Editor: D.H. Kang
Dept. FSHN
Washington State Univ.

Issue 5

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Useful Column

HACCP: Do You Need It?
by Sue Grossbauer, RD (from DMA Food protection Co.)
Hazard analysis. Flow charts. Definitions of critical control points. Logs. Thermometers. Paperwork. Who needs it? Indeed, implementing and maintaining a HACCP system is an intensive process. For a busy manager, the question looms?Why do it? If you have already earned your CFPP credential, you've certainly done your homework. You know that HACCP is a preventive, proactive approach to food safety. You know that it offers food safety benefits far superior to those of a simple sanitation plan. But you may still wonder whether to expend the resources to make it happen. Even if you're convinced, your boss may be asking you to justify your efforts. Here are some points to consider: HACCP is sound risk management. This is a language that your boss and your boss's boss are likely to appreciate. In every industry, risk management means controlling risks that?if NOT controlled ?could lead to devastating results. With food safety, lack of control can mean a foodborne illness outbreak. The upshot for your organization? Large expenditures in legal fees, insurance costs, food loss, downtime or closures, damaged reputation, lost business, and most critically, illness or death of those you care for. HACCP is recommended by the FDA. Although not a legal requirement yet in most locations, HACCP is a system that is widely adopted, highly respected, and broadly recommended by food safety experts worldwide. So much so that the FDA makes this statement in the 1999 Food Code: "FDA is recommending the implementation of HACCP in food establishments because it is a system of preventive controls that is the most effective and efficient way to ensure that food products are safe. A HACCP system will emphasize the industry's role in continuous problem solving and prevention rather than relying solely on periodic facility inspections by regulatory agencies."HACCP is cost effective. According to the USDA, implementation of HACCP systems can save nearly a billion dollars per year. The number-crunching says that every dollar spent on HACCP implementation saves $1.92.
HACCP works. Already regulated in the meat processing industry, HACCP has generated results, according to information released by the US Food Safety and Inspection Service in July, 2000. Preliminary data from the FSIS HACCP-based inspection models project indicate that the new system dramatically improves the safety of poultry products and increases overall consumer protection as well. Let's Be Practical OK, sounds like a good idea. But good ideas don't deliver the time and resources to carry off such a complex endeavor. What's the solution?
In a draft called HACCP Principles Guide for Retail Establishments, the FDA makes HACCP implementation a lot easier than you might expect. Let's say you have a long list of menu items. Do you really have to study them one by one to create a HACCP plan? Not necessarily, says the FDA. Try grouping your items. The FDA offers three processing models that apply to many foodservice operations and menus:
Process 1: Foods that you receive, prepare, and serve without cooking. An example: tuna salad.
Process 2: Foods that you receive, prepare, cook, hold, and serve. Examples: hamburger, soup.
Process 3: Foods that you receive, prepare, cook, cool, reheat, hold, and serve. Examples: gravies, sauces, large roasts.
For each type of process, the FDA Guide offers a list of common hazards, and walks you through the seven steps of HACCP, with sample critical control points and critical limits. Yes, your homework is almost done for you! The Guide also lists key questions to ask in order to hone in on appropriate controls.
This same document identifies common hazards associated with specific foods in a section called Special Considerations Reference. Get a head start on understanding what exactly you may be trying to control when you serve eggs (Salmonella), or large snapper fish (Ciguatera toxin). By focusing your plan on the known risks associated with each food, you can streamline your efforts ? and develop a plan that actually works.

A Plan for a Plan
So, if you are wondering how to start in your spare time, here's a two-month plan for jump-starting your HACCP plan:
Week 1: Go online and read the FDA Guide.
Week 2: Group your menu items into three process groups, following the FDA Guide.
Week 3: Review the questions associated with the Process 1 group, and check the sample CCPs and critical limits. Adopt or modify them for your menu items.
Week 4: Review the questions associated with the Process 2 group, and check the sample CCPs and critical limits. Adopt or modify them for your menu items.
Week 5: Review the questions associated with the Process 3 group, and check the sample CCPs and critical limits. Adopt or modify them for your menu items.
Week 6: Round up your current logging and reporting forms. Decide whether you have what you need, or revise your forms as required.
Week 7: Train your staff!
Week 8: Begin monitoring your HACCP systems. Take time to plan how you will conduct ongoing monitoring and verification.
Help on the Web
FDA Draft: HACCP Principles Guide for Retail Establishments:
http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/hret-1.html
FDA HACCP Backgrounder:
http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/bghaccp.html
FDA 1999 Food Code, Annex 5 - HACCP Guidelines:
http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/fc99-a5.html
Preliminary FoodNet report on foodborne illness for 1999: http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4910a1.htm
Test Your Foodborne Illness Know-How!
Some key numbers can help you get the right perspective. Once you pass this quiz, hand it on to your boss! Answer True or False to each of the following questions.

___T ___F 1. Foodborne illness is a rare situation, with fewer than 5,000 cases per year in the entire nation.
___T ___F 2. The most common cause of foodservice-related outbreaks is the holding temperature of food.
___T ___F 3. Foodborne illness caused by Salmonella bacteria declined in 1999.
___T ___F 4. California has an unusually low incidence of foodborne illness caused by Campylobacter bacteria.
___T ___F 5. The FDA recommends use of a HACCP plan in foodservice operations.
___T ___F 6. Industry-wide implementation of HACCP can save nearly $1 billion per year, according to government sources.

Answers: 1. False. The numbers are 76 million cases per year, and 5,000 deaths. 2. True. Next most common causes are poor hygiene and improper cooking. 3. False. The most recent CDC data shows a slight increase from 1998 to 1999. 4. False. In 1999, California's rate of Campylobacteriosis was about four times greater than the rest of the nation's. Georgia's rate of Salmonellosis was about double that of the rest of the nation. 5. True. 6. True.


Major Food Safety News

Salmonella Poisoning Patient Dies
Fri Jul 12, 6:53 PM ET

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) - A customer who was treated for food poisoning after dining at a Red Lobster restaurant last month has died. The diner, who name was not released, was among dozens of patrons who contracted salmonella poisoning, a food-borne illness caused by bacteria. Authorities were working to determine whether the illness, which is not often fatal, was the cause of death.More than 160 people have reported becoming sick, suffering from vomiting, fever and diarrhea, after dining at the Red Lobster restaurant in the Hixson neighborhood of Chattanooga on June 21 or 22. Of those, 35 cases have so far been confirmed to be salmonella. Tests were pending in other cases."I know that the person is one of 35 confirmed cases and that the person died," Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department spokeswoman Judy Frank said Friday.Frank said a hospital reported the death. She declined to release other information about the victim, including when the person died, or what hospital reported it.The fatality rate for salmonella poisoning is less than 1 percent, she said."This is rare," she said. "This is not the expected outcome."Salmonella can cause serious infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems.Red Lobster quality assurance manager Debbie Chapman said the Orlando, Fla.-based company was saddened by the report of the death."We have been in contact with the family and are working closely with them to investigate this matter to determine if there is a connection to our restaurant," she said.Chapman also declined to release any information about the person who died.Authorities have not said what food was believed to have been contaminated.Gary Cook, 53, of Cleveland, spent a week in the hospital with salmonella poisoning after eating at the Red Lobster on June 21. He said he was still weak but greatly improved.Frank said health officials were continuing to receive telephone calls from people who ate at the restaurant on the two days but did not know about the salmonella reports.

E. coli outbreak hits home
Health officials say ConAgra's recalled beef may be source
By Maria Sanchez-Traynor, Camera Staff Writer
July 12, 2002
Three E. coli cases in Boulder County are connected to a statewide outbreak that has infected at least 12 Coloradans in nine counties. Health officials said they are investigating whether ConAgra Beef Co. might be the source of the outbreak. In all, 23 people in the state have come down with the illness since June 1. A 4-year-old from Longmont was among those stricken and was hospitalized for at least a week but has since been released, according to county health officials. Heath Harmon, a communicable disease specialist for the Boulder County Health Department, said four E. coli cases have been detected in the area since June 24. Three are from the same E. coli 0157:H7 strain that has infected other Coloradans, and the fourth is still being investigated. Three of the people stricken are from Longmont, and one is from Louisville. They range in age from 2 to 18. The same strain of the bacteria has been found in meat packaged at ConAgra's Greeley plant June 30, prompting the company to recall 345,000 pounds of ground beef."There has not been any connection made between our product and the illnesses," said Jim Herlihy, spokesman for ConAgra beef company. Dr. Ned Calonge, the state's chief medical officer, said the health department should determine the source within the next few days.
Calonge said ConAgra does everything possible to ensure the safety of its products. After the recall, he said the company called in two experts in microbiology and epidemiology to the Greeley plant to validate its processing procedures.The vast majority of ConAgra's recalled beef was distributed to Safeway stores in Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota. Eleven of the 12 linked cases have all reported buying the meat at Safeway. Calonge said the summer months traditionally have more cases of the illness and that the state health department was checking five to six reports of possible E. Coli infections Thursday. Harmon, with the Boulder County Health Department, said while the area has the most cases, it doesn't mean residents are at more of a risk. "This is a product that goes to all Safeway stores throughout the state of Colorado," he said. "There's no way you could associate a greater risk to Boulder County compared to other counties." He said the elderly and young children, especially those 5 and younger, are especially vulnerable to the illness. Harmon said the best way to prevent E. coli is to simply cook food properly. If ground beef is cooked at 155 degrees Fahrenheit, the bacteria will be killed. Contact reporter Maria Sanchez-Traynor at (303) 473-1328 or sanchezm@dailycamera.com.

New probiotics from Danisco

Danish food ingredients company Danisco is to launch the first of two new probiotic bacteria cultures developed by Australasian companies Fonterra Research Centre (NZDRI) and NZMP Ltd.
New coffee flavours from Danisco
Danisco explores Russian market, with positive results
Danisco announces Q1 results
Danisco continues divestment programme
Danisco moves into Australasia
Danisco looking to expand ingredients segment
The launch is the result of a co-operation managed by the Danisco Specialities division, dedicated to development of dairy cultures and other speciality products.
In 2001, Danisco obtained the licences for production and marketing of the two probiotic bacteria cultures in major parts of the world. ¡°The probiotic cultures play an important role in improving our resistance to infection. The term probiotic means "for life" and is derived from the Greek/Latin word "pro" and the Greek word "bios." A yoghurt containing one of these cultures will, in more than one way, be a natural contribution to a healthy breakfast,¡±said Danny O'Regan from Danisco.In a bid to provide an ¡®easy-to-remember¡¯ name for the consumer, the first product, to be marketed primarily in Europe and the United States, has been branded HOWARU Bifido, a play on the English expression ¡®How are you?¡¯. ¡°We¢¥ve already introduced HOWARU Bifido to a number of large European dairy companies, and the product has been met with noticeable acclaim,¡± said O'Regan. The HOWARU range will be supported by a website which will go live in early August. Danisco is hoping that the HOWARU cultures will generate sales in the double-digit million krone range as early as next year.

Foodborne OUTBREAKS COLLECTIONS
07/15. Salmonella Poisoning Patient Dies
07/15. E. COLI SICKENS A DOZEN COLORADANS, PEOPLE IN AT LEAST TWO O
07/12. Lawsuits against bakery delayed until November
07/12. E. coli outbreak hits home
07/08. GASTROENTERITIS, FOODBORNE - BAHRAIN
07/08. 98 HONG KONG DINERS SICKENED BY SEAFOOD ON HOLIDAY OUTING
07/02. PREVENT FOODBORNE ILLNESS THIS FOURTH OF JULY BY FOLLOWING K
07/02. NEARLY 350 FILIPINO STUDENTS SUFFER FOOD POISONING
07/02. Family fears deer caused dad's illness
07/01. 48 dead in cholera outbreak in Mozambique
06/30 Pastry sickens hundreds at Spanish festival
06/30 FESTIVAL CAKE POISONS 1200 Jun 29 2002
06/29. Deadly O-157 bacteria runs rampant at nursery school
06/29. Bad Milk Blamed for Wis. Outbreak
06/28. Was it the stew? 20 sick at juvenile center
06/28. OUTBREAK OF MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT SALMONELLA NEWPORT
06/28. OUTBREAK OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI INFECTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH
06/27. SPAIN-FOOD POISONING
06/27. Salmonella infection victims hire top lawyer
06/27. Leadership camp ended by illness
06/27. OVER 150 FOOD POISONINGS REGISTERED IN THREE RUSSIAN REGIONS
06/26. 650 PEOPLE IN NORTHERN SPAIN AFFECTED BY FOOD POISONING
06/26. OUTBREAK OF E. COLI SENDS ALBERTA CHILDREN TO HOSPITAL
06/26. Reported Salmonella poisoning cases now at 55
06/25. 36 new cases of Salmonella poisoning

ForFull Information, click on
07/15. Bacteria down at county beaches
07/15. Salmonella Poisoning Patient Dies
07/15. ACRYLAMIDE SCARE CAUSES CHIPS TO FLY
07/15. BREATHLESS KISS: PEOPLE WITH FOOD ALLERGIES WARNED
07/15. E. COLI SICKENS A DOZEN COLORADANS, PEOPLE IN AT LEAST TWO O
07/15. Parents hand out bad food awards
07/14. Dutch government reports growth hormone that caused food sca
07/13. GROUND BEEF SOLD IN COLORADO FOCUS OF AN E. COLI O157:H7 OUT ?
07/12. Lawsuits against bakery delayed until November
07/12. E. coli outbreak hits home
07/12. Dutch government reports growth hormone that caused food sca
07/12. New probiotics from Danisco
07/12. European Food Authority - Advisory rather than independent -
07/12. Food Safety Focus International Conference


USDA/FDA NEWS
For full information, click on
http://www.FoodHACCP.com/regulation.html
-OPPDE What's New Page: Updated July 9, 2002
-U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated July 10, 2002
-Food Safety Officials Honored At Annual Awards Ceremony
-FDA Approves New Non-Nutritive Sugar Substitute Neotame
-Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Neotame
-Food Security in the United States
-Positive E. coli Test Results: Updated July 3, 2002
-FDA Food Labeling and Allergen Declaration; Public Workshop - August 14-15 in Dallas, Texas
-Food Labeling; Notification Procedures for Statements on Dietary Supplement
s

Recommended Sites
Internet Journal of Food Safety
Click Here

New Product Info.
BioSys Introduces the BioSys 128 and BioSys 32 Instruments
Manufacturers of food, beverage, meat, dairy, seafood, beverage, deserts, cosmetics and toiletries have an increased need of rapid and automated methods in microbiology. With the goal to reduce waste from poorly controlled processes, rapid feedback information, and help in monitoring the HACCP system.
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CHARM LUM-96 Sets
New Standards
Charm LUM-96 is a new
generation microplate luminescence system that
sets new standards in sterility and shelf-life testing on foods.
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Food Safety Poll

What is the most important foodborne pathogens?

 

 

FPI
Workshop list
(Contact Jennifer Epstein
Food Processors Institute (FPI)
1350 I Street, N.W. Suite 300
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: (202) 637-4818
Email: jepstein@nfpa-food.org

July 24 -25. In-Depth Verification(IDV). Omaha, NE
August 22. In-Depth Verification (IDV). Washington, DC

August 21-23. HACCP for Juice Processors. Ontario, CA
September 11-13. HACCP for Juice Processors. Miami, FL

August 20-21. Advanced HACCP. Washington, DC
November 7-8. Advanced HACCP. UC-Davis, CA

September 10-12. Basic HACCP in Spanish Miami, FL

November 4-6. Basic HACCP. UC-Davis, CA
December 3-5. Basic HACCP. New York

October 25. Pre-Requisite programs. Omaha, NE

October 21-25. Thermal Processing Development. Dublin, CA.


 

Useful Food Safety Video
to view the video, click on http://www.foodhaccp.com/online.html

HACCP Video (from UNL) (NEW ADDED)
Introduction to the Principles of HACCP (English, 15:14)
Beginning: Introduction to HACCP (4:10)
Goal of HACCP and the Seven Principles (0:54)
Principles 1 & 2: Conducting a Hazard Analysis and Identifying Critical Control Points (0:47)
Principle 3: Establishing Critical Limits (0:19)
Principle 4: Establishing Monitoring Procedures (0:36)
Principle 5: Establishing Corrective Action (0:26)
Principle 6: Establishing Record Keeping (0:29)
Principle 7: Verification (0:53)
HACCP Example Plan (5:04)
Summary of HACCP (2:20)

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