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4/7, 2003
ISSUE:61

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Current Food Safety News

04/07. FDA - INFORMATION FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
04/07. IRELAND: FSAI EMBRACES TRANSPARENCY
04/07. ELSA MURANO TO KEYNOTE FIRST WORLD CONGRESS ON FOOD IRRADIAT
04/07. THE EMERGING MANAGED FOOD CHAIN
04/07. FOOD GROWERS, DISTRIBUTORS TAKE EXTRA PRECAUTIONS TO ENSURE
04/07. AN EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR DISEASES IN NEW YORK

04/06. NEW STUDY REVEALS ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT IN FOOD HYGIENE KNOWL
04/06. Policing food temperatures
04/06. Italy reports 92nd case of mad cow disease, health official
04/06. State seeks new role for botulism remedy
04/06. Make Sure Your Water Is Well

04/05. 10 years ago, crypto gripped the city
04/05. Harmony Farms growing again - Salmonella outbreak prompted v
04/05. Careful -- that salad could be a petri dish
04/05. Pakistan: National conference on 'Safe Food-2003'
04/05. Food safety not a game, warns consumer organisation
04/05. Ruling Favors Suspended Meat Inspectors

04/04. AAFC: FOOD SAFETY AWARENESS PROGRAM GIVEN FEDERAL SUPPORT
04/04. GROUPE BROCHU TO IMPLEMENT ITS"CERTIFIED FOOD PROGRAM"
04/04. PROPOSED BIOTERRORISM REGULATIONS "MUST NOT UNNECESSARILY BU
04/04. Potential danger in plastic food packaging
04/04. Control of listeria video offered
04/04. FSAI embraces transparency
04/04. A&P rolls out irradiated ground beef in nearly 300 supermark
04/04. Prion principle proved Captured protein couple may help
04/04. Marshfield water system tainted with uranium
04/04. White powder in Tuna not cyanide
04/04. SUPERMARKET FIRM FINED FOR SELLING MEAT THAT WAS NOT FRESH A
04/04. Canned Sealord tuna has been pulled off supermarket shelves
04/04. Legislators want food lab moved
04/04. A one-agency solution to protect food supply

04/03. CANNED TUNA: A NEAR PERFECT FOOD: STRONG RESPONSE TO ADVOCAC
04/03. MULBERRY, FLA., FOOD IRRADIATOR ANNOUNCES $260,000 LOSS
04/03. A&P OPERATED SUPERMARKETS OFFER SUREBEAM(R) PROCESSED FRESH
04/03. TWO CLOSURES OF FOOD BUSINESSES IN MARCH
04/03. FOOD SAFETY AUTHORITY ANNOUNCES NEW PUBLIC CONSULTATION
04/03. EU figures released on GM food unpopularity
04/03. Genetically modified food
04/03. FDA urges global food suppliers to register
04/03. SCHOOL LUNCH, FOOD SAFETY BILLS INTRODUCED IN U.S. HOUSE OF
04/03. Fears grow over 'mad elk disease'
04/03. BSE results expected next week
04/03. Schnucks Recalls Sliced Smoked Salmon
04/03. Terror Weapons In The Cupboard?
04/03. Rapid detection and response is focus of food security prepa
04/03. An unexpected dinner guest -- When food inspector arrives
04/03. AMI OFFICIALS SAY INDUSTRY COLLABORATION PRODUCING SIGNIFICA
04/03. Food safety documents to read
04/03. F-B-I's weekly warning focuses on food safety
04/03. Food safety not political brinkmanship, warns consumer group

04/02. NCID©öS LATEST WEB SITE: HEALTHY PETS, HEALTHY PEOPLE
04/02. WHO GLOBAL SALMONELLA SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES: 2002
04/02. DR. ELSA A. MURANO TO ADDRESS IAFP 2003
04/02. INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR FOOD PROTECTION ELECTS YIANNAS
04/02. FAO TOUTS NEW FOOD SAFETY APPROACH
04/02. SAFE, INC. SUPPORTS CALIFORNIA CITY COUNCIL INSTITUTING FOOD
04/02. NO FOOD SAFETY BENEFIT IN STRONGER USDA-US MEAT GROUP
04/02. Russia threatens ban on all EU poultry imports
04/02. FAO fights for food chain
04/02. New rules tackle risks of life-threatening food
04/02. Food Processors Convention Opens
04/02. Veterinarians to help look out for bioterrorism
04/02. Experts on E. coli to gather in Lincoln
04/02. E. coli infection spurs lawsuit
04/02. Food companies beef up security
04/02. Attendance at 5th Annual Food Safety Summit Jumps 34% as Sec
04/02. Lead role on food safety rightly belongs to counties
04/02. Schools Toughen Sanitary Regulations

04/01. HERD ON THE HILL
04/01. MEETING WITH SECRETARY VENEMAN
04/01. PIZZA RESTAURANT FINED $300 FOR FOOD SAFETY INFRACTIONS
04/01. SPRING IS TIME FOR SPRUCING UP FOOD SAFETY HABITS
04/01. A Heaping Helping of Food Security
04/01. FOOD RESEARCH INSTITUTE ANNUAL MEETING FOOD SAFETY MEETING M
04/01. FOOD SAFETY AND QUALITY UPDATE - NO. 3
04/01. E. COLI LAWSUIT FILED AGAINST IN-N-OUT BURGER
04/01. Greece sweats possible sale of BSE-tainted meat
04/01. Russia demanding safety guarantees on U.S., European poultry
04/01. A 'too clean' upbringing may turn nuts into a killer food
04/01. Not all prefectures testing for mad cow
04/01. System to ensure quality of bottled mineral water
04/01. FDA SCIENCE: PROTECTING AMERICA'S HEALTH
04/01. Last meals? How corporate power taints safety rules
04/01. Food protection workshops
04/01. Kunkel tells county food producers to be wary
04/01. Switzerland calls for more transparency on GM food
04/01. COUNTERFEIT BABY FORMULA LANDS FUGITIVE IN JAIL
04/01. Fish ban offers food for thought
04/01. FROM FARM TO TABLE: A GLOBAL APPROACH TO FOOD SAFETY
04/01. Chemical linked to genetic defects
04/01. Promise for home food product entrepreneurs
04/01. Food Safety Equals Food Security
04/01. Get the Skinny on Food Poisoning

NEW METHODS
04/07. Live Testing for BSE on Horizon
04/02. Scientists develop first treatment for peanut allergies
04/02. Proteome at new high on mad-cow test deal
04/02. Patents for products with potential as natural antimicrobial
03/28. Fighting Listeria, the natural way


Current USDA/FDA News
FDA - INFORMATION FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
Entity Compliance Guide: Juice HACCP; Availability
OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated April 3, 2003
Inocuidad de la carne de cerdoˇ¦ desde el criadero hasta la mesa del consumidor

U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated April 1, 2003
Listing of Accredited Laboratories: Updated April 1, 2003
Spring Is Time For Sprucing Up Food Safety Habits
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated March 31, 2003
Food Safety Publications

Current Food Recall
04/07. Raw or undercooked chicken nuggets and chicken strips can cause illness
04/07. J.V. Trading Glendale Ltd. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Peanuts in Hot Sauce

04/05. Tennessee Firm Recalls Turkey Patties Due To Undeclared Allergen
04/04. J.V. Trading Glendale Ltd. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Peanuts in Hot Sauce
04/03. Macknight Smoked Foods Recalls Long Sliced Smoked Salmon
04/03. Turkey Hill Dairy Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Peanuts in Ice Cream
04/02. Possible Listeria Prompts Recall of Fish
04/01. Undeclared sulphites in WATER COOKED BAMBOO SHOOTS STRIP
04/01. Hammi, Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Egg in "Lotty Lorry Korean Crackers"
04/01. Hammi, Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Egg in "Homerun Ball Korean Crackers"
04/01. Texas Firm Recalls Refried Beans With Chorizo From Mexico


Current JOB Openings
4/07 VP Manufacturing
4/07 QC Inspector
4/07 National Industrial Sales Representative- Food microbiology
4/07 Snack Food Leader in search of a Research & Development Mana
4/07 Quality Scientist
4/07 Food Scientist
4/07 Processing Plant Manager :.
4/07 Production/Quality Supervisor
4/07 QA Manager
4/06 QA Technologist :.
4/05 Quality Control Supervisor - Food Manufacturing
4/05 Senior Product Scientist
4/04 Bi-Lingual Assistant Food Plant Manager
4/04 Off-Shift Quality Control Supervisor - Food & Beverage Manuf
4/04 Quality Control Supervisor
4/03 R&D WW Director ($170,000 - 230,000)
4/03 Manufacturing / Process Development
4/02 Production Supervisor - Food Processing
4/02 Quality Control Vice President, Food Processing :.

4/01 Quality Assurance Manager (Boca Grande Foods)
4/01 Quality Assurance Supervisor (Northern Star Company)
4/01 Food Technologist
4/01 Quality Assurance Manager

A one-agency solution to protect food supply
By Elizabeth Weise, USA TODAY
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2003-04-02-foodsafety-usat_x.htm

Protecting the U.S. food supply against bioterrorist attacks would be simple, says Marion Nestle, chair of the Nutrition and Food Studies department at New York University and author of the newly released book Safe Food: Bacteria, Biotechnology, and Bioterrorism.
It merely requires doing what expert government panels have advocated for more than a dozen years: creating one unified agency that protects the food supply from farm to table, rather than the Byzantine tangle of agencies that now oversee the nation's food in bits and pieces.
"In an age of bioterrorism, it sure makes sense to me," says Nestle, who for years has been a strong voice for consumers in a world in which the food industry has become a powerful political force.
Her previous book, Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health, took the food industry to task for compromising public health through relentless marketing to get Americans to eat more food than we need.Safe Food looks at the politics behind food safety, and the potent industry forces that oppose safety regulations and blame consumers for improperly preparing foods while denying their own accountability.Nestle also addresses terrorism and the safety of the food supply. But she acknowledges that the No. 1 need, for a unified food safety agency, is almost impossible because it would require Congress to essentially revoke the 1906 food safety laws that still govern how food in this country is regulated. The original laws assigned food oversight to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. When the Food and Drug Administration was spun off from USDA in 1930, it took oversight of the Pure Food and Drug Act with it, but left the Meat Inspection Act at the USDA. This created bizarre divisions. The USDA regulates corn dogs; the FDA regulates bagel dogs. The USDA oversees open-face meat sandwiches, the FDA closed meat sandwiches. The USDA covers pizza with meat topping; the FDA, cheese pizza. And that doesn't even begin to address the Environmental Protection Agency, which establishes pesticide tolerance limits; the U.S. Department of Commerce, whose National Marine Fisheries Service conducts voluntary seafood inspections and certifies seafood-based pet foods; and the U.S. Customs Service, which examines and collects samples of food that is imported. "Congress has members from every state, and every state has food producers who are perfectly happy with things the way they are," Nestle says.In a nation that sees 76 million cases of food poisoning a year at a very conservative estimate, our system is already failing. Deliberately tampering with it would be all too easy, she says. "If you start thinking about our wide open water supplies and our wide open food supply and our centralized food supply, you immediately realize it."The way to protect the food supply, Nestle says, is to overhaul the system, which lacks consistent rules, clear lines of authority and rational allocation of resources. But there's tremendous business and political pressure against expanded rules and consolidated oversight. Instead, we're presented with plans like irradiation, heralded as a way to protect America's food supply in one fell swoop. But irradiation comes into play because the industry doesn't want to have to worry about producing clean food, Nestle says. " 'Why not just zap it at the end and take care of anything that's there?' is the idea," she says. But that's an end-stage techno-fix. It doesn't solve the problem of dangerous bacteria in meat and produce ?bacteria that comes primarily from feces. As Carol Tucker Forman of the Consumer Federation of America famously put it: "Sterilized poop is still poop."And that's exactly what irradiation does, Nestle says. "It's cleaning up something that should never have been there. Why not just produce safe food in the first place?"It's not as if it's impossible in an industrial society. The Scandinavian countries have farm-to-table safety rules and have virtually eliminated the kinds of contamination that we've come to expect of our food in the USA, such as salmonella in eggs and chicken. So what can the average consumer do to protect themselves? "Understand that it's a political problem and it has to be dealt with politically." Nestle says. "And while you're waiting for the government to do what it's supposed to do, wash your hands and cook foods to the right temperature."

Rapid detection and response is focus of food security preparation
source from: By MARC LEVY
The Associated Press
http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/103-04022003-66834.html
HARRISBURG, Pa.
Computer mapping of Pennsylvania's livestock farms and developing plants that can signal when particular pathogens or chemicals are present are some of the works in progress to speed a response to bioterrorism in the food supply, attendees at a conference said Tuesday.Those attending the conference on protecting the nation's food supply from bioterrorism said the two initiatives are examples of a wider government funding effort focusing on rapid detection of and response to chemical or biological threats.Right now, the state Department of Agriculture is compiling a list of veterinarians who could be called on in case of an animal-health crisis and, within a year, a Department of Health database connected to hospitals that updates with new cases of food-borne illnesses in Pennsylvania should be online, state officials at the conference said."The whole key to everything is just responding quickly," said Nan Hanshaw-Roberts, the emergency programs coordinator for Pennsylvania's Bureau of Animal Health and Diagnostic Services.While some efforts at food security and safety were under way before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, additional funding for those and more bioterrorism-related measures have flowed from state and federal governments since then, conference attendees said.Most projects being funded deal with detection and response.Disease outbreaks that are both accidental and deliberate become apparent through the same channels, said Bruce A. McPheron, an associate dean for research and graduate education Penn State University's College of Agricultural Sciences.Research projects at Penn State University with homeland security applications - like developing pathogen- or chemical-detecting plants and finding ways to better and more quickly identify pathogens in humans and animals - have received more public-sector funding since Sept. 11, 2001, McPheron said.The federal Department of Agriculture is asking states to bear the weight of responding to animal disease outbreaks, Hanshaw-Roberts said.Last year, an outbreak of hog pseudorabies, or Aujeszky's disease, in south-central Pennsylvania provided a lesson to state agriculture officials on where their response resources were thin, Hanshaw-Roberts said.Now, the state is using federal and state Homeland Security dollars to buy seven mobile power washing units pulled by a pickup truck in case of an outbreak, she said.The department is computer-mapping every livestock farm in the state after one of its regional veterinarians, John Roberts, had to drive Lancaster County's backroads trying to identify livestock farms close enough to the outbreak to be quarantined, she said.The department is also providing seminars for veterinarians on the 10 most-watched-for animal viruses and signing them up to serve in case of a large-scale animal health crisis, Hanshaw-Roberts said."We hope we never need them," she said, "but it's nice to know they're there."