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4/14, 2003
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Current Food Safety News

CRUISE SHIP RULES MAKE NO SENSE
May 1, 2003
The Vancouver Sun A12
Federal Agriculture Minister Lyle Vanclief says, according to this
editorial, that tougher requirements will be imposed on cruise ships departing Vancouver -- regardless of any potential damage to this important sector of B.C.'s tourist business. Labelling on foodstuffs being carried on the ships as of next year will have
to be bilingual, to "ensure they are safe for the consumers of those products." The minister did not explain the link between the French language and safe food. Perhaps, the editorial says, he might be worried that if the ships have French chefs who cannot read English food labels they might stir up a boeuf bourguignon when they in fact meant to prepare a coquille Saint
Jacques. Another requirement, effective immediately, is that Canadian food inspectors board the ships to inspect meat products from the U.S. that will be consumed offshore. The editorial says that such bureaucratic hoops simply add a
nuisance factor to the industry which could discourage them from stopping at the port of Vancouver. The editorial also says that this is not the first time the food inspection agency has been overzealous in B.C. Last year it put a Vancouver Island farm on the brink of bankruptcy by killing a herd of water buffalo that were to create new dairy products in B.C. The animals were slaughtered for fear they might transmit mad cow disease -- despite the fact no water buffalo has ever developed the disease; they consume grass. And, sure enough, post mortem tests showed them to all be perfectly healthy. Mr. Vanclief, the
editorial concludes, needs to learn when to exercise some common sense.

ACRYLAMIDE IN FOOD: CURRENT STATE OF AFFAIRS
April 2003

FAO Food Safety and Quality Update
ftp://ftp.fao.org/es/esn/fsq_update/04.pdf
FAO/WHO held a seminar (Arusha, Tanzania, 16 March 2003) to provide for the exchange of views, an update on ongoing research, and identification of gaps in the area of acrylamide in foods. Presentations and handouts from presentations by FAO/WHO, the US, JIFSAN, the EU, Australia, Japan, and
Norway can be accessed at: www.fao.org/es/ESN/jecfa/acrylamide_en.stm

PERSPECTIVE BY MEAT PROCESSING NORTH AMERICAN source from: EDITION EDITOR, STEVE BJERKLIE.
April 30, 2003 Meat News
source from http://www.meatnews.com
Steve Bjerklie looks at the lack of funding for anti-terrorism measures in the US food industry.A funny thing happened on the way from this website. A couple weeks ago we posted a listing, in the 昆Industry Events昌 section of Meatnews.com, for what
is titled an 昆Anti-Terrorism Training Course for Food Processing
Establishments,昌 organised by USDA易s Food Safety and Inspection Service. Two things happened. One, FSIS was flooded with calls from industry people who had seen the listing and wanted to sign up. Two, following those calls, wereceived an urgent call from FSIS. No, no, no, FSIS told us. The training
course is intended for its own staff and for a few invited guests; it isn易t open to the public. The agency doesn易t have the funds to host a large meeting. It doesn易t? No, it doesn易t, not without taking from one line-item on the budget to boost another. Yet the calls from Meatnews.com readers demonstrate that their
interest in protecting meat and poultry plants from terrorism is high 〝 as well it should be, with evidence that animal-rights terrorists such as the Animal Liberation Front will not stop at vandalism and even arson to stop a meat plant or meat-science laboratory from conducting legitimate business of research.
Shouldn易t FSIS respond to that interest? Of course it should.
An element of the agency易s mission to protect the public health must be to protect meat and poultry plants from violent acts that could compromise a plant易s ability to process safe food. But FSIS易s budget constraints are real. In the event, the agency易s managers probably thought a sort of half-way open anti-terrorism training course is better than no training course at all.
The pertinent question to ask, then, is, Where易s the Department of Homeland Security? Why is it not funding an open-to-the-industry 昆Anti-Terrorism Training Course for Food Plants昌? Why is it not funding such training courses across American industry, beginning with those, such as food, transportation, energy, and medicine, which are critical to the daily survival of the populace?
In the immediate aftermath of September 11, 2001, a lot of noise was made by the usual noisemakers about the need for a cabinet-level homeland-security department. And with its authority, the Congress created just such a department last year. But it易s time to wonder: What for? The interest in the FSIS training course indicates that concern about terrorism in industry
has not subsided since 9/11. Yet the response of FSIS to that interest shows that funds are still not available to provide such training courses in an effective manner. Why? Because as it is presently constructed and administered, the Department of
Homeland Security is useless. FSIS has as good a reason as any to go to the new department for funding a timely, useful, security-sensitive government activity rather than looking under seat cushions for nickels and dimes, but so far no such funding has been made available by the Department of Homeland
Security to any agency for any anti-terrorist training courses. That易s worse than risky. It易s stupid. It易s time for Congress to revisit this department易s creation. Either the department should be made to understand that activities such as FSIS易s
training course are critical to critical industries and must be funded, or it should be abolished immediately and replaced with a better-organised, more imaginatively administered, and more clearly mandated department.

Meat processors sued in 'outbreak' listeriosis death
source from: A Philadelphia widow seeks unspecified damages from Wampler in Montco and J.L. Foods in Camden.
By Aparna Surendran
Inquirer Staff Writer
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/5756068.htm
The widow of a Philadelphia man who died last year of listeriosis has sued two meat processors where listeria bacteria was detected.
Raymond Drayton, 75, died in September after he ate deli meat contaminated with a strain of Listeria monocytogenes, a type of listeria that causes human illnesses. The strain that killed Drayton was the same "outbreak" strain blamed for 53 illnesses and eight deaths in the Northeast last year.
In October, a Montgomery County meat-processing plant, Wampler Foods Inc., recalled 27.4 million pounds of poultry. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a strain of listeria "indistinguishable" from the outbreak strain was found in drainage areas in the plant. In November, J.L. Foods Co. Inc. of Camden recalled 4.2 million pounds of poultry. The CDC said a strain of listeria "indistinguishable" from the outbreak strain was found on a sample of turkey breast.The wrongful-death lawsuit was filed April 15 by Drayton's widow, Lawese, against Pilgrim's Pride Corp., the parent company of Wampler Foods, and J.L. Foods.The lawsuit contends the two companies had "prior notice and knowledge that its meat products were contaminated with listeria, but failed to take corrective actions."It also said the companies did not utilize a "reasonably safe design in their manufacture of meat products" and did not institute a timely or proper recall of their meat products.Lawese Drayton is seeking unspecified compensatory and punitive damages. The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.Raymond Drayton "purchased ready-to-eat poultry meat a week or so prior to his death," said Jonathan Dailey, one of Drayton's lawyers. "He was diagnosed with listeria and it was his cause of death. It was the outbreak strain that killed [him]."Where he bought the meat, and which he ate, I am not going to get into," he said.Lawese Drayton had no comment yesterday. In an interview with The Inquirer in October, she said her husband had Crohn's disease, an inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. When he got sick, he thought it was symptoms of Crohn's, she said.She also said Philadelphia Health Department investigators asked her about the foods her husband had eaten prior to his death. These foods included packaged deli meat, cheese and fruit. The investigators went to the store where the Draytons shopped and bought some of the deli meat the couple liked, but the results on those meats were negative, said Robert Levenson, head of the city's Division of Disease Control, at the time.J.L. Foods could not be reached for comment yesterday. A written statement by Pilgrim's Pride said it could not comment on pending litigation.Drayton's lawsuit is the second filed against Pilgrim's Pride. In November, a lawsuit seeking a class action was filed against Wampler and its parent by a 98-year-old retired doctor, Frank Niemtzow. He died on Nov. 23.Niemtzow contended he was sickened by listeria after eating turkey deli meat processed at the Wampler plant. The lawsuit has since been dropped because too few people joined the suit, said Shanon Carson, a lawyer with Berger & Montague, a Philadelphia firm that represented Niemtzow and also represents Drayton.Listeriosis can cause flulike symptoms, including nausea and diarrhea. It is especially dangerous for pregnant women, young children, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems.

FDA says report shows food safety progress
source from:ift.or
g/news_bin/news/news_home.shtml

4/29/2003-The FDA claims that the National Academy of Sciences' report, "Scientific Criteria to Ensure Safe Food," commissioned by FDA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, reinforces the progress FDA has already made in reducing and preventing food borne illness. According to the FDA, the report specifically attributes some of this progress to the adoption of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) approach to food safety - which FDA has already applied to seafood, fresh juice, and is voluntarily applied in the dairy industry. The report also calls for clearer links, in the overall U.S. food safety system, between food safety standards and public health outcomes. FDA supports this general goal as a sound public health approach, and has already made progress in reducing the incidence of food borne illness in collaboration with Healthy People 2010 and CDC's FoodNet and Pulsnet. For more, see: http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/ANSWERS/2003/ANS01217.html.

DISTINCTIONS IN SALMONELLA DATA
April 28, 2003
Lean Trimmings
Edited by Kiran Kernellu
USDA recently reported that the prevalence of Salmonella has declined for meat and poultry products over the past two years (see last week's Lean Trimmings). However, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported last Thursday that its data does not indicate a sustained decline in major foodborne infections from Salmonella, as well as other major pathogens. Not
surprisingly, some groups have used this discrepancy as a subterfuge to criticize the meat and poultry industries on food safety. It is important to recognize that Salmonella is found in other commodities besides meat and poultry. In a report last Monday in Food Chemical News (FCN), Steve Cohen, spokesman for FSIS, pointed out that CDC's numbers
include infections from all foods and all serotypes of Salmonella. Further, Matthew Moore, a physician with CDC's National Center for Infectious Diseases, reportedly said that the most common serotype of Salmonella, S. typhimurium, which is commonly associated with beef products, has declined consistently in the last seven years. "That's good news," he said in the FCN
report. CDC pointed out certain limitations to its findings. Namely, some illnesses are acquired through nonfoodborne routes (e.g., contaminated water, person-to-person contact, and direct animal exposure) and reported rates do not represent foodborne sources exclusively. CDC's FoodNet data provides the
most comprehensive information available for these infections, but it admits that the findings shouldn't necessarily be generalized to the entire U.S. population. Of the 58,085 samples of meat and poultry FSIS took last year, 4.3% contained the pathogen Salmonella, a decrease from 5% of 45,941 samples of
meat and poultry testing positive in 2001. In fact, Salmonella across all commodities except ground chicken dropped in this period. And, the overall incidence of Salmonella in ground chicken is significantly below the baselines for prevalence. "These data tell us that we are making steady and sustained progress in reducing the incidence of Salmonella in raw meat and poultry products," said USDA Under Secretary for Food Safety Dr. Elsa Murano in a press release. Those in the industry are intimately aware that food safety is a continuous
and collaborative effort. NMA is pleased by the overall progress made thus far, as quantified by the FSIS data, and will continue to work towards heightened food safety. NMA looks forward to more successes to come. NMA reports news items that are of special interest to its readers, and provides information that they may want to be able to access. Below are links to the Federal Register, AMS, APHIS, and FSIS, respectively:
http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/aces/aces140.html
http://www.ams.usda.gov/
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/

Could 'good' virus combat E. coli O157:H7?
by Daniel Yovich on 4/25/03 for www.meatingplace.com
Washington state researchers say a harmless virus that kills the food-poisoning bacterium E. coli O157:H7 has been discovered in sheep. The British newspaper, the Independent reported that the virus, CEV1, is a bacteriophage, or "bacteria eater", and was found by chance when scientists were studying new antibiotics. Andrew Brabban, a microbiologist at Evergreen State College in Washington, told attendees this month at meeting of the Society for General Microbiology in Edinburgh, Scotland, that in a small trial in sheep, the phage reduced numbers of the toxic bacterium by 99 percent in just two days. Brabban and his colleagues found it was almost impossible to infect sheep with the E. coli O157:H7 because it kept disappearing of its own accord before the antibiotics could be administered. The team tried to re-infect the animals three times but on each occasion the bacteria mysteriously vanished. A detailed explanation of Brabban's research, posted on the Evergreen State Website, Evergreen.edu, quotes Brabban as saying "CEV1 may be a promising new way of reducing pathogen concentrations in livestock prior to slaughter via a natural, non-antibiotic approach."
When the scientists managed to extract the bacteriophage, they found that it killed 16 out of 18 toxic strains of E. coli. "That includes all the big ones you've ever heard about," Brabban said. Furthermore, CEV1 only kills eight out of 73 harmless strains of E. coli, which normally live in the gut and are essential for good health. The phage seems to persist in animals, suggesting it continues to replicate in a harmless E. coli strain after all the E coli O157:H7 bacteria have been destroyed. Finally, while bacteria can develop resistance as they do to antibiotics, the phage can out-evolve them.
Bacteriophages are preferable in treating cattle and sheep and could offer many advantages over conventional antibiotics. They are more specific and less likely to kill useful bacteria and also are passed easily from one infected individual to another, Brabban said.


Foodborne Outbreak
05/01. E. coli Infections Not Related
05/01. Arsenic Poisonings at a Church Mystify a Small Town in Maine
05/01. WATER SUPPLY RULED OUT IN MAINE POISONINGS
04/30. Typhoid outbreak in PNG school
04/30. We're not sure if it's red tide, says doc
04/30. 26 children take ill in Rajkot after eating matka kulfi, gol
04/29. ONE DEAD, 12 SICKENED AFTER CHURCH SERVICE
04/29. Health board investigates suspected Fife e-coli outbreak
04/29. Kids get ill after food fest
04/28. STILL NO DEFINITIVE SOURCE OF NORWALK
04/27. E.coli doctors keep two girls in hospital
04/24. Hotel outbreak blamed on virus -
04/23. Voivod*s Jason Newsted Hospitalized, Misses First Show In 17
04/22. FOOD POISONING, MILK, CHILDREN - CHINA (LIAONING)
04/22. Local athletes fell ill at Reno hotel
04/22. 80 AT NEVADA VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT REPORT MYSTERY ILLNESS
04/21. Eggs cause of wedding salmonella
04/20. Inmates sickened by prison food in Las Cruces
04/18. 'Agent in milk caused poisoning'
04/17. SHIGELLOSIS - USA (TEXAS)
04/09. MILK POISONING LIKELY 'DELIBERATE'
04/09. Soymilk poisons thousands, kills three


NEW METHODS
04/30. Allergen testing, portfolio expands
04/29. E. coli treatment

04/25. New Food Safety Method to Radically Improve Seafood Processi
04/25. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 Phage Project
04/24. Virus provides natural cure for lethal E. coli
04/24. Virus cleans up food poisoning bug
04/23. BAN ON OYSTERS PUT TO THE TEST
04/23. Nymox E. Coli Treatment Targets a Pressing Need
04/18. Hunting pathogens
04/17. New BSE test called conclusive; to be used for cattle, sheep
04/15. ICO POLYMERS OFFICIALLY RELEASES ANTIMICROBIAL ADDITIVE
04/15. New tools to toxic bacteria

Current USDA/FDA News
Misbranded Dietary Supplements Destroyed
Radio Waves Blast Bacteria in Fruit Juice
The Economics of Sanitation and Process Controls in Meat and Poultry Plants
Approving Ingredients Used in the Production of Meat and Poultry Products

OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated April 29, 2003
Using Applied Epidemiology and Other Tools To Protect the Public Health
Positive E. coli Test Results: Updated April 25, 2003
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated April 25, 2003
FDA Statement on "Scientific Criteria to Ensure Safe Food," a Report by the NAS
National Academy Of Sciences Concludes Performance Standards Should Be Science-Based
Guidance on Bulk Transport of juice Concentrates and Certain Shelf Stable Juices
2001 Pesticide Program Residue Monitoring Report and Database
Codex Alimentarius Commission: Intergovernmental Task Force on Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Performance Standards Should Be Science-Based And Linked To Public Health Objectives

OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated April 22, 2003
Speeches Page: Updated April 23, 2003
Dietary Supplements; Current Good Manufacturing Practice Proposed Regulation
9th Annual FDA Science Forum - "FDA Science: Protecting America's Health" April 24-25, 2003
FSIS Constituent Update: April 18, 2003
USDA Increases The Number Of Public Health Service Officers
FSIS Workforce: Expansion Of Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Program

Venta de carne a domicilio (Door-to-Door Meat Sales)
FSIS Requests Comments on Plan to Make Salmonella Testing Results Available on Web Site
USDA Data Show Incidence Of Salmonella Reduced In Raw Meat And Poultry
Progress Report on Salmonella Testing of Raw Meat and Poultry Products, 1998-2002
Public Meeting To Discuss Agenda For Codex Task Force On Fruit and Vegetable Juices
USDA Teams Up With Wynonna Judd To Help Prevent Foodborne Illness
Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) Examples of Records

Current Food Recall
05/01. AMIRA brand PEELED GARLIC IN WATER may contain dangerous bacteria
04/30. Undeclared peanut and milk proteins, and sulphites in snack bars made by SUNFRESH
04/30. Forever Cheese, Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Sulfites in Product

04/29. White Wave Recalls Vanilla Silk Soymilk
04/29. ALLERGY ALERT - Undeclared walnuts in PLAIN LIBERTY YOGOURT, 2% M. F.
04/29. Oregon Firm Recalls Ground Beef Products For Possible E. coli O157:H7
04/28. Undeclared peanut and milk proteins in snack bars made by SUNFRESH ORGANICS
04/28. Undeclared peanut and milk proteins in snack bars made by SUNFRESH ORGANICS
04/27. Consumer Alert: Listeria Warning for Queso Fresco, Fresh Cheese

04/26. Consumer Alert: Uneviscerated Processed Fish
04/25. Brooklyn Imports Has Recalled PSP Brand/ Round salted Herring
04/25. Undeclared nuts, egg, milk and wheat in "CHOCOLAT QUALITE DE LUXE"
04/25. California Firm Recalls Beef Sausage For Mislabeling
04/23. J.V. Trading Glendale Ltd. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Peanuts in Chili Sauce
04/23. Pacific Seafood Company Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Egg Whites and Wheat
04/23. Harris Teeter Recalls HT Traders Pesto alla genovese
04/23. Kusha, Inc. Issues Alert on "Royal Spanish Rice Pilaf" and "Royal Chicken Rice Pilaf"
04/23. New York Firm Recalls Bologna Products For Possible Listeria Contamination
04/18. White Wave Recalls Vanilla Silk Soymilk

04/17. Undeclared sesame seeds and peanuts in LAOBUTE BEIJING SU CANDY
04/17. Marutama Co. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Egg in Fish Cakes
04/17. Perry Food Market Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Milk Protein in Blueberry Strudel
04/17. King Richard's Snacks, Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on "King Richard Walnut Pound Cake"
04/17. Tennessee Firm Recalls Pork And Beef Products Because Of Undeclared Allergen
04/16. King Richard's Snacks Has Recalled "King Richard Walnut Pound Cake"
04/16. Perry Food Market Has Recalled Blueberry Strudel Bites
04/16. Mother's Kitchen Recalls Cheesecake Due to Undeclared Almonds
04/14. Consumer Alert: Uneviscerated Processed Fish
04/12. Baltic Star Food Has Recalled Processed Fish

Current JOB Openings

NATIONAL FOOD PROCESSORS ASSOCIATION
Position Description
Position Title: Principal Scientist, Microbiology
Primary Contacts: NFPA scientific and technical staff, NFPA members, scientists at related Associations, government agencies and academia.
Travel Requirements: Some travel required
Primary Work Area: Laboratory
Position Objective
The Principle Scientist, Microbiology is a nationally recognized expert who performs research of value to NFPA members and serves as an expert technical resource to NFPA staff and members in areas of food microbiology and food safety.

In order to perform this job successfully, the incumbent must be able to perform each essential job function satisfactorily. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable an individual with disabilities as defined in the ADA to perform the essential functions. In addition, the representative knowledge, skills and abilities required in candidates for this position are listed as a selection criteria guideline.
Essential Job Functions - the core job duties and responsibilities. Other duties may be assigned.

Job Function #1: Develops research programs designed to further the research goals of the Association and its membership. Has an in depth understanding of laboratory procedures, experimental design and data analysis. Conducts research in addition to supervising and mentoring related staff on designing, planning, and conducting experiments, and analyzing and reporting results.

Job Function #2: Prepares research findings for presentations to various audiences. Demonstrates technical expertise by continued publications in scientific and technical journals. Prepares presentations for delivery to NFPA staff, members and other audiences. Displays outstanding oral and written communication skills

Job Function #3: Identifies potential sources of outside funding for NFPA research studies. Pursues and obtains outside contract proposals and grants.

Job Function #4: Develops training programs in areas of expertise and serves as instructor of NFPA and FPI courses.

Job Function #5: Serves as a technical expert in area of expertise. Assists in developing NFPA policy based on science. Reads current literature and maintains contacts with appropriate external sources (industry, academia, and regulatory) in order to be up-to-date. Briefs NFPA members on the latest information and issues in areas of expertise.

Job Function #6: Manages the Research Foundation Program. Responsibilities include overseeing of current projects and budgets, developing and implementing new proposals of industry and government interest, and coordinating with NFPA staff to support these project demands.

Job Function #7: Manages the Claims technical activities. Responsibilities include review of exhibits analyzed, review of findings and timeliness of response, supervising staff on activities, coordinating with the Claims legal staff and potentially acting as an expert witness when required.


Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSA's) Requirements

﹞ Education and Experience: PhD. in microbiology or food science is required. 10+ years experience in food processing or related work environment including project management and staff supervision responsibilities.
﹞ Other Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: Incumbent will come to this position with nationally or internationally recognized expertise in food microbiology, food safety, risk assessment, biotechnology, HACCP or a related area; strong publications and presentations record. Knowledgeable of the standard sources of information on food processing and food safety. Computer literate with excellent written, platform and interpersonal communication skills and the ability to work in a team environment. Travel will be required.

The Escherichia coli O157:H7 Phage Project

SAFETY OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS
Spring 2003
Safefood Newsletter Volume VII, No. 3
http://www.colostate.edu/Orgs/safefood/
Although Easter is over, egg safety is still a concern. Many may still be looking for ways to use up some of those leftover eggs. Popular foods such
as hollandaise and b?rnaise sauce, mousse, souffl? meringue, and homemade ice cream can present a common health risk. If made with raw or possibly
undercooked eggs, these foods may contain the bacteria Salmonella Enteritidis. While illnesses linked to Salmonella Enteritidis have remained steady since 1999, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that when a food source is identified in a Salmonella outbreak, undercooked and raw shell eggs are the most common culprits. Salmonella can cause intestinal
infections that can be quite serious (or even deadly) for groups of individuals considered to be at higher risk of foodborne illness, including young children, the elderly, and those with weak immune systems.
If present, Salmonella Enteritidis is usually contained in the yolk; however, researchers cant rule out the bacteria being in egg whites too.
So, everyone is advised against eating raw or undercooked egg yolks and whites, or products containing raw or undercooked eggs. Here are some safe handling tips for foods made with eggs:
Only buy clean, refrigerated eggs with uncracked shells. Wash hands, utensils, equipment and work areas with hot, soapy water before and after contact with eggs. Dont keep eggs out of the refrigerator for
more than two hours. Egg mixtures are safe if they reach 160F. Start with a cooked base by
heating gently over low heat while stirring constantly until the mixture reaches 160F in the center. Meringue that tops a pie should be safe if baked at 350F for about 15 minutes. Chiffon pies and fruit whips made with raw, beaten, uncooked egg whites may not be safe. To reduce the risk, substitute pasteurized dried egg whites, whipped cream or whipped topping. Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160F as
measured with a food thermometer. Sources: 1) Egg and Egg Product Safety. FSIS-USDA Fact Sheet, April 2001. Available at www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/eggfacts.htm
2) Focus on Shell Eggs. FSIS-USDA Fact Sheet, rev. Feb. 2003. Available
at: www.fsis.gov/OA/pubs/shelleggs.htm.

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator
http://www.ift.org/news_bin/news/news_home.shtml
4/21/2003-The USDA's Economic Research Service (ERS) estimates of the costs of illness and premature death for a number of foodborne illnesses have been used in regulatory cost-benefit and impact analyses. Like all cost estimates, the ERS estimates include assumptions about disease incidence, outcome severity, and the level of medical, productivity, and disutility costs. Changes to any of these assumptions could change the cost estimates and, as a result, change the way policymakers rank risks, prioritize spending, and formulate food safety policies. The agency has developed a Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator to provide information on the assumptions behind foodborne illness cost estimates and gives users a chance to make their own assumptions and calculate their own cost estimates.
[Ed: Visit link below to view the full article]
Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator

Cockroaches Linked to 50 Known Pathogens; Orkin Pest Control Warns Spring and Summer Bring a Rise in Insects and Potential Spread of Disease
Business Editors
source from :
http://www.businesswire.com/
ATLANTA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--April 17, 2003--Whether cockroaches carry Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is unclear, but the most common household pest is a known carrier of up to 50 different known pathogens. As the weather warms, homeowners can take basic steps to keep these pests out of their homes, according to Orkin Pest Control.
In Hong Kong, Deputy Director of Health Leung Pak-yin has speculated that cockroaches carried SARS, the respiratory illness that has killed to date more than 150 people in 22 countries, from flat to flat in an apartment block where more than 300 new cases arose in just a few days. There are approximately 3,500 species of cockroaches worldwide, with about 70 species in the United States.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says there is no current evidence that cockroaches carry SARS, which has infected approximately 3,200 people. However, cockroaches are known to carry 50 known pathogens including pneumonia, food poisoning, salmonella and typhoid. According to The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAI), cockroaches can also cause asthma, especially in children.
Cockroaches pick up germs on the spines of their legs and bodies as they crawl through decaying matter or sewage and then carry these onto food or food surfaces. Germs that cockroaches eat from decaying matter or sewage are protected while in their bodies and may remain infective for several weeks longer than if they had been exposed to cleaning agents, rinse water, or just sunlight and air.
Orkin Pest Control Technical Manager Frank Meek says roaches enter homes and businesses in search of food, water and shelter. "Once they get in, roaches can be hard to force out because they move quickly, reproduce frequently and are hardy," states Meek. "For every cockroach you see, there can easily be several hundred more hiding behind your wall."
April is National Pest Management Month, and a good time to make homes as "roach unfriendly" as possible as the weather warms. Meek says homeowners can help prevent cockroaches by following these steps:


-- Eliminate food sources by cleaning up spills and storing food in sealed containers;
-- Inspect possible entry points and eliminate any openings, no matter how small (roaches can fit into cracks as thin as a quarter);
-- Remove items that tend to harbor cockroaches, such as cardboard boxes or piles of newspapers;
-- Store garbage cans in dry places, not under the kitchen sink;
-- Trim tree limbs so they do not hang over the house;
-- Correct moisture problems such as a leaking roof or blocked gutter;
-- Consider regular treatment by a licensed professional in and around the home.

"Many of the cockroach infestation problems we see during home inspections could have been prevented if homeowners had taken basic steps toward eliminating the key sources of roaches," Meek says.
For more information on cockroach prevention and elimination, a free pamphlet is available at www.orkin.com. Homeowners also can call 1-800-800-ORKIN for a free inspection. The Orkin Pest Control Web site (www.orkin.com) now includes a link to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site (www.cdc.gov/ncidod/sars) for updates and more information on SARS.
Founded in 1901, Atlanta-based Orkin Pest Control is a leading provider of pest and termite control services throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico, serving 1.7 million customers. As part of its ongoing commitment to insect education, the company sponsors a variety of community and national initiatives to show the vital role insects play in the ecosystem. Orkin Pest Control is a wholly owned subsidiary of Rollins, Inc., which is traded on the New York Stock Exchange (ROL).
--30--JAH/at*
CONTACT: Orkin Pest Control, Atlanta
Martha Craft, 404/888-2217
mcraft@rollinscorp.com or
Jackson Spalding
Allyson Park, 678/984-7047
apark@jacksonspalding.com

STILL NO DEFINITIVE SOURCE OF NORWALK
April 24, 2003
Reno Gazette-Journal4 Don Cox
Health officials were cited as saying Thursday that the Norwalk virus that sickened dozens of teenage female volleyball players possibly came from
outside Reno, but potential local sources haven易t been eliminated and that the number of people complaining of illness now tops 300.
The story says that results of testing on workers at a local casino included in the investigation did not reveal signs of the virus, suggesting the germ
could have been brought to Reno, officials said.
Alan Dreher, head of the environmental unit易s food inspection program, was quoted as saying, "That易s a pretty good indication to me that the stuff was
brought in and not transmitted from employees."
Tracie Douglas, spokeswoman for the Washoe District Health Department易s environmental division, was quoted as saying, "The source could have come from almost anywhere at this point, including here. The only fact we have right now is we have Norwalk virus. That易s why we have to do all the
investigation and why we have to run it through computer and (scientific) programs to see if we can find a common denominator or source."
The health department received the results Thursday from tests on stool samples from the first eight of about 30 casino workers who complained of
illness. 昆They were negative for Norwalk,昌 Dreher said.

Current Food Safety News

05/01. Fallout Over Irradiated Food in School Lunches
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05/01. FEDS URGED TO MAKE WATER SAFE
05/01. FOOD PRODUCTS AND PAN PHARMACEUTICALS (AUSTRALIA ONLY)
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05/01. LAWMAKERS SEEK ANSWERS ON TAINTED SCHOOL FOOD
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04/30. CRUISE SHIPS GET NEW RULES ON FOOD
04/30. Radio Waves Blast Bacteria in Fruit Juice
04/30. What is the cost of food safety?
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04/30. EU posts revised opinion on food irradiation
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04/30. FDA Plans Food-Tracking System

04/29. CONSUMERS URGE UN COMMITTEE TO CALL FOR IMPROVED LABELS
04/29. POSTED RESULTS SCORE HIGH WITH TORONTONIANS
04/29. EU PROVIDES Q&A ON FOOD SAFETY POLICY
04/29. GROUND BEEF BEST PRACTICES UPDATE
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04/29. NAS REPORT: "SCIENTIFIC CRITERIA TO ENSURE SAFE FOOD"
04/29. REVISION OF THE OPINION ON THE IRRADIATION OF FOOD
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04/29. Fallout Over Irradiated Food in School Lunches
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04/28. BEWARE OF WISHY-WASHY ATTITUDES TO HAND-WASHING
04/28. SOME SCHOOL FOOD TAINTED IN ILLINOIS
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04/28. Coping With Food Allergies
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04/27. Genescan hits Japan
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04/26. Pass the ketchup, hold the radiation?
04/26. Agriculture department stops leaky food shipment bound for s
04/26. Dietz & Watson adds safety steps
04/26. Group questions lettuce safety

04/25. AMI Statement on NAS Report, US Food Safety Standards
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04/25. Small Dairy Farmers Oppose Raw Milk Rules
04/25. VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS UPDATE 2003 (12)
04/25. PERFORMANCE STANDARDS SHOULD BE SCIENCE-BASED AND LINKED TO
04/25. FOOD SAFETY
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04/25. Genetic study concludes nearly all deer prone to CWD
04/25. Bill seeks to outlaw the sale of old goods
04/25. Petition filed to stay release of spurious betel nut consign
04/25. Panel: Gov't Authority Over Food in Doubt
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04/24. FOOD SAFETY HELP FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
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04/24. Fined for Illegal Shipments
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04/23. SAFE THAWING GUIDELINES DIFFER FOR CONSUMERS VS. FOOD SERVIC
04/23. IS PINK TURKEY MEAT SAFE?
04/23. SAFETY OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS
04/23. FDA ALERT ON CANTALOUPES FROM MEXICO
04/23. WHAT IS ACRYLAMIDE? UPDATED
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04/23. FSIS PUBLISHES NOTICE UPDATING DIRECTIVE 10,010.1
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04/23. SALMONELLA SET TESTS
04/23. THAILAND: FDA will enforce GM labelling from next month
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04/23. Safety for By-Products
04/23. Food Safety Help for Developing Countries
04/23. New Veal Standards to be Set
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04/23. Veneman to Address Hemispheric Forum on Food Safety
04/23. Single market and food safety

04/22. WHAT IS NORWALK VIRUS? - UPDATED
04/22. NORTH AMERICA GIVEN WORLDWIDE MANAGEMENT OF SQF
04/22. NEW WATER STANDARDS WILL LEAVE THE GLASS HALF EMPTY
04/22. PROSECUTION BULLETIN: JAMES L. MOOD FISHERIES LIMITED FINED
04/22. PROSECUTION BULLETIN: RICHMOND COMPANY FINED $3,000 FOR VIOL
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04/22. Wegmans exec to speak at irradiation conference
04/22. Eating Fish While You're Pregnant
04/22. Parents of O-157 victims file lawsuits (Japan)
04/22. Customs to crack down on risky food imports
04/22. Quality Assurance Expert Donald C. Countryman Joins Pennexx

04/21. TECHNICAL AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGER JOINS ALASKA
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04/21. EATING FISH KILLED MY UNBORN BABIES
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04/20. Preliminary FoodNet data for 2003
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04/19. Food importers seek easing of rules
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