02/27/2012
ISSUE:484

Comprehensive News List
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Control of Microorganisms in Food Short Course
(2days Course)

(May. 3-4, Denver, Co.)
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US and China Sign 5 Year Ag Agreement on Food Safety, Security
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/02/us-and-china-sign-5-year-ag-agreement-on-food-safety-security/
By Helena Bottemiller (eb 17, 2012)
The United States and China signed a five year agreement on food security, sustainable agriculture, and food safety at an agricultural symposium in Iowa Thursday.
"We are the world's two largest agricultural producers and strong collaborators in agricultural research and education," said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack at the event. "Our great trade relationship benefits the citizens of both of our nations."
"This plan builds on the already strong relationship our nations enjoy around agricultural science, trade, and education," added Vilsack. "It looks to deepen our cooperation through technical exchange and to strengthen coordination in priority areas like animal and plant health and disease, food security, sustainable agriculture, genetic resources, agricultural markets and trade, and biotechnology and other emerging technologies."
The agreement was largely focused food security and agricultural sustainability issues -- China has 1.3 billion people to feed, and is increasingly relying on imports -- but food safety was also a key part of the document, which USDA says will "guide the two countries' agricultural relationship for the next 5 years."
Vilsack told the audience Thursday the China and the United States "have opportunities to collaborate and partner on food safety" through implementing best practices and advancing science-based laws and regulations.

Arsenic fears sparks call for ORBS limits in organic foods
Source : http://www.foodqualitynews.com/Public-Concerns/Arsenic-fears-sparks-call-for-ORBS-limits-in-organic-foods
By Oliver Nieburg (Feb 17, 2012)
There is an urgent need to set regulatory limits for organic brown rice syrup (ORBS) found in organic food products over links to inorganic arsenic exposure, according to a study.
OBRS is used as a sweetener in organic foods and gluten-free products such as infant formula, cereal bars and energy shots. It is used as an alternative to high fructose corn syrup.
The study, ‘Arsenic, Organic Foods, and Brown Rice Syrup’, published online yesterday in the Environmental Health Perspectives Journal, found that high quantities of arsenic could be found in many of these products.
Cancer risk
The researchers called the finding “particularly troubling given the non-threshold relationships between cancer risk and exposure to arsenic”.
There are currently no regulations applicable to inorganic arsenic in food in the US and EU. Only China has set a regulatory limit in food at 150 ng inorganic arsenic per gram of rice.
The research by Brian Jackson et al assessed arsenic content in commercially available products containing ORBS, including infant formula, cereal bars and energy shots.
They found high concentrations of arsenic and dimethylarsentae in many of these products that could put consumers at risk.
Limits needed
“Our findings suggest that the OBRS products we evaluated may introduce significant concentrations of Asi [arsenic]I to an individual’s diet. Thus, we conclude that there is an urgent need for regulatory limits on Asi in food,” said the study.
The researchers said that consumers of organic products would be particularly interested in the finding as they had made conscious healthy eating choices by going organic.
Products tested were ordered online or in stores and included three brown rice syrups, 17 infant formulas, 29 cereal bars and three high energy performance products.
The authors’ survey of 100 cereal bars, found that around a third contained ORBS. Although arsenic in ORBS infant formulas did not, on average, exceed Chinese limits, the researchers said there was “cause for concern”. For the study in full, see HERE.

Expert urges farmers to take lead on food safety
Source : http://www.canadianbusiness.com/article/72309--colorado-governor-s-ag-forum-addresses-food-safety
By AP (February 23, 2012)
A food safety expert told Colorado farmers Thursday that last year's deadly listeria outbreak traced to Colorado cantaloupe proved that they cannot rely on third-party inspections to guarantee their produce is safe.
Larry Goodridge, associate professor at the Center for Meat Safety and Quality in the Department of Animal Sciences at Colorado State University, told farmers that they bear primary responsibility for food safety.
"Each farm or processing facility has to be able to assess their own risks," Goodridge told the governor's annual forum on Colorado agriculture in Denver. "Everybody who produces food has to be responsible for the safety of the food they produce. You cannot rely on third parties. You just can't."
The listeria outbreak traced to Jensen Farms in eastern Colorado last year was blamed for the deaths of 32 people. It infected 146 people in 28 states with one of four strains of the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Jensen Farms was given a "superior" inspection rating by a third-party auditor just before the outbreak.
Listeria generally is found in processed meats and unpasteurized milk and cheese, though there have been a growing number of outbreaks in produce.
The Food and Drug Administration does not regulate third-party auditors, and a congressional report released in January quoted the auditing company that graded Jensen farms as saying audits are not intended to improve food safety standards.
Retailers often rely on such audits in an effort to make sure food is safe, the report said.
A food safety law passed last year would boost federal inspections of growers — but the money to fund it isn't guaranteed from Congress. Meanwhile, President Barack Obama's proposed budget would eliminate the Agriculture Department's Microbiological Data Program, the nation's only program that regularly tests fruits and vegetables for deadly pathogens.
Goodridge said that growers who hire auditors often are looking for a thorough assessment of how they are running their operations — but that the auditors might instead perform generic walk-throughs.
He urged farmers to focus on sanitary practices such as keeping equipment and storage areas clean. He also urged them to educate the public on ways to safely handle produce in the same manner as consumers are advised how to safely handle meat.
The FDA said last year that melons at Jensen Farms likely were contaminated in the operation's packing house, which was using secondhand, hard-to-clean equipment. Melons in the field tested negative.
The new food safety law requires the FDA to improve third-party audits of food facilities abroad that export to the United States, but it does not address domestic audits.

Back to basics to tackle coming shortage of food safety auditors
Source : http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Quality-Safety/Back-to-basics-to-tackle-coming-shortage-of-food-safety-auditors
By Caroline Scott-Thomas(Feb 23, 2012)
There could be an impending shortage of food safety auditors in the United States, rooted in a lack of food safety emphasis in the US education system, says director of food safety solutions at DNV Business Assurance Kathleen Wybourn.
Speaking to FoodNavigator-USA at last week’s Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) conference in Orlando, Florida, Wybourn said that while audits of food facilities are expected to be ramped up as the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) is implemented, there is likely to be a lack of qualified auditors to do the job.
“There’s a gap. Most of the auditors that work for me are 60 or 70. It’s going to be a problem…It’s the same in the government, but the certification bodies also have a shortage of auditors,” she said.
Wybourn said she thinks one part of the answer could be to teach food safety in schools, in order to inspire young people to become involved in assuring the quality and safety of the food supply.
“There’s so much the government and consumers don’t know about what goes on in the food supply. And I think a lot of the problem comes from schooling in the United States…That’s where the future professionals come from,” she said. “You need a depth of knowledge for food safety auditing…you can’t just take someone from communications or marketing.”
FDA lack of clarity
Although FSMA was signed into law over a year ago, progress is necessarily slow, as there is a lack of understanding within government – even at the FDA, she added. “There’s a lack of clarity even within the FDA, as far as third party audits are concerned,” she said, although she said was positive all parties involved in implementing FSMA were coming to the table with the best intentions.
“Everybody is trying to do the right thing, but there are so many stakeholders,” she said. “…It’s reinforcing what the big companies have been doing. It’s the smaller ones that never had this requirement before. I’m very impressed with the supply chain reaching out to be educated.”
Third-party auditing came under fire last month in the wake of the Jensen Farms cantaloupe contamination. Meanwhile, the FDA has said it is developing a new accredited third-party certification program, which it hopes will improve the quality and reliability of such audits.
Accredited third party certification
Also speaking at the GFSI conference, FDA deputy commissioner for foods Michael Taylor told delegates: “The next big opportunity for engagement on these issues will come in the spring, when we hope to publish and invite comment on the proposed rule establishing the framework for FDA’s accredited third party certification program.”
However, he too acknowledged that there may be challenges attracting enough auditors – and he emphasized that third-party audits would not replace direct regulatory oversight.
“Many of the challenges involve institution and capacity building,” he said. “They go beyond anything FDA can address in a regulation.”

Got (raw) milk? Think twice before serving it
Source : http://www.examiner.com/health-news-in-phoenix/got-raw-milk-think-twice-before-serving-it
By Ruth Ann Monti
I used to get (unsolicited) advice about what to feed my son. He's always been healthy enough so I took it with a grain of salt. I guess people assume a single mom with a round-faced boy must be stuffing him with Twinkies or whatever.
The only advice I thought was truly unusual came only a couple of times from people who advised me to stop "hurting" him (in one person's words) with pasteurized milk and give him raw milk. Which I've never done.
See, I believe in science. I believe that the earth is several billions of years old, that vaccines prevent serious illnesses that used to kill or disable children, and that a lot of our food is safer today then it was back when Upton Sinclair was investigating slaugherhouses for his book The Jungle.
So I went on buying milk, albeit only hormone-free milk.
I was not surprised to read today that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that the majority of 121 dairy-related disease outbreaks from 1993 to 2006 was caused by raw (unpasterurized) milk. In fact, the 13-year study found that raw milk was 150 times more likely to cause outbreaks than pasteurized milk.
Continue reading on Examiner.com Got (raw) milk? Think twice before serving it - Phoenix Health News | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/health-news-in-phoenix/got-raw-milk-think-twice-before-serving-it#ixzz1nXPKIK7K
I used to get (unsolicited) advice about what to feed my son. He's always been healthy enough so I took it with a grain of salt. I guess people assume a single mom with a round-faced boy must be stuffing him with Twinkies or whatever.
The only advice I thought was truly unusual came only a couple of times from people who advised me to stop "hurting" him (in one person's words) with pasteurized milk and give him raw milk. Which I've never done.
See, I believe in science. I believe that the earth is several billions of years old, that vaccines prevent serious illnesses that used to kill or disable children, and that a lot of our food is safer today then it was back when Upton Sinclair was investigating slaugherhouses for his book The Jungle.
So I went on buying milk, albeit only hormone-free milk.
I was not surprised to read today that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that the majority of 121 dairy-related disease outbreaks from 1993 to 2006 was caused by raw (unpasterurized) milk. In fact, the 13-year study found that raw milk was 150 times more likely to cause outbreaks than pasteurized milk.
Here are a few stats that happened during this time:
· 4,143 people were sick enough with some kind of dairy-related illness to come to CDC's attention.
· 60% were determined to have been sickened by raw milk.
· 60% of sickened raw milk consumers were under age 20.
· 239 of all dairy-sickened people were hospitalized. 200 of thm had consumed raw milk.
· 3 died, of whom 2 had consumed raw milk. The third had consumed a pasteurized product that had later been contaminated.
Raw milk can be contaminated with e. coli, listeria, salmonella, and other bacteria that are destroyed during pasteurization. But the bacterai can still be spread after pasteurization by food handlers who are themselves infected.
It's apparent that state laws (listen up Ron Paul fans!) do play a role in preventing these illnesses. While outbreaks were seen in 30 states, 75% were in the 21 states that allow the sale of raw milk. And states that permit raw milk or dairy product sales were more than twice as likely to experience outbreaks.
Arizona is one of 10 states that allows sale of nonpasteurized dairy products, including milk from cows and goats, by farmers and in retail stores. There are some regulations to protect consumers.
· Products must carry a prominent label advising that the product is unpasteurized.
· Farmers who sell raw milk and cream must obtain a producer-distributor license and a producer-manufacturer license if they sell other raw dairy products.
· Sellers must use state-approved bottling equipment.
· There are rules against co-mingling raw dairy products.
· Cows and goats must be tested periodically for tuberculosis and brucellosis.
It would be interesting to know if Arizona's outbreaks have come from products brought at retail stores or from farms.
Do you drink raw milk? What is the appeal--does it taste better, preserve more nutrients than pasteurized milk? Let me know. While I believe in science, I also am one of those people who look at food labels, don't buy stuff with ingredients I can't pronounce or with high fructose corn syrup.  And in case you were wondering, the round-faced boy looks at these labels, too.
Click here for the CDC press release and study links

134 arrested in China in continued 'gutter oil' crackdown
Source : http://www.foodqualitynews.com/Public-Concerns/134-arrested-in-China-in-continued-gutter-oil-crackdown
By admin(Feb 22, 2012)
A total of 134 people in the Chinese province of Shandong were arrested in 2011 for producing and selling ‘gutter oil’, according to China state media agency Xinhua.
To-date 19 people have been prosecuted, including two people convicted and sentenced to 10 years in prison for producing and selling more than 110 tonnes of the illegally produced oil.
Twelve government officials were also removed from jobs for dereliction of duty, according to Shandong court official Zhou Yuhua.
‘Gutter oil’ is used cooking oil dredged from drains and gutters near to restaurants which is later treated and resold to businesses and consumers.
FoodProductionDaily.com recently reported that nearly 290 people who violated Chinese food safety laws in 2011 were handed sentences including life imprisonment and the death penalty.

Six steps to create your own organic permaculture garden
Source : http://www.naturalnews.com/035038_permaculture_gardening_how_to.html
By Tara Green (Feb 22, 2012)
Organic gardening avoids the use of chemicals to make plants grow or protect them from insects, relying instead on natural gardening principles used for thousands of years. Permaculture organic gardening goes a step further and also emphasizes growing plants sustainably, working with rather than against the grain of the natural environment. Permaculture organic gardening is growing in popularity as more people realize that it offers an inexpensive and relatively low-maintenance way to grow their own fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers
Choosing a location
Observe your property at different times of day. Consider which areas receive the most sun, which are in shade for much of the day. Depending on where you live, if sunshine is a scarce commodity, you will want to expose plants to receive as much as possible. On the other hand, in desert regions, you will not want your plants to be in the area most likely to be parched by sun exposure. Also think protecting your garden from the paths where strong winds tend to blow through your property. Even a small property will have microclimates -- notice these and plant accordingly to give different plants either more sun or more shade according to their preference.
Selecting plants
Avoid disease-prone plants which require time-consuming chores such as spraying and pruning by the gardener. Select plants which will thrive in your area rather than those which will require extra labor on your part to protect them from the environment. As far as possible, select plants which serve multiple purposes, such as fruit trees which will put forth blossoms in one season, fruit to pick in another, and provide shade for when you want to sit and enjoy your garden's natural beauty. Native plants are also more likely to attract local pollinators such as bees, and to draw butterflies so that your garden contains even more natural beauty.
Making a home for your plants
Raised beds require less physical effort on the part of the gardener and also benefit plants, providing better air circulation, more protection from spring chills and improved usage of water. Raised beds also mean a small permaculture garden is an option even for apartment dwellers and others with little available space since you can rely on containers and vertical gardening principles.
Feeding your plants
One of the key concepts of permaculture organic gardening is to avoid waste. Having a garden gives you a means of re-using natural waste such as eggshells, apple cores, coffee grinds as well as yard waste which many people throw away. You can either purchase or make a compost bin to turn this organic material into gardening gold which can be used to help your plants grow.
Watering your plants
Modern gardeners who do not follow sustainability principles tend to draw heavily on piped-in water resources, often using hoses and sprinklers to make plants which require abundant water grow in a desert climate. Permaculture organic gardening tries to use natural water as much as possible, maximizing the use of groundwater and rainwater. Rain barrels allow you to collect rainfall and extend its use over longer periods of time.
Protecting plants from pests
Eschewing the use of chemicals does not have to mean a garden full of pests. You can use companion gardening principles, growing plants which deter pests near those which attract them. There is also a natural synergy between some plants which means planting them near each other increases your yield. Also, just as some herbs have a medicinal effect on human health, they also offer benefits to plants which grow near them. For more information about companion planting, visit
http://www.appropedia.org/CCAT_companion_planting and http://www.gardeningknowhow.com
If you have space and live in an area where it is permissible to keep poultry, chickens can make a wonderful addition to a permaculture garden. If they are permitted free-range for most of the day, they will consume many pests. Chicken manure also contributes beneficial nitrogen to the soil of your garden.

Pasteurizing Almonds With Infrared Heat
Source : http://www.foodproductdesign.com/news/2012/02/pasteurizing-almonds-with-infrared-heat.aspx
By admin (Feb 21, 2012)
New research from the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Western Regional Research Center has discovered a new almond pasteurizing technique called “sequential infrared and hot air" (SIRHA) provides fast, reliable and relatively economical pasteurization.
According to the researchers, giving almonds a burst of infrared heat, followed by a stint of hot-air roasting, offers a simple, safe, energy-efficient and environmentally friendly way to reduce Salmonella enterica populations to levels generally recognized as safe. Taste tests revealed infrared heating didn’t alter the mild taste, smooth texture, attractive appearance or other characteristics of the almonds.
It’s generally thought that almonds are not naturally contaminated with high levels of Salmonella enterica; however, all almonds processed for sale in the United States today have to be pasteurized in order to kill Salmonella. The pasteurization procedure has to be powerful enough to reduce Salmonella population levels by a 4-log minimum. That’s a 10,000-fold decrease.
For the studies with shelled, roasted almonds, for example, the team targeted a “medium roast," during which almonds’ naturally light shade deepens somewhat. The scientists compared the effectiveness of three approaches: conventional hot-air heating, infrared heating or SIRHA. They found SIRHA was more energy efficient than either infrared or hot-air heating alone.
“With the combined infrared and hot-air heating, we can produce a pasteurized product and significantly reduce roasting time. That should help processors save on their energy bills," the researchers said.
For this work and their newest study with raw almonds, the team used the bacterium Enterococcus faecium as a research model and substitute, or surrogate, for S. enterica. The roasting studies showed, for instance, a more than 5.8-log reduction in E. faecium levels—exceeding the required 4-log minimum. That target was met handily by heating the almonds with infrared until they reached a surface temperature of 140°C, then roasting them with hot air at the same temperature for about 11 minutes. The infrared step took about 1 minute, using emitters—positioned above and below the almonds—that produced 5,000 watts of energy per square meter.
Some packinghouses already use infrared heating, but not for pasteurizing. Instead, it’s part of a wet/dry process to remove almonds’ paper-thin skin, or pellicle, for certain almond products.

Wisconsin Warns Of Castle Rock Unpasteurized Milk
Source : http://www.perishablenews.com/index.php?article=0020470
By Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (Feb 20, 2012)
Castle Rock Organic Dairy Plant, Osseo, WI, is warning residents not to drink whole milk dated Feb. 29, carrying the brand name Castle Rock Organic Farms, because it may not be properly pasteurized.
The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection conducted laboratory testing on the product and confirmed that pasteurization of the product may have been inadequate. Food Safety Officials are unaware of any illnesses caused by the product.
The milk in was sold in half-gallon and quart glass bottles. It has a sell-by date of Feb. 29 and dairy plant number of 55-1951 on the bottle. It is believed to have been distributed in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Illinois.
Consumers who have this product in their homes should discard it.
Laboratory tests resulting from a routine inspection showed the presence of an active enzyme that is normally destroyed by pasteurization. Testing for this enzyme activity is a routinely done to check for proper pasteurization, a heating process that destroys disease-causing bacteria, including Salmonella, E. coli 0157:H7, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes. These food-borne illnesses may cause symptoms ranging from nausea and diarrhea to kidney failure, paralysis and death. Listeria infections may cause pregnant women to miscarry.
The products were produced at Castle Rock Organic Farms in a licensed on-farm bottling plant.

U.S. meat supply widely contaminated with mad cow disease prions
Source : http://www.naturalnews.com/035025_mad_cow_disease_prions_meat.html
By David Gutierrez (Feb 21, 2012)
Mad cow disease is a progressive brain-wasting disease. It is caused by a type of defective protein known as a prion and cannot be cured. The factory farming practices of feeding animals the nervous tissue of other animals first caused the ballooning spread of mad cow disease and created the current crisis. When it became clear what had happened, many countries banned feeding the tissue of ruminants (cows, sheep and goats) to other ruminants.
There's just one problem: ruminant tissue (including nervous tissue) is still fed to everything else. That means that chicken, farmed fish, and any other kind of meat might contain mad cow prions.
To make matters worse, fish meal, chicken feces and the bodies of other animals can then be fed straight back to ruminants intended for human consumption. An extra step has been added, but the concentration of prions in animal flesh continues.
Prions are NOT destroyed by cooking
U.S. consumers are widely taught to "cook the meat" in order to sterilize it. But prions are not bacteria. They aren't alive, and they remain completely unaffected by cooking. Even radiation cannot destroy prions. They can survive right through the meat packing process and wind up in your next hamburger.
Ultimately, the only way to reliably reduce your risk of mad cow disease is to avoid factory-farmed meat products altogether. Only organic beef from grass-fed cattle can be trusted. Any meat that comes from a typical feedlot operation may be infected with prions and could therefore be deadly to consume.

EU: Food safety authority urges sprout safety notification
Source : http://www.freshplaza.com/news_detail.asp?id=93045
By admin (Feb 20, 2012)
The European Food Safety Authority has said that consumers should be notified of the risks involved with eating sprouted seeds.
This comes as a result of the E.coli outbreak in Germany recently.
EFSA’s Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ) said that sprouted seeds posed specific microbial safety concerns.
Preventing initial contamination during production, storage and distribution of seeds was of foremost importance, BIOHAZ said, urging growers, suppliers and retailers to take additional food safety and mitigation measures.
It also called on suppliers to flag the risk on pack. “Stakeholders and consumers should be informed of the risk posed by sprouted seeds,” EFSA said.

FDA to review safety of inhalable caffeine
Source : http://yourlife.usatoday.com/health/story/2012-02-20/FDA-to-review-safety-of-inhalable-caffeine/53170392/1
By admin(Feb 21, 2012)
Food and Drug Administration officials plan to investigate whether inhalable caffeine sold in lipstick-sized canisters is safe for consumers and if its manufacturer was right to brand it as a dietary supplement.
AeroShot went on the market late last month in Massachusetts and New York, and it's also available in France. Consumers put one end of the canister in their mouths and breathe in, releasing a fine powder that dissolves almost instantly.
Each grey-and-yellow plastic canister contains B vitamins, plus 100 milligrams of caffeine powder, about the equivalent of the caffeine in a large cup of coffee.
AeroShot inventor, Harvard biomedical engineering professor David Edwards, says the product is safe and doesn't contain taurine and other common additives used to enhance the caffeine effect in energy drinks.
AeroShot didn't require FDA review before hitting the U.S. market because it's sold as a dietary supplement. But New York's U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer said he met with FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg and she agreed to review the safety and legality of AeroShot.
"I am worried about how a product like this impacts kids and teens, who are particularly vulnerable to overusing a product that allows one to take hit after hit after hit, in rapid succession," Schumer said.
He planned to announce the AeroShot review Sunday.
Tom Hadfield, chief executive of Breathable Foods, which makes AeroShot in France, said in a statement that the company will cooperate fully with the FDA's review to address the issues raised by Schumer and are confident it will conclude that AeroShot is a safe, effective product that complies with FDA regulations.
The company said that when used according to its label, AeroShot provides a safe amount of caffeine and B vitamins and does not contain common additives used to enhance the effect of caffeine in energy drinks.
It said each AeroShot contains B vitamins and 100 milligrams of caffeine, about the equivalent of caffeine in a large cup of coffee, and that AeroShot is not recommended for those under 18 and is not marketed to children.
Meanwhile, an FDA official who was at the meeting confirmed the decision, telling The Associated Press that the review will include a study of the law to determine whether AeroShot qualifies as a dietary supplement. The product will also be tested to figure out whether it's safe for consumption, the official said.
The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because that official was not authorized to discuss the matter.
Schumer pressed the FDA in December to review AeroShot, saying he fears that it will be used as a club drug so that young people can keep going until they drop. He cited incidents that occurred last year when students looking for a quick and cheap buzz began consuming caffeine-packed alcoholic drinks they dubbed "blackout in a can" because of their potency.
Pressure from the senator and others helped persuade the FDA to stop the marketing, distribution and sale of these beverages, including Four Loko.
"We need to make sure that AeroShot does not become the next Four Loko by facilitating dangerous levels of drinking among teenagers and college students," Schumer said in a statement.
Breathable Foods says the product is different from the potent beverages. The company says that it's not targeting anyone under 18 and that AeroShot safely delivers caffeine into the mouth, just like coffee does.
A single unit costs $2.99 at convenience stores, mom-and-pops, and liquor and online stores. The product packaging warns people not to consume more than three AeroShots a day.
"When used in accordance with its label, AeroShot provides a safe shot of caffeine and B vitamins for ingestion," the manufacturer says on its website. "Caffeine has been proven to offer a variety of potential benefits for health to individuals when consumed in moderation, from providing energy to enhancing attention and focus."
AeroShot, the flagship product of Cambridge, Mass.-based Breathable Foods, is the product of a conversation that Edwards had with celebrity French chef Thierry Marks over lunch in the summer of 2007.
The first venture Edwards worked on with Harvard students was the breathable chocolate, called Le Whif. Now he's preparing to promote a product called Le Whaf, which involves putting food and drinks in futuristic-looking glass bowls and turning them into low calorie clouds of flavor.

APNewsBreak: FDA to probe safety of inhalable caffeine, which is sold as a dietary supplement
Source : http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/apnewsbreak-fda-to-probe-safety-of-inhalable-caffeine-which-is-sold-as-a-dietary-supplement/2012/02/19/gIQABq35MR_story.html
By Associated Press (Feb 19, 2012)
U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials plan to investigate whether inhalable caffeine sold in lipstick-sized canisters is safe for consumers and if its manufacturer was right to brand it as a dietary supplement.
AeroShot went on the market late last month in Massachusetts and New York, and it’s also available in France. Consumers put one end of the canister in their mouths and breathe in, releasing a fine powder that dissolves almost instantly.
Each grey-and-yellow plastic canister contains B vitamins, plus 100 milligrams of caffeine powder, about the equivalent of the caffeine in a large cup of coffee.
AeroShot inventor, Harvard biomedical engineering professor David Edwards, says the product is safe and doesn’t contain taurine and other common additives used to enhance the caffeine effect in energy drinks.
AeroShot didn’t require FDA review before hitting the U.S. market because it’s sold as a dietary supplement. But New York’s U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer said he met with FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg and she agreed to review the safety and legality of AeroShot.
“I am worried about how a product like this impacts kids and teens, who are particularly vulnerable to overusing a product that allows one to take hit after hit after hit, in rapid succession,” Schumer said.
He planned to announce the AeroShot review Sunday.
Tom Hadfield, chief executive of Breathable Foods, which makes AeroShot in France, said in a statement that the company will cooperate fully with the FDA’s review to address the issues raised by Schumer and are confident it will conclude that AeroShot is a safe, effective product that complies with FDA regulations.
The company said that when used according to its label, AeroShot provides a safe amount of caffeine and B vitamins and does not contain common additives used to enhance the effect of caffeine in energy drinks.
It said each AeroShot contains B vitamins and 100 milligrams of caffeine, about the equivalent of caffeine in a large cup of coffee, and that AeroShot is not recommended for those under 18 and is not marketed to children.
Meanwhile, an FDA official who was at the meeting confirmed the decision, telling The Associated Press that the review will include a study of the law to determine whether AeroShot qualifies as a dietary supplement. The product will also be tested to figure out whether it’s safe for consumption, the official said.
The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because that official was not authorized to discuss the matter.
Schumer pressed the FDA in December to review AeroShot, saying he fears that it will be used as a club drug so that young people can keep going until they drop. He cited incidents that occurred last year when students looking for a quick and cheap buzz began consuming caffeine-packed alcoholic drinks they dubbed “blackout in a can” because of their potency.
Pressure from the senator and others helped persuade the FDA to stop the marketing, distribution and sale of these beverages, including Four Loko.
“We need to make sure that AeroShot does not become the next Four Loko by facilitating dangerous levels of drinking among teenagers and college students,” Schumer said in a statement.
Breathable Foods says the product is different from the potent beverages. The company says that it’s not targeting anyone under 18 and that AeroShot safely delivers caffeine into the mouth, just like coffee does.
A single unit costs $2.99 at convenience stores, mom-and-pops, and liquor and online stores. The product packaging warns people not to consume more than three AeroShots a day.
“When used in accordance with its label, AeroShot provides a safe shot of caffeine and B vitamins for ingestion,” the manufacturer says on its website. “Caffeine has been proven to offer a variety of potential benefits for health to individuals when consumed in moderation, from providing energy to enhancing attention and focus.”
AeroShot, the flagship product of Cambridge, Mass.-based Breathable Foods, is the product of a conversation that Edwards had with celebrity French chef Thierry Marks over lunch in the summer of 2007.
The first venture Edwards worked on with Harvard students was the breathable chocolate, called Le Whif. Now he’s preparing to promote a product called Le Whaf, which involves putting food and drinks in futuristic-looking glass bowls and turning them into low calorie clouds of flavor.

Exposure to Nanoparticles in Foods May Harm Health
Source : http://www.foodproductdesign.com/news/2012/02/exposure-to-nanoparticles-in-food-vitamins-may-ha.aspx
By admin(Feb 17, 2012)
New research published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology has found exposure to engineered nanoparticles found in foods and pharmaceuticals may be more harmful to health than previously thought.
Researchers at Cornell University investigated how large doses of polystyrene nanoparticles—a common, FDA-approved material found in substances from food additives to vitamins—affected how well chickens absorbed iron, an essential nutrient, into their cells.
Researchers tested both acute and chronic nanoparticle exposure using human gut cells in petri dishes as well as live chickens and reported matching results. They chose chickens because these animals absorb iron into their bodies similarly to humans, and they are also similarly sensitive to micronutrient deficiencies. The researchers used commercially available, 50-nanometer polystyrene carboxylated particles that are generally considered safe for human consumption. They found that following acute exposure, a few minutes to a few hours after consumption, both the absorption of iron in the in vitro cells and the chickens decreased. However, following exposure of 2 milligrams per kilogram for two weeks—a slower, more chronic intake—the structure of the intestinal villi began to change and increase in surface area. This was an effective physiological remodeling that led to increased iron absorption.
The researchers noted that in some sense this intestinal villi remodeling was positive because it shows the body adapts to challenges. But it serves to underscore how such particles, which have been widely studied and considered safe, cause barely detectable changes that could lead to, for example, over-absorption of other, harmful compounds.
"Nanoparticles are entering our environment in many different ways," the researchers said. "We have some assurance that at a gross level they are not harmful, but there may be more subtle effects that we need to worry about."

Rice-sweetened baby formula may contain arsenic: U.S study
Source : http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/16/us-arsenic-rice-study-idUSTRE81F11Q20120216
By Lauren Keiper (Feb 16, 2012)
A sampling of products sweetened with organic brown rice syrup, including cereal bars and baby formulas, found levels of arsenic that exceeded U.S. standards for bottled water, U.S. researchers said on Thursday.
The study by researchers at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire followed a Consumer Reports analysis of arsenic levels in some fruit juices last year. The previous study showed some juice samples exceeded federal limits on arsenic in place for drinking water, prompting concern from consumer groups and U.S. lawmakers.
Organic brown rice syrup is used as a sweetener in some food products as an alternative to high fructose corn syrup, researchers said, and rice can be a major source of inorganic arsenic.
For the latest study, the team tested 17 baby formulas, 29 cereal bars and three energy shots that were purchased in the Hanover, New Hampshire area.
Of the two formulas that listed organic brown rice syrup as the main ingredient, one had a total arsenic concentration that was six times the federal limit for bottled water, which is 10 parts per billion, the team reported in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.
"I don't think there's much risk associated with eating a cereal bar every couple of days," Brian Jackson, the lead researcher, told Reuters. "But it is a source of arsenic that we may not be considering."
For babies and toddlers, Jackson said it would be best to avoid formulas that use organic brown rice syrup as a sweetener until arsenic levels in such products are regulated.
Arsenic is toxic at high doses, and chronic exposures can damage the liver, skin, kidney and cardiovascular system. Babies are especially vulnerable because of their size, the team said.
A Web-based search found that only the two formulas studied contained organic brown rice syrup, so the number of infants exposed is "presumably a very low percentage of U.S. formula-fed infants," the team wrote. The researchers did not identify the brands of the products that were tested.
The researchers studied 29 cereal bars and high energy bars and found 22 listed rice-based ingredients -- including organic brown rice syrup, rice flour, rice grain or rice flakes - among the top five ingredients.
Tests of these bars showed they had higher arsenic concentrations than comparable food products without the rice-based sweetener.
The team said arsenic and arsenic metabolites can become absorbed in rice through natural microbes and traces of pesticides in the soil.
Since there are no U.S. regulations governing arsenic in food, the team said the findings showed there was an "urgent need" for regulation.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it recognized there were trace amounts of arsenic in many foods. The agency has expanded its surveillance of rice, including a study initiated last year to determine the level and type of arsenic found in rice and rice products. That study is expected to be completed in the coming months.
A statement from the Organic Trade Association said it agreed with calls to regulate limits on arsenic across the food supply. It said any rice product destined for baby food should come from regions known to have arsenic-free soils.

Lawsuit: Woman removed sprouts but still got sick
Source : http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46503780/ns/health/
By AP (Feb 23, 2012)
A 23-year-old woman has become the second Iowan to sue Jimmy John's sandwich chain over an outbreak of foodborne illness linked to sprouts.
Mollie Horton of Altoona filed the lawsuit Thursday in Polk County District Court. She said she fell ill Dec. 26, days after eating a sandwich from a Jimmy John's party platter at a family gathering.
Horton's lawsuit said she removed the sprouts from the sandwich but nonetheless caught E. coli poisoning that caused her to be hospitalized for three days and sick for weeks. Testing showed her illness was the result of the strain linked to the outbreak, which sickened 12 people in five states.
A Jimmy John's spokeswoman declined comment. But Horton's attorney, Bill Marler, says the Illinois-based chain has finally pulled sprouts from its menu.

New Jersey Identifies 2 Illnesses Related to Consumption of Raw Milk DHSS Reminds Residents of Health Risks of Drinking Raw Milk
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/new-jersey-identifies-2-illnesses-related-to-consumption-of-raw-milk-dhss-reminds-residents-of-healt/
By Bill Marler (Feb 23, 2012)
New Jersey currently has two residents that are ill in connection to a major outbreak caused by the consumption of raw milk from a Pennsylvania farm. Currently 78 people in several states have become ill with campylobacteriosis, a gastrointestinal illness, from the consumption of raw milk contaminated with bacteria. Raw milk is milk from cows, goats, sheep, or other animals that has not been pasteurized.
“Raw milk can contain a number of bacteria that can cause life-threatening illness, especially in those with compromised immune systems,” said Health and Senior Services Commissioner Mary E. O’Dowd. “Since consumers cannot tell if milk is contaminated by smelling or tasting it, residents should avoid consuming raw milk because of health risks associated with it.”
The bottled raw milk products were distributed throughout Pennsylvania, including Montgomery, Bucks, Philadelphia, and Delaware counties, which all border the Delaware River. The raw milk from this farm was purchased in Pennsylvania. The sale or distribution of raw milk is banned in New Jersey.
While the majority of illness has occurred in Pennsylvania, residents in New Jersey, Maryland and West Virginia have also been affected. A 27-year-old male from Burlington County and a 3-year-old male from Gloucester County both got ill after consuming raw milk from the Family Cow Dairy in Pennsylvania.
“Most people who become ill with campylobacteriosis get diarrhea, cramping, abdominal pain, and fever within two to five days after exposure to the organism, said Health and Senior Services Deputy Commissioner Dr. Arturo Brito. “The diarrhea may be bloody and can be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Residents that have consumed raw milk and have symptoms should contact their physician.”
The illness typically lasts one week. Some infected people do not have any symptoms. In those with compromised immune systems, Campylobacter occasionally spreads to the bloodstream and causes a life-threatening infection. Long-term complications include contracting Guillain Barre Syndrome, which may result in paralysis that lasts several weeks and usually requires intensive care.
The source of this outbreak, Family Cow Dairy, has since been permitted by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture to resume bottling. It is important to note that this outbreak occurred despite the fact that Family Cow Dairy is licensed, inspected, and operating in compliance with Pennsylvania laws.
According to the CDC, 93 outbreaks due to consumption of raw milk or raw milk products were reported from 1998 through 2009 resulting in 1,837 illnesses, 195 hospitalizations and two deaths. CDC released a study this week that stated the rate of outbreaks caused by unpasteurized milk and products made from it was 150 times greater than outbreaks linked to pasteurized milk.
In addition to Campylobacteriosis, raw milk has been implicated in outbreaks of E. coli O157:H7, salmonellosis, listeriosis, brucellosis, tuberculosis, and many other diseases.
Illnesses caused by these bacteria can be especially problematic for infants, young children, the elderly, and the immune compromised.
Anyone with knowledge of persons engaging in the sale or distribution of raw milk in New Jersey is encouraged to contact the Food and Drug Safety Program at (609) 826-4935.

Canadian E.coli O157:H7 beef contamination origin unknown - CFIA
Source : http://www.foodqualitynews.com/Food-Alerts/Canadian-E.coli-O157-H7-beef-contamination-origin-unknown-CFIA
By Mark Astley (Feb 23, 2012)
The Canadian Food Inspection Authority (CFIA) has not implemented any measures in relation to the potentially-lethal pathogen contamination, which resulted in the recall of Country Morning Beef Burgers and un-branded packs of Club Pack Beef Steakettes.
The Quebec-based authority told FoodQualityNews.com that it would not be taking any actions until test results pinpoint the source of the contamination.
The recalled products, which were manufactured by New Food Classics, were distributed to stores across Canada.
There has been one reported illness in relation to consumption of this product.
Investigation continues
“The investigation continues,” said CFIA food safety recall specialist Fred Jamieson. “We are trying to determine the route cause – whether the contamination originated from the raw input or during carryover.”
“What we are doing at the moment is conducting a trace-back.”
“The on-going investigation will establish where the contamination started and from there we can reassess if any more products may need to be recalled.”
Jamieson added that the agency had not received any other information to suggest the source and no measures have been implemented by the company or the CFIA.
“They were frozen products and were produced last October. Whatever measures were in place at that time are still in place now.”
“Once the results have come back, and the issue has been established then we will look at changing practices,” Jamieson added.
Expanded recall
The original recall applied to several batches of 1kg packaged Country Morning Beef Burgers products were distributed to COOP and TGP grocery stores in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Northwest Territories.
The Country Morning Beef Burger recall has since been expanded to include stores in Ontario, Yukon Territories and Nunavut.
One batch of 2.3kg packs of the un-branded Club Pack Beef Steakettes, which were distributed to several stores across the country, has also been affected by the recall.
“The manufacturer, New Food Classics, 1122 International Blvd, Suite 601, Burlington, Ontario is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall,” said the recall statement.
“Food contaminated with E.coli O157:H7 may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause serious and potentially life-threatening illnesses.”

Months later, deaths from cantaloupe outbreak continue to climb
Source : http://vitals.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/02/22/10479908-months-later-deaths-from-cantaloupe-outbreak-continue-to-climb
By JoNel Aleccia (Feb 23, 2012)
Five months after the first report of listeria infections tied to contaminated cantaloupe, victims of the outbreak continue to die. But just how many isn't clear.
A lawyer representing those sickened says four more people have died after lingering illnesses linked to eating the tainted fruit last summer. But officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say the agency has been notified of just two more deaths tied to the outbreak. Those deaths occurred "well before" the agency's Dec. 8 "final" report, but were logged only after, said Lola Russell, a spokeswoman for the CDC.
At that time, CDC reported 30 deaths and one miscarriage related to the outbreak, part of 146 illnesses in 28 states.
The discrepancy may lie in how outbreak-related deaths are reported by state-level officials, Russell wrote in an e-mail.
"It can be unclear whether a death is directly related to infection with listeria when a patient dies many weeks or months after first becoming ill with listeria infection, especially if the patient was elderly or had serious medical conditions that also can lead to death," Lola Russell wrote. "The count of outbreak-related deaths is not final and may still change."
Bill Marler, a Seattle food safety lawyer, said that three of his clients have died in the weeks since the CDC report. They include Paul Schwarz, 92, of Kansas City, Mo.; Sharon Jones, 62, of Castle Rock, Colo.; and Mike Hauser, 68, of Monument, Colo. Dale L. Braddock, 79, of Omaha, Neb., also reportedly died after contracting a listeria infection.
Russell, of the CDC, could not provide the states where the two deaths beyond the 30 the agency has previously counted occurred.
Marler and other food safety lawyers are suing producers and distributors of the tainted fruit, including Jensen Farms of Holly, Colo., where federal inspectors found evidence that poor sanitation, poor storage practices and dirty equipment caused the deadly outbreak. Illnesses were first reported on Sept. 2; recall of the entire crop of cantaloupes soon followed.

Norovirus, Oysters and Reporting Foodborne Illness
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/02/a-tale-of-norovirus-oysters-and-reporting-foodborne-illness/
By Mary Rothschild (Feb 23, 2012)
On Nov. 4, 2011 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced a recall of ASSI branch frozen oysters from South Korea, which has been linked to an outbreak of norovirus in the Pacific Northwest.
Now the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reveals the story behind that recall in the February 17 edition of its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). It's a cautionary tale about a batch of contaminated oysters that could have made many more people sick had public health officials not been able to crack the case quickly.
On Oct. 19, 2011, the CDC relates, a woman in Washington state contacted Public Health - Seattle & King County and said she began suffering from acute gastroenteritis after dining at a local restaurant.
Staff members interviewed the woman and her companions and learned that three of the seven in the dinner party had eaten a raw oyster dish, and from 18 to 36 hours later experienced aches, nausea and diarrhea. One of the three also reported vomiting.
The four diners who did not eat the raw oysters did not become ill.
A stool specimen from one of the ill diners, collected 17 days after onset of symptoms, tested positive for norovirus.
Health department investigators collected eight 3-lb. bags of frozen raw oysters in the restaurant's walk-in freezer and sent them off to the Food and Drug Administration's Gulf Coast Seafood Laboratory for testing. They were positive for norovirus.
The frozen oysters, which had been distributed in seven states, had a two-year shelf life and could have made many other people ill -- freezing does not kill norovirus -- had they not been removed from circulation.
"Such contamination has potential for exposing persons widely dispersed in space and time, making cases difficult to identify or link through traditional complaint-based surveillance," the CDC authors wrote in the MMWR.
The CDC noted that it has recently launched a national electronic norovirus outbreak surveillance network, called CaliciNet, and recommends the collection of stool specimens to confirm a diagnosis, characterize the norovirus strain and upload the sequence results into CaliciNet.
"Additionally, all suspected and confirmed norovirus outbreaks should be reported to CDC by state and local health departments through the National Outbreak Reporting System," the authors advise.
Noroviruses are the most common cause of epidemic gastroenteritis, responsible for at least half  of all gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide, and a major cause of foodborne illness. In the United States, norovirus is estimated to cause about 21 million illnesses each year.

Colorado man treated for listeria infection dies
Source : http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46474806
By AP (Feb 21, 2012)
A law firm representing a Coloradan who was treated for listeriosis after eating cantaloupe says the man has died.
The Marler Clark firm says Mike Hauser of Monument died Tuesday.
It's unclear if Hauser's death will be included in the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's list of at least 30 deaths nationwide linked to an outbreak of listeria in cantaloupe from Jensen Farms in southeast Colorado.
The family referred questions Tuesday to their lawyers. The law firm says it believes Hauser died of a different infection that sent him back to the hospital after he had recently returned home from treatment for listeriosis.
The CDC has said the outbreak of listeria in cantaloupe this fall was the deadliest outbreak of foodborne illness in 25 years.

Jimmy John's Permanently Dropping Sprouts From Menus
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/02/jimmy-johns-gourmet-sandwich-franchise/
By Dan Flynn (Feb 20, 2012)
Jimmy John's Gourmet Sandwich franchise owners and customers are being told the chain is permanently dropping sprouts from the menu.
Jimmy John's restaurants are currently associated with a five-state outbreak of the rare O26 strain of E. coli.   It is the fifth outbreak involving sprouts traced back to Jimmy John's franchises since 2008.
While there has been no public comment by Jimmy John's since the outbreak was announced February 15,  a Kirkville, MO franchise owner says "Jimmy himself" has ordered all sprouts permanently removed from the menu.
"Jimmy decided he was tired of the negative press from it and he thinks sprouts aren't necessary for Jimmy John's to rock," franchise owner Will Aubuchon told the Daily Express in Kirksville, MO.
And Linda DeGraaf, a Jimmy John's customer from Omaha who was sickened in the 2009 outbreak, was told by a corporate email that sprouts have been dropped.  "We no longer serve sprouts because supplies are too inconsistent," wrote a Jimmy John's spokeswoman. 
After a 2010 outbreak, founder Jimmy John Liautaud switched the sandwich chain to clover sprouts after Salmonella illnesses were associated with alfalfa sprouts. At the time, he said clover sprout seeds were smoother and would be easier to clean.
Jimmy John's is not alone among sandwich chains that have decided sprouts are too risky.   The 230-unit Jason's Deli dropped sprouts for at least the balance of 2012 as a food safety concern.  And the current O26 outbreak prompted the seven-state Erbert and Gerbert's Sandwich Shops to drop sprouts.
Jimmy John's recent history includes five major outbreaks associated with spouts. Only the latest involves E coli O26.
Briefly here's the history of each of those incidents, including the latest ongoing event:
2011 - E. coli O26
On February 15, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced an ongoing investigation into illnesses linked to consumption of raw clover sprouts at Jimmy John's restaurants.
Twelve are sickened in five states.  Among the 11 ill persons with information available, 10 (91 percent) reported eating at a Jimmy John's sandwich restaurant in the 7 days preceding illness. Ill persons reported eating at 9 different locations of Jimmy John's restaurants in 4 states in the week before becoming ill.
One Jimmy John's restaurant location was identified where more than one ill person reported eating in the week before becoming ill. Among the 10 ill persons who reported eating at a Jimmy John's restaurant location, 8 (80 percent) reported eating a sandwich containing sprouts, and 9 (90 percent) reported eating a sandwich containing lettuce.
Currently, no other common grocery stores or restaurants are associated with illnesses. Preliminary traceback information has identified a common lot of clover seeds used to grow clover sprouts served at Jimmy John's restaurant locations where ill persons ate.
FDA and states conducted a traceback that identified two separate sprouting facilities; both used the same lot of seed to grow clover sprouts served at these Jimmy John's restaurant locations. On Feb. 10, 2012, the seed supplier notified sprouting facilities that received this lot of clover seed to stop using it. Investigations are ongoing to identify other locations that may have sold clover sprouts grown from this seed lot.
2010 (December) - Salmonella Newport
Sprouters Northwest of Kent, WA, issued a product recall after the company's clover sprouts had been implicated in an outbreak in Oregon and Washington. At least some of the cases had consumed clover sprouts while at a Jimmy John's restaurants.  Seven were sickened.
At about the same time, a separate Salmonella outbreak was linked to Tiny Greens Organic Farm, and Jimmy John's, involving alfalfa sprouts served at Jimmy John's restaurants.
2010 (Dec) - Salmonella I4,[5],12:i:-
A second outbreak involving Jimmy John's was reported Dec. 17, 2010 by the Illinois Department of Health.   Many of the Illinois cases reported eating alfalfa sprouts at various Jimmy John's franchises in an outbreak that sickened 140.
Four days later, on December 21, Jimmy John Liautaud asked all of his franchises to remove sprouts from the menu as a "precautionary" measure.
On December 23, the Centers for Disease Control revealed that outbreak cases had been detected in other states and that the outbreak was linked with eating alfalfa sprouts while at a "nationwide sandwich chain."
On December 26, preliminary results of the investigation indicated a link to eating Tiny Greens' Alfalfa Sprouts at Jimmy John's restaurant outlets. The FDA subsequently advised consumers and restaurants to avoid Tiny Greens Brand Alfalfa Sprouts and Spicy Sprouts produced by Tiny Greens Organic Farm of Urbana, Illinois. Spicy sprouts contained alfalfa, radish and clover sprouts.
On Jan. 14, 2011, it was revealed that the FDA had isolated Salmonella serotype I4, [5], 12:i: - from a water runoff sample collected from Tiny Greens Organic Farm; the Salmonella isolated was indistinguishable from the outbreak strain. The several FDA inspections of the sprout growing facility revealed factors that likely led to contamination of the sprouts.
2009 - Salmonella Saintpaul
Jimmy John's, which the CDC at the time identified at "Restaurant Chain A" was caught up in one of the largest recent sprout-related outbreaks.
A total of 256 were sickened in an outbreak first reported in February by the, Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.  Officials there identified six isolates of Salmonella Saintpaul. Although this is a common strain of Salmonella, in the previous year only three cases had been detected in Nebraska and only four subtypes of this outbreak strain had been identified in the entire USA.
Alfalfa sprout consumption was found in a case study to be significantly related to illness. The initial tracebacks of the sprouts indicated that although various companies had distributed the sprouts, the sprouts from the first cases originated from the same sprouting facility in Omaha.
Forty-two of the illnesses beginning on March 15 were attributed to sprout growing facilities in other states; these facilities had obtained seed from the same seed producer, Caudill Seed Company of Kentucky. The implicated seeds had been sold in many states.
On April 26, the FDA and CDC recommended that consumers not eat raw alfalfa sprouts, including sprout blends containing alfalfa sprouts. In May, FDA alerted sprout growers and retailers that a seed supplier, Caudill Seed Company of Kentucky, was withdrawing all alfalfa seeds with a specific three-digit prefix. 
CDC also reported many illnesses occurred at "Restaurant Chain A," which was later identified as Jimmy John's.
2008 - E coli O157:NM
An outbreak of E. coli O157:NM in Colorado's Boulder and Adams counties, including the University of Colorado, was linked to the consumption of alfalfa sprouts from Jimmy John's franchises in the area.
The sickened, including several UC students, experienced symptoms of bloody diarrhea and cramping with O157 determined to be the cause.  A total of 28 illnesses were associated with the outbreak.
In addition, the environmental investigation identified Jimmy John's food handlers in Boulder, CO who worked while infected with E. coli. The health department investigation found a number of critical food handling violations, including inadequate hand washing. The 14 isolates from confirmed cases were a genetic match to one another.

Missouri E. coli Outbreak Litigation Past and Present: sprouts sicken 3 Greene County women
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/missouri-e-coli-outbreak-litigation-past-and-present-sprouts-sicken-3-greene-county-women/
By Drew Falkenstein (Feb 18, 2012)
The 5 state, 12 victim E. coli outbreak linked to sprouts on Jimmy Johns sandwiches has sickened 3 women in Greene County, Missouri.  No surprise that this outbreak is linked to both sprouts and Jimmy Johns, as the two have mingled with bad consequences at least 3 times before.  The women were aged 25 through 49.  In addition to the Missouri E. coli victims, 9 others from Iowa, Arkansas, and Wisconsin were sickened in the Jimmy Johns sprouts E. coli outbreak.
The sprouts appear to have come from an Inman Kansas farm called Sweetwater Farms.  The owner, John Hershberger, states that federal investigators have not conclusively linked the seeds to the outbreak.
Missouri has been hit hard by the E. coli bug in years past, resulting in lots of lawsuits.  The most recent is the Schnuck's romaine lettuce E. coli O157:H7 outbreak, which sickened at least 60 people, mostly from Missouri.  Marler Clark has filed multiple lawsuits on behalf of several seriously injured victims, and identified the distributor of the contaminated lettuce as Vaughan Foods, from Oklahoma.
Herb Depot and Autumn Olive Farm Unpasteurized (Raw) Goat Milk 2008: A child developed hemolytic uremic syndrome after consuming raw goat's milk that had been purchased at a local store, the Herb Depot. Another child was identified to have E.coli O157:H7; this child's family reported consuming milk that had been purchased from the same store. The investigation found that the milk had been produced by Autumn Olive Farm. The strain of E.coli found in this outbreak was unique and shared by three laboratory confirmed cases.
Totino's frozen pizza E. coli O157:H7 outbreak (2007): At least 21 people were sickened by E. coli O157:H7 after eating Totino's or Jeno's brand pizzas produced by General Mills in Fall 2007. Outbreak victims were from Kentucky, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin. General Mills initiated a broad recall of the contaminated products after they were linked to E. coli illnesses in the outbreak.
Kids Korner Daycare E. coli Outbreak 2004: Marler Clark represented the family of a two-year-old boy and his eight-month-old sister who both attended Kids’ Korner and became ill with E. coli infections. The two-year-old boy developed HUS and was hospitalized for nearly three weeks. He endured a full week of dialysis, seven transfusions, three surgeries, and a severe case of pancreatitis. Many other children were also sickened in the outbreak, and several of them developed HUS.

No Comment From Jimmy John's About E coli O26 Outbreak
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/02/no-comment-from-jimmy-johns-about-outbreak/
By Dan Flynn (Feb 19, 2012)
Jimmy John's Gourmet Sandwich franchises like to be known for "freaky fast delivery," promising customers quick response.
But the promise does not apply to the news media after foodborne illness outbreaks involving Jimmy John's. 
Since the February 15 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about a five state outbreak of the rare O26 strain of E. coli associated with clover sprouts served by its sandwich restaurants, Jimmy John's has opted not to respond at all to media inquiries. 
Jimmy John Liautaud, founder of Jimmy John's, has not responded to an invitation to respond to questions from Food Safety News.  The invitation was sent to his private email address, which was provided by one of Jimmy John's former advertising and public relations agencies.
After previous outbreaks involving Jimmy John's, the franchise restaurant chain also dodged the media. In January 2011, however, Liautaud did respond to multiple outbreaks involving alfalfa sprouts served by Jimmy John's restaurants with an announcement the chain was switching to clover sprouts.
But since this new warning by CDC about the E. coli O26 outbreak involving clover sprouts from Jimmy John's, the chain has gone back to the silent strategy. One of its competitors, Erbert and Gerbert's Sandwich Shops, has for the time dropped sprouts from the menu.
"The decision to pull the sprouts from our  system-wide menu is being made to protect the health of our guests," said E&G's Chief Executive Officer Eric Wolfe. "We value the well-being of our customers and felt removing all sprouts from our menu and sandwich line was the best way to eliminate the risk.
Until they were pulled, alfalfa sprouts were served at E&G's restaurants in Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado, George and Texas.
CDC's initial case count for the latest Jimmy John's-connected outbreak totaled 12.  Two have been hospitalized. 
The sickened were in Iowa (5), Missouri (3), Kansas (2), Arkansas (1), and Wisconsin (1).
All the victims, so far, have been female, ranging in age from 9 to 49 with a median age of 25.  None have died.
CDC identified a common lot of clover seeds used to grow the clover sprouts served on Jimmy John's sandwiches.








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