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2/3, 2003
ISSUE: 46
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METHODS

EXTENDING THE SHELF-LIFE OF CHEESES
January 2003
Oresund Food Excellence
Hard cheeses packed in material made from biobased polymers which will give
them an extended shelf-life may become a reality within short. A research
project called ³?, taking place at The Royal Veterinary and
Agricultural University (KVL) in Copenhagen as well as other institutes and
companies in Europe, continues to show promising results. It is working
towards a new approach to the use of oxygen scavengers, and other
preservatives, as active, protective agents in a new biobased packaging
material made from polylactate (PLA). The material is based on lactic acid,
produced from lactic acid bacteria from corn. The objective is to extend the
shelf-life of cheese from 2-3 months up to 9 months.
The extension of shelf-life does not require more food additives in the
foodstuff itself. The project concentrates on the packaging material.
Biobased food packaging materials are materials derived from renewable
sources and these materials can be used for food applications.
?Cheese is a living product, which soaks in oxygen and sends out carbon
dioxide. This combination often means that the cheese blows up and thereby
it is easier to puncture the packaging. With the biobased packaging, more
carbon dioxide can ooze out and prevent the cheese from blowing up,?says
Vibeke Kistrup Haugaard (KVL) from the group of researchers involved in the
project.
The new technology developed, and knowledge obtained from the Biopack
project, will also be applicable in other bio packaging concepts.
The impact of the research results is substantial. Extended shelf life
improves potential for overseas exports. Moreover, it leads to an extension
of the shelf-life after opening the packaging material at home, because of
the incorporation of the active components in the packaging. This will
reduce the growth of moulds and development of rancid taste. Additionally,
substituting fossil plastic materials by renewable biobased polymers may
benefit the environment and at the same time improve the utilization of
agricultural by-products.
The pilot project is to be completed in August 2004.


E. COLI O157 TEST RECEIVES AOAC CERTIFICATION
GAITHERSBURG
,
Md.-- IGEN International, Inc. announced today that its
PATHIGEN E. coli O157 test, based on the Company's proprietary ORIGEN(R)
technology, has earned the Performance Tested Method certificate of the AOAC
Research Institute (AOAC RI).

BIO FIRM GOES OFF TO MARKET
Officials with Bio-ID Diagnostic Inc. were cited as saying that genetic
fingerprinting of microbial organisms can offer the food industry and
consumers better assurance that there are no dangerous pathogens in our food
supply, and that the company is ready to take its patented Multigen
technology to the commercial marketplace.

Pathogen Test to Detect E. coli in Meat

Strategic Diagnostics Inc. (Nasdaq: SDIX), a leading provider of antibody products and analytical test kits for the food safety and water quality markets, today announced the completion of evaluations performed by major independent laboratories on SDI's RapidChek(R) test for E. coli O157.

Biotrace updates hygiene software
The new multilingual version allows users to work in English, Spanish, Italian, French or German ?and the language can be selected at the touch of a button. The original software in English was launched 18 months ago

Old clothes filter out cholera
Using old saris to filter drinking water collected from rivers and ponds has halved the number of cholera cases in remote Bangladeshi villages.

Clothes clean drinking water
Filtering drinking water from rivers and ponds through a folded piece of cotton cloth could cut disease by half in cholera-plagued countries, a new field study suggests.

Positive E. coli Test Results: Updated January 27, 2003

 

WHO issues alert on food terrorism

There have been attempts to contaminate food
By Emma Jane Kirby
BBC Geneva correspondent
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/2714951.stm
The World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that terrorist groups could try to contaminate food supplies and has urged countries to strengthen their surveillance.
There has already been some examples of deliberate contamination of the food chain. It's only very few, but there has been some examples
WHO report
In a special report, the leading UN health agency, said an attack using chemical or biological agents in food could lead to people dying or contracting serious illnesses like cancer.
The agency said it had not received any specific warnings of such an attack.
But it added that it viewed deliberate food contamination as "a real and current threat".
'Potential is there'
The 45-page booklet entitled Terrorist Threats to Food warns of the potential insertion of pesticides, viruses and parasites in food as "a way of deliberately harming civilian populations".
It cites examples of intentional food attacks of the past, including a salmonella outbreak in the US state of Oregon.
In that incident, more than 750 people became ill, after members of a cult contaminated restaurant salad bars.
The WHO director of food safety, Jurgen Schlundt, said the booklet was not designed to alarm but rather to try to alert governments to boost their surveillance and emergency response measures.
"There have already been some examples of deliberate contamination of the food chain. It's only very few, but there have been some examples. And we do know that the potential is there," he said.
"The way to try to deal with it is to strengthen some of the systems that we already have in place, but they need in some cases strengthening of certain areas."
Mr Schlundt added that natural outbreaks show the potential dangers of food-borne disease.
He said about 1.5 million people already die each year due to diarrhoea-related illnesses caught from eating contaminated food.
The WHO says if terrorists deliberately add harmful agents, many more people could be left suffering from acute long-term effects, including paralysis, foetal abnormalities and increased rates of chronic illnesses like cancer.
See also:
04 Oct 01 | Health
Rapid food poisoning analysis
04 Feb 01 | Health
Fears over food poisoning
10 Feb 01 | Health
Salmonella infection cases drop
12 Feb 01 | Health
Faster detection of food poisoning
26 Jun 02 | Science/Nature
Unhealthy glow signals bioterror
14 Mar 01 | Health
Rinsing process 'kills chicken bugs'
01 Nov 01 | Americas
Analysis: Threat from disease weapons
Internet links:
WHO
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
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TAKING ON BACTERIA AND MICRO-ORGANISMS
February 1, 2003
Fort Murray Today
12
Mary Fedun
Health Canada is, according to this story, proposing to allow irradiation of four new foods. They will be frozen ground beef, fresh and frozen poultry, packaged fresh, frozen, prepared and dried shrimp and prawns and mangoes. To date, irradiation has been approved for potatoes, onions, wheat, flour, whole wheat flour, whole and ground spices and dehydrated seasonings.
Irradiation prolongs the life of foods by destroying bacteria, moulds and yeast. It can also control infestation of insects and parasites. Radiation increases the shelf life of fruits and vegetables by slowing down ripening and sprouting. The Sierra Club of Canada claims that food irradiation damages some vitamins, amino acids and fatty acids. Others insist that research has found no adverse effects leaving no radioactive residue, but destroys about 10 per cent of vitamins A, B1,E and K, about the same amount lost in freezing and canning. The story says that food preservation has come a long way to ensure that it
is safe for human consumption. During the "Dark Ages" where there was no refrigeration, canning processes or even the knowledge of pasteurization, no doubt that many people succumbed to food-borne diseases. Spices were used a great deal to mask the flavour of rancid and spoiling food. The life expectancy at that time was a mere 40 years. We are indeed fortunate to have such good, safe food to eat. All irradiated foods must be labeled with a distinctive logo "radura" to identify that the product has been irradiated. Health and safety authorities in at least 39 countries have approved irradiation for a total of 40 different foods from spices to grain, boneless chicken and fruits and vegetables. Recent surveys in the U.S. shows that consumers are willing to purchase irradiated foods.
Most consumers are interested in the process that eliminates harmful microbes and reduces the risk of food-borne diseases. Nothing can guarantee food safety, but food irradiation reduces the bacteria and micro-organisms that may be present. Irradiated food must still be handled with care to prevent re-contamination.

USDA plans tougher enforcement of food safety measures
By LANCE GAY, Scripps Howard News Service
Saturday February 01, 2003, 04:38:00 PM
http://www.bakersfield.com/
WASHINGTON (SH) - Huge meat recalls last year show that meat plants aren't doing enough to keep dangerous food pathogens out of the food supply and new efforts will be required this year to ensure facilities are following proper safety procedures, a top Agriculture Department official said.
Elsa Murano, Agriculture undersecretary for food safety, said in an interview this week that she is not satisfied meat processors and federal meat inspectors are doing enough to ensure that food pathogens are kept out of the food supply. She said the government will bolster safety programs aimed at detecting dangerous pathogens like E. coli before meat gets to supermarket shelves.
"It's a war on pathogens - that's what it means," Murano said. "We have to break this cycle so we do not have these multimillion-pound recalls."
In the budget President Bush will present to Congress on Monday, the Agriculture Department is seeking to increase its budget for food safety programs by $112 million to $800 million next year.
The added funding is earmarked to test for pathogens and to provide more inspectors and specialized training for food inspectors. The inspectors also will be given new training to counter terrorists who could attempt to put exotic pathogens in the food supply.
Murano said federal inspection programs will require processing plants to show they have adequate sanitation programs to detect and combat troublesome food pathogens like E. coli and listeria. Inspectors also will make sure that equipment designed to deal with the pathogens is working properly.
The most dangerous E. coli pathogen, known under its strain name as E. coli OH:157, was discovered in 1980. Murano said high levels of recalls demonstrate that it's not that rare anymore. Veterinarians estimate that a quarter of the cattle going to slaughter today could be infected with the virulent E. coli strain, which grows in the gut of cattle.
The outbreak last June of E.coli OH:157 contamination traced to ground beef produced in Greeley, Colo., prompted the Agriculture Department to order the recall of 19 million pounds of beef - the second-largest beef recall in the agency's history. At least 42 people in 23 states were sickened, and scientists believe one death may have been linked.
Murano said processing facilities this year will be required to modify the current federal inspection program known by an unwieldy name - the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points program, or HACCP. The plants must have specific plans for reducing E.coli contamination, and federal inspectors will ensure that the plans are followed.
"I don't believe that processing plants are doing everything they can," Murano said. "They have got to be active and we have to be very active. To win this war, we have to pull out all of the stops and be as aggressive as possible."
Murano said she has not decided how to handle the problem of listeria, which prompted a recall of 28 million pounds of prepared meats in October. While E. coli grows in the gut of animals, listeria grows in meatpacking plants. Its spread prompted government directives for increased testing and a review of sanitation plans. The agency is studying a Clinton-era plan to require all plants to test for listeria. Some meat packers complain that the E. coli directive marks a return to pre-1990 days, when the food inspection agency imposed policies on meat packers. On the other hand, public interest groups say the government needs to establish standards for the industry to meet, rather than leaving it to the plants to come up with plans.Felicia Nestor of the Government Accountability Project, a Washington interest group that follows food safety issues, said more sweeping changes are needed, including the establishment of federal standards of food safety. "The fatal flaw of HACCP is that it is standardless," she said. "Until they come up with effective changes, we're just waiting for a repeat of what happened last summer."

Food Industry Seen Embracing Irradiation
Sat February 1, 2003 09:06 PM ET
By Jerry Bieszk

http://asia.reuters.com/
CHICAGO (Reuters) - Stung by record recalls of tainted meat last year, the U.S. food industry is stepping up the use of new technology to irradiate meat as an extra protection against deadly bacteria such as E. coli and listeria.
Just a small part of the 9 billion pounds of ground beef sold in the United States last year was irradiated, but the amount is growing rapidly, despite concerns voiced by some consumer groups about the unknown long-term effects on health.
"I would estimate the total volume currently being irradiated under 5 percent (of beef production), but we are anticipating an exponential growth curve," said Janet Riley, spokeswoman for the American Meat Institute (AMI).
Irradiation exposes products to ionizing radiation that kills insects, molds and bacteria. The U.S. government approved irradiation treatment of ground beef in January 2000, and the first batch was processed in May of that year.


SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS IS THAT IRRADIATION IS SAFE
January 30, 2003
Farmscape Episode 1168
A Researcher with the University of Guelph says the scientific consensus is
that the use of irradiation, to kill pathogenic bacteria in food, is safe.
The use of irradiation has been approved in Canada for spices, potatoes and
onions since the 1960s and Health Canada is now proposing expanding the list
to include ground beef, poultry, prawns and mangos. Public meetings to
discuss the proposal and gather input are underway now. University of
Guelph Food Safety Network Scientific Director Dr. Doug Powell says numerous
studies have shown irradiation to be a safe process.
Clip-Dr. Doug Powell-University of Guelph
The process has been well studied for the last 50 years. It's a very safe
process. Some critics suggest that there are certain classes of chemicals
formed in irradiation that may carry some theoretical risk. The European
government is looking at this but Canadian and American scientists looked at
that and do not agree. Cooking in any way...any processing of foods causes
chemicals to be formed. Irradiation does as well. Many of these chemicals
have been studied in long term feeding studies with rodents and other
animals and the consensus is that this is a safe process. Especially when
you compare the long term theoretical risk with the two to seven million
Canadians that get sick each year from the food and water they consume, I
think that we have a responsibility to at least explore what technologies
are out there that can reduce that burden.
Dr. Powell says, since 2000, consumers in the United States concerned over
food borne illness have embraced irradiated ground beef. He stresses the
use of irradiation does not absolve producers or processors of their
sanitary obligations. He says it's simply one more tool the food industry
can use to fight the bacteria responsible for food poisoning. For
Farmscape.Ca, I'm Bruce Cochrane.
*Farmscape is a presentation of Sask Pork and Manitoba Pork Council

ONLINE-Slides

Practical Application of Risk Analysis
George Davey CEO & Chris Chan, Director Science & Risk Management, SafeFood NSW
Click here to see the slides (Wait for 30-40 sec. after click) (ONLY with Microsoft Explorer)

Preharvest food safety - Milk and Dairy Beef Quality Assurance Program R Wallace
Source from: http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu
Click here to see the slides

Implementing A HACCP System in Your Food Service Operation
Source: http://www.cfs.purdue.edu (by Hospitality & Tourism Management)
Click here to see the slides
(ONLY with Microsoft Explorer)

Science/Technology of Irradiation
Source: http://foodsafety.cas.psu.edu (by Dr. C. Cutter)
Click here to see the slides
(ONLY with Microsoft Explorer)

Sanitation Training
Source: http://www.cfs.purdue.edu/
Click here to see the slides
(ONLY with Microsoft Explorer)


Development and implementation of HACCP in processing plants

Source from : MS Brewer http://www.cvm.uiuc.edu
Click here to see the slides

Preharvest water and Food Safety
obtained from UC Davis (UCgaps) - http://ucgaps.ucdavis.edu (Trevor V. Suslow, Ph.D.)
Click here to see the slides (PDF fil

 

Current Outbreaks
02/03. PROCESSED CHEESE ONLY FOR GIRL WHO SURVIVED DEADLY E.COLI
02/03. ONE DIED, 195 FELL ILL FROM PORK ROLLS IN AUSTRALIA: LAWYERS
02/03. Class action against restaurant
02/02. SICK CRUISE
02/02. SALMONELLOSIS: WASHINGTON AND IDAHO
02/01. E. COLI INFECTION: ONTARIO
02/01. BOTULISM, BOTTLED GARLIC - DENMARK
02/01. Salmonella suspected in jail outbreak

01/30. HAGGIS ONE OF 4 SUSPECTS IN E. COLI OUTBREAK; 55 FALL ILL AF -
01/29. E. COLI OUTBREAK FOLLOWED CITY HEALTH INSPECTION
01/29. FOOD POISONING, SCHOOL CHILDREN - COLOMBIA (CALI)
01/29. Temburong Jungle Visit Lands 30 Koreans In Hospital

Current Food Recall
02/03. OPIE¡¯S QUALITY MEATS HAGGIS may contain E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria
02/02. Undeclared peanut protein in SILANG BRAND CRACKERS and BISCUITS

01/31. Ohio company recalling 250 ice cream packages with undeclare
01/31. Undeclared sulphites in SAHHA BRAND JAMS and MARMELADES
01/31. Puerto Rico Firm Has Recalled Pork Product Jan 29
01/31. Puerto Rico Firm Expands Recall Of Pork Products For Possible Listeria Contamination
01/30. Ho's Trading Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Peanuts in Candy
01/30. Ampacco Has Recalls Always Save Taco Seasoning Mix Due to Unlabeled Wheat, Soy,
01/30. Puerto Rico Firm Has Recalled Pork Product Jan 29
01/30. Ho's Trading Has Recalled Master Chao Candy Jan 29
01/30. Ampacco Has Recalled ALWAYS SAVE TACO SEASONING MIX Jan 29


Current USDA/FDA News
Newsletters and Listservs
Registration of Food Facilities Under the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness
Prior Notice of Imported Food Under the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness
Food Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting
OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated January 31, 2003
25th (Extraordinary) Session of the Codex Alimentarius Commission
Meeting of the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods
Codex Ad Hoc Intergovernmental Task Force on Foods Derived from Biotechnology

Current Food Safety News
02/03. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH FOOD AND DRUGS ACT: FOOD AND DRUG REGUL
02/03. 'ONLY VIGILANCE & CONSTANT PROTEST' WILL KEEP GOVERNMENTS
02/03. TAKING ON BACTERIA AND MICRO-ORGANISMS
02/03. HAZARDOUS TASTE
02/03. USDA says Pilgrim's Pride not largest meat recall

02/02. MICE POO FOUND IN POPCORN
02/02. WHO issues alert on food terrorism
02/02. USDA plans tougher enforcement of food safety measures
02/02. Food Industry Seen Embracing Irradiation

02/01. Stop & Shop Offers Customers a New Food Option
02/01. Single food safety agency by 2005
02/01. Guest editorial: Meat safety at risk
02/01. Farmers face jail in tough new EU food laws
02/01. Class action against restaurant
02/01. Ministry says 50% of food poisoning not reported

01/31. AUDIT REPORTS FOR EXETER AND WORCESTER COUNCILS PUBLISHED
01/31. DEADLY ALLERGIES: PRIVATE MEMBER'S BILL WOULD REQUIRE SCHOOL
01/31. IRRADIATION CONCERNS -
01/31. NO CREDIBLE EVIDENCE THAT ACRYLAMIDE IN FOODS POSES HUMAN CA
01/31. HEALTH CANADA CONSULTATIONS ON IRRADIATION
01/31. SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS IS THAT IRRADIATION IS SAFE
01/31. FDA MUST REFOCUS PROPOSED RULES ON PRIOR NOTICE, NFPA SAYS
01/31. Six new cases of BSE
01/31. University of Illinois, State Scientists Tackle CWD and Othe
01/31. Mad cow epidemic warning
01/31. WHO warns of 'mad cow' risk outside the EU
01/31. SureBeam Processed Meat Now in 2,100 Stores
01/31. E. coli Summit ignores irradiation
01/31. Food terrorism a new worry

01/30. MHS CONSULTS ON PROPOSED CHANGES TO MEAT INSPECTION CHARGES
01/30. LDP OKS BILL TO FINE BEEF PRODUCERS OVER TRACKING
01/30. U.S. Lawmakers Ask Bush to Take Food Dispute to Internationa
01/30. New Fed Food, Drink Plan Proposed
01/30. FOOD SAFETY AND QUALITY UPDATE - NO.1
01/30. CSPI ON HARVARD ACRYLAMIDE STUDY -
01/30. FOOD IRRADIATION HEARINGS IN OTTAWA: DON'T NUKE OUR FOOD!!
01/30. PROPOSED BIOTERRORISM RULES TO PROTECT U.S. FOOD GMA STRESSE
01/30. FDA PLANS STRICT U.S. ANTI-TERROR FOOD IMPORT LAWS
01/30. USA: FDA proposes anti-bioterrorism food import rules
01/30. Health Ministry conducts food safety checks for CNY
01/30. FSIS to double cities monitored by meat import inspectors
01/30. Study Shows Acrylamide In Baked And Fried Foods Does Not Inc
01/30. GM FOOD - Authorisation of New GMO Food Products
01/30. World Health Body Warns That Mad Cow Still a Risk
01/30. Weis Markets to Begin Selling Irradiated Ground Beef
01/30. Safeway to Sell SureBeam(R) Processed Fresh Ground Beef in B
01/30. Food Safety Summit To be Held March 18-20, 2003 in Washingto
01/30. Third Party Will Review Food Safety at Omaha, Neb.-Based Neb
01/30. FSA launches its new salmonella campaign
01/30. Snow Brand vows to restore image with safety steps
01/30. Hopes Of Less Draconian Scallop Regime
01/30. Zambia's GM food fear traced to UK
01/30. PRIOR NOTICE OF IMPORTED FOOD SHIPMENTS PROPOSAL
01/30. FDA PROPOSES REGULATION FOR REGISTERING FOOD FACILITIES

JOB OPENING

This information from http://www.hastingsgr.com

Executive Chef N274
Cincinnati, OH
AA Culinary Arts, BS Science preferred 5 or more years experience in recipe formulation and flavor testing. Combination of foodservice and industrial experience is ideal. Individual will: Perform various culinary projects in support of flavor application. Develop concepts to highlight company's flavors. Participate in ideation sessions. Attend, assist and conduct customer presentations.
Salary $50,000 to $65,000

Food Technologist, Product Development N276
Cincinnati, OH
Individual must have a BS Food Science and 1-2 years experience in product development. Frozen Entree experience is preferred. Pilot plant or scale-up experience a big plus. Individual will be responsible for the smooth transition of previously developed recipes into production at a new manufacturing site. Will also troubleshoot production problems from the formulation standpoint. Knowledge of freeze/thaw cycle a big plus.
Salary to $45,000

Technical Manager N277
Cincinnati, OH
BS Food Science required, MS preferred. Individual should have a BS or MS in Food Science and 7-10 years experience with natural extracts and oleoresins. Ideal candidate will have both product development and sales experience. Candidate must have knowledge of the application and product development personnel among the major savory food manufacturers in the US. Individual will direct the technical sales activities for spices and herbal ingredients for a major flavor house. Will be responsible for oversight of the savory ingredients laboratory and liaison with plant operations. Must be willing to travel 50-75% of time and able to be of technical assistance to major clients.
Salary to $110,000

Food Technologist R270
Napoleon, OH
BS Food Science, Microbiology or related + 1 year. Entry level position. Will perform laboratory analysis on incoming ingredients and finished products. Includes Microbiological, physical and chemical testing, in-plant surveys and overseeing sanitation operations. Responsible for overseeing the activities of Laboratory Technicians and working with operations personnel providing technical advice/support regarding product safety and quality. Ability to troubleshoot, interpret results and make recommendations. Room for advancement. Background with soup, sauces, beverages, gravies ideal. Will pay relocation, typical benefit package. Mostly first shift, might have to help on other shifts if problem arises.
Salary to $46,000
Culinary Technologist R271
Lenexa, KS
BS Food Science + 5-10 years. Product Development with some culinary training to create and apply seasoning blends for meat, poultry, rubs, marinades, injection solutions and snacks. Will interface with the customer on customer driven projects and trade shows.
Salary to $80,000

Sr. Scientist Process Cheese R275
Memphis, TN
BS Food Science or related + 5-7 years Process Cheese. Senior Scientist position developing Cheese and New Processes for manufacture of process cheese. Candidate will have 5-7 years of Product Development and scale-up of Process Cheese. Will work with internal operations for scale-up as well as work with customers in their scale-up utilizing companies process cheese.
Salary to $65,000 + bonus


QA Food Technologist N273
Jonesboro, AR
BS Food Science or related + internship. Plant quality position doing microbiology and chemical testing of raw materials, finished products and plant sanitation samples. Plant produces frozen foods. Audit experience with HACCP,SSOP,TQC,MIR,QMS and SPC to make sure plant is conforming to standards. Interact with operations on non-compliant materials to resolve issues. Involved with packaging weight control and recipe procedures in operations. Involved with regualtory safety and quality issues including interface with USDA inspectors. Strong analytical, computer and interpersonal skills necessary.
Salary to $40,000

Sanitation Supervisor N 269
Provo, UT
BS + 4-5 years experience in food production setting is required. Must have previous experience with CIP systems. also should be knowledgeable in GMPs, SSOPs, and HACCP. Position is in large frozen food facility. Individual will be responsible for 40 hourlies on third shift sanitation. Reports to 3rd shift manager.
Salary to $55K + bonus.

*New Listing*
Food Technologist R270
Napoleon, Ohio
BS Food Science, Microbiology or related + 1 year experience. Entry level position. Will perform laboratory analysis on incoming ingredients and finished products. Includes Microbiological, physical and chemical testing, in-plant surveys and overseeing sanitation operations. Responsible for overseeing the activities of Laboratory Technicians and working with operations personnel providing technical advice/support regarding product safety and quality. Ability to troubleshoot, interpret results and make recommendations. Room for advancement. Background with soup, sauces, beverages, gravies ideal. Will pay relocation, typical benefit package. Mostly first shift, might have to help on other shifts if problem arises.

*New Listing*
Manager Maintenance & Engineering R268
Napoleon, Ohio
BS Engineering, MBA (preferred) + 10-15 years experience. Direct all Maintenance & Engineering and supervise the overall processes of Engineering, Maintenance and Power Departments. Oversee the Maintenance, repair and installation of capital improvements including manufacturing equipment, power house/utility equipment and other company equipment. Determines the needs and processes for authorizing requisitioning of parts, supplies and materials required for the successful continued operation of Plant equipment. Reports to the Plant Manager. (If no MBA, will need to pursue degree.) Oversee 165 hourly, 12 salaried Maintenance & 11 Engineering personnel.
Salary to $90,000 + Bonus

Process Development Engineer N267
Cincinnati, OH
PhD Chemical Engineering plus 3-7 years experience in laboratory and pilot scale process development of chemical or biochemical processes, including transfer to manufacturing. Knowledge of one or more of the following process is preferred: distillation, liquid/liquid extraction, liquid/solid extraction, spray drying, fluid bed drying, filtration, centrifugation, adsorption, instrumentation and process control, capital/operating cost estimation, mathematical modeling, CHEMCAD or equivalent process simulation software. MUST have background in flavors or food ingredients. Individual will be responsible for scaling up new processed flavors. Major responsibilities include working with flavorists in developing and scaling up new flavors, maintaining the pilot plant, and carrying new flavor production from bench through the pilot plant and into manufacturing.
Salary to $80,000

Food Technologist N266
Cincinnati, OH
Individual must have a BS degree in a scientific field plus 3 years experience in savory flavor applications or savory food product development. Individual will create savory products such as sauces, gravies, and snacks to test or showcase savory flavors. Will work closely with flavor chemists and marketing to determine best flavor/product combination. Individual will work closely with customers.
Salary to $45,000


Sr. Project Engineer - Process N264
Boston, MA
BS Chemical Engineering or other engineering discipline with 7-10 years experience in food plant process engineering, experience creating project teams and the ability to delegate and accomplish tasks through others. This is a corporate position with multi-plant responsibility. Individual will develop process/batching/CIP design and installation plans and processing and equipment and piping specifications; evaluate existing processing installations to upgrade/improve performance; develop major projects from conception to finished construction and installation; develop processing/receiving capital budget for various plants and provide consulting services to plant engineering department. Travel approximately 40%.
Salary $80,000 to $90,000


Scientist 1 - NMR Spectroscopist N259
Cincinnati, OH
Requirements: MS in Chemistry plus experience in operating and maintaining NMR systems, knowledge of FTIR and GC/MS instrumentation. Must be able to demonstrate capability of NMR, IR and MS spectra interpretation.
Responsibilities: Individual will be responsible for conducting authentication analysis on natural flavor ingredients using isotope NMR techniques, planning and executing NMR and FTIR experiments and developing, maintaining, and managing NMR and IR databases.
Salary to $55K


Scientist 1 - Volatile Analysis Chemist N 260
Cincinnati, OH
Requirements: MS in Chemistry or Food Science plus 2 years experience in operating and maintaining GC and GC/MS. Must have strong skills in GC/MS data processing and mass spectrum interpretation.
Responsibilities: Individual will assist in conducting flavor research. Specific responsibilities are planning and executing experiments, performing sample preparations, conducting data processing/interpretation, operating and maintaining analytical instrumentation, performing instrumental analysis: GC and GC/MS, troubleshoot and repair lab instruments, maintaining log notebooks for instrumentation, updating and maintaining instrument software.
Salary to $55K


Developmental Chef N258
Cincinnati, OH
Requirements: AA Culinary Arts required, BS Science preferred plus 3-5 years experience in recipe formulation and flavor testing. combination of foodservice and industrial experience is ideal.
Duties: Individual will: 1) perform various culinary projects in support of flavor applications, 2) develop concepts to highlight company's flavors, 3) participate in ideation sessions, and 4) attend, assist and conduct customer presentations.
Salary to $50K


Production Supervisor R187
Toledo, OH
BS Food Science or related + 3 years exp
Need supervisors for their manufacturing plant, for second or third shift. These candidates will be on a fast track to move up in the operations department of the Fortune 100 company. Successful candidate will have experience in a food manufacturing plant for 3 years. Some supervision will be helpful. Familiarization with thermal processing, canning, jar packing and high speed packaging a real plus. Need to hire now!! This is a union plant.
Salary to$50K