in potato chips and other high-carbohydrate foods that are cooked longer at higher temperatures. These findings are consistent with analytical
results generated by Health Canada to date. Further research is being done by Health Canada and in other countries to investigate ways of minimizing acrylamide levels in foods.
Relevant Links Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hpfb-dgpsa/onpp-bppn/food_guide_e.html
FAO/WHO Consultation on the Health Implications of Acrylamide in Food,
Geneva, 25-27 June, 2002, Summary Report
ftp://ftp.fao.org/es/esn/jecfa/acrylamide_2002-09-16.pdf
The Swedish National Food Administration Press Release: Acrylamide in Food
http://www.fsai.ie/rapid_alerts/alerts/NFA_Acrylamide250402.pdf
United States Food and Drug Administration(FDA): Exploratory Data on
Acrylamide in Foods http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/acrydata.html

Current Outbreaks
01/21. SALMONELLOSIS, RAW MILK - USA (OHIO)
01/21. Tenth E. Coli Case Linked To Cheese
01/20. Eyot Creek cheese tests positive for E. coli
01/20. E. coli outbreak could lead to lawsuit for county

01/17. Young's to stop selling, using unpasteurized milk
01/17. Knife linked to E. coli outbreak
01/17. Couple to sue for pork roll compo
01/17. Aust swim team falls ill
01/17. Man dies, restaurant to be sued
01/17. Baby sitter accused of poisoning three children

01/16. GASTRO OUTBREAK: CORONER STEPS IN
01/16. SALMONELLA MONTEVIDEO OUTBREAK ASSOCIATED WITH EGYPTIAN
01/16. TAINTED CHEESE TOLL GROWS
01/16. Significant increase in bacterial infection reported in Dela
01/16. Pre-graduation trips come to a halt after food poisoning
01/16. Pork rolls death probe

Current Food Recall
01/21. Elan Nutrition LLC Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Peanut in Ultimate Lo Carb Barʂ
01/21. Elan Nutrition Has Recalled Ultimate Lo Carb Barʂ -Chocolate Brownie Jan 21
01/20. Pinnacle Foods Has Recalled "Hearty Hero Cheeseburger Sandwich" Jan 17
01/17. Undeclared peanut protein in HAITAI ALMOND CRACKER
01/17. Pinnacle Foods Has Recalled Sandwiches Jan 16
01/17. Undeclared Egg in "Hearty Hero Sandwiches"

01/16. T. Marzetti Has Recalled 12 Oz Bottles of Salad Dressing
01/16. T. Marzetti Co. Recalls 12 Oz Bottles of Salad Dressing Due to Undeclared Anchovies
01/16. Bear Creek Stores Has Recalled Harry and David Truffle Assortment
01/15. Bear Creek Stores, Inc. Dba, Harry and David Issues Allergy Alert


Current USDA/FDA News
Risk reduction strategies for potential BSE pathways involving downer cattle and dead stock
Positive E. coli O157:H7 Test Results: Updated January 17, 2003
Public Meeting To Address Agenda For Codex Alimentarius Commission
USDA Marks Progress On BSE Prevention Action Steps;
Questions and Answers about Dioxins
Public Meeting To Address Codex Committee On Food Additives And Contaminants
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated January 15, 2003
Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002

Current Food Safety News
01/21. RISK REDUCTION STRATEGIES FOR POTENTIAL BSE PATHWAYS INVOLVI
01/21. PILGRIM'S PRIDE MEAT RECALL CREATES CRISIS FOR PITTSBURG, TE
01/21. ACRYLAMIDE AND FOOD: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
01/21. Nebraska Beef gets federal judge to stop USDA from inspectio
01/21. USDA seeks comments for Codex food additives committee meeti

01/20. Eat , drink ... and be sick
01/20. Are You Better Safe Than Sorry?
01/20. 6th BSE cow got feed from same plant as others
01/20. Mad cow investigation starts
01/20. BEEF INDUSTRY SHRUGS OFF LATEST JAPAN MAD COW CASE
01/20. INSPECTORS SHUT DIPAOLO'S; BIRD DROPPINGS FOUND IN BREAD
01/20. NOW IS THE TIME TO CONTEST FOOD-IRRADIATION PROPOSALS

01/19. Keep Antibiotics Working Praises McDonald's Support of FDA B
01/19. The difference between coliform and E.coli
01/19. Former ConAgra beef plant broke food safety regulations befo
01/19. Schnucks supermarket this weekend will begin offering irradi
01/19. BRITAIN'S WORST FARMER

01/18. Bar-S Foods Improve Food Safety with Ozone and UV Light Tech
01/18. WANTED: FOOD SAFETY EXPERTS
01/18. EU Food Safety Authority seeks scientists
01/18. Technologies Available to Make Food Supply Safer
01/18. Accused spy tells of military food-poisoning plan

01/17. USDA Marks Progress On BSE Prevention Action Steps;
01/17. MORE THAN 10% OF PERISHABLE FOOD LABELS FAIL TO COMPLY
01/17. USE OF LATEX GLOVES CAN KILL
01/17. COMMENTARY: ConAgra finally hitching cart to horse in wake o
01/17. Three cases of BSE disclosed this week
01/17. US and Russia Talk on Poultry Exports
01/17. Knife linked to E. coli outbreak
01/17. UK Food Standards Agency issues call for tenders
01/17. Cleaning Up Cattle -
01/17. 3 Minnesota school districts to consider irradiated lunches

01/16. NEW FOOD SCIENCE EDUCATION JOURNAL POSTED
01/16. USDA TO HOLD MEETING ON CODEX ADDITIVES ACTIONS
01/16. MYCOTOXINS: RISKS IN PLANT, ANIMAL, AND HUMAN SYSTEMS
01/16. QE2 FAILS HEALTH INSPECTION, BUT CAN KEEP SAILING
01/16. POWERFUL DISINFECTANT USED TO STOP SPREAD OF NORWALK VIRUS
01/16. BSE CASES FALLING
01/16. Food safety in The Bahamas
01/16. Swift beefs-up safety at Greeley plant
01/16. USDA increases testing for mad cow
01/16. Beetle may help alleviate Crypto pollution, researchers say
01/16. Chief of meat plant strives for safety
01/16. Kissimmee lab to battle dangers to food supply
01/16. Food Standards Agency launches 'on-farm' information days to
01/16. Food safety bill moves -
01/16. DeCA's Web site posts food safety information
01/16. Food safety course scheduled for Jan. 29-30 at Annex 1
01/16. Public getting more food-savvy, poll shows

Beating Listeria Regrowth
Researchers in the USA discover new products to help the meat industry fight Listeria.
http://www.meatnews.com/
Researchers at Texas A&M University in the USA have discovered a new organic acid that could be used to help kill Listeria pathogens. The researchers looked into way of preventing the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in refrigerated, ready-to-eat foods such as frankfurters and cold meats, which they said could be a problem.
If these products are cooked well the Listeria is killed, however, there may be a risk of surface contamination at some point between the cooking and packaging stages, the research team said.
Lactic acid and sodium lactate are both known to inhibit organisms such as L. monocytogenes, but are not completely effective against regrowth.
Now the team from Texas A&M University has found promising results from a novel organic-acid, calcium-sulphate combination for surface treatment of ready-to-eat products. The product not only kills the Listeria on the food surface but has a long-lasting residual effect that prevents its regrowth.
According to Professor Jimmy Keeton, the sensory and physical properties of meat products are changed only a little by acidified calcium sulphate.Treated frankfurters had a slightly lower pH and slightly increased calcium content, but tasted the same. The product could be particularly useful as an additional measure in meat-processing factories, where prevention of cross-contamination is a constant concern.A summary of the research has been submitted to the USDA Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) as supporting evidence for use of the material. The USDA is in the process of considering the control of L. monocytogenes in processing plants. A directive issued in November requires meat-processing plants producing high- and medium-risk ready-to-eat products such as hot dogs and deli meats that do not already have a valid testing regime for Listeria to be subject to an intensified testing programme by the USDA FSIS.
Web posted: January 14, 2003
Category: Food Safety,Research
harris@wattpub.demon.co.uk

Biotrace updates hygiene software
http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/
21/01/03 - In the UK, Biotrace has launched Biotrack+ Multilingual, the latest version of its hygiene monitoring software.
The new multilingual version allows users to work in English, Spanish, Italian, French or German ?and the language can be selected at the touch of a button. The original software in English was launched 18 months ago and, according to Biotrace, has proved to be a popular choice for customers all over the world.
Biotrack+ enables companies to produce both basic reports such as the hygiene status of a production line over time, or more sophisticated analyses such as which Critical Control Points (CCPs) fail hygiene tests the most. Data filtering allows specific aspects of the data to be analysed, and can be used to create management reports easily.

Providing a range of options, Biotrace claims that its software allows users to produce tailor-made reports to match their requirements. Additional comments can be stored against each result, and data can be imported and compared from different sites.

Colin Hunt, product manager at Biotrace commented: ďWe are very proud to have improved the hygiene monitoring software still further. At Biotrace we always aim to deliver today what our customers will need tomorrow. We have applied these same principles to the development of Biotrack+ Multilingual, which is why it is second to none in terms of its ability to deliver what customers want.?br>
Biotrace International is a leading manufacturer and distributor of industrial and medical microbiology products for the food safety, industrial healthcare and defence markets. Headquartered in the UK, the company has subsidiaries in North America and France and a comprehensive international representation of over 90 distributors worldwide.

 

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