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5/21, 2003
ISSUE:66

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Statement by Veneman Regarding Canada¡¯s Announcement of BSE Investigation
source from : Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman
Regarding Canada¡¯s Announcement of BSE Investigation
May 20, 2003
¡°I have spoken with Canada¡¯s Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister Lyle Vanclief a short time ago about Canada¡¯s investigation and feel that all appropriate measures are being taken in what appears to be an isolated case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Information suggests that risk to human health and the possibility of transmission to animals in the United States is very low. ¡°USDA is placing Canada under its BSE restriction guidelines and will not accept any ruminants or ruminant products from Canada pending further investigation. We are dispatching a technical team to Canada to assist in the investigation and will provide more detailed information as it becomes available.¡± Additional Information USDA MARKS PROGRESS ON BSE PREVENTION ACTION ¡°The United States remains diligent in its BSE surveillance and prevention efforts. In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration prohibited the use of most mammalian protein in the manufacture of animal feed intended for cows and other ruminants to stop the way the disease is thought to spread.¡°Since 1989, the U.S. government has taken a series of preventive actions to protect against this animal disease. This includes USDA prohibitions on the import of live ruminants, such as cattle, sheep, goats and most ruminant products from countries that have or are considered to be at risk for having BSE.¡°In fiscal year 2002, USDA tested 19,990 cattle for BSE using a targeted surveillance approach designed to test the highest risk animals, including downer animals (animals that are non-ambulatory at slaughter), animals that die on the farm, older animals and animals exhibiting signs of neurological distress.¡±

WHAT IS MAD COW DISEASE (BSE)?
May 20/03
www.foodsafetynetwork.ca
Mad Cow Disease or Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is a chronic
degenerative illness that affects the central nervous system of cattle. It
is part of a family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform
encephalopathies, or TSEs, whose different forms affect different species of
animals. All TSEs are believed to be linked to an abnormal form of a protein
known as a prion. Accumulation of this abnormal protein leads to a
sponge-like appearance of the affected brain, causing neurological illness
and eventual death. The disease has a long incubation period of four to five
years, but is fatal for cattle within weeks to months of its onset.
Diagnosis of BSE is not possible in live animals and can only be done by
examining an animal's brain after death. Few cases of BSE have occurred
outside of the United Kingdom (UK).
A human form of TSE was first diagnosed in the 1920s and was named
Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (CJD) after the two German scientists who described
the illness. Classical CJD (cCJD) occurs naturally in the population at a
rate of approximately one person per million individuals per year, making it
extremely rare. On average, 30 Canadians are diagnosed with cCJD each year,
with an average age of 60 years. There is no known cure for the disease. In
the early 1990s, British researchers noted a new illness having many of the
classical CJD symptoms, but with several unique characteristics. Most
notably, the emerging illness affected people in their late 20s. In 1996,
researchers confirmed a new variant of CJD, now called vCJD. The cause of
vCJD appears to be the consumption of beef and beef products from cattle
infected with BSE. Following this discovery, strict measures were put in
place in the UK and elsewhere to control the spread of BSE among cattle and
to minimize the risk to human and animal health.
Scientists believe that the BSE epidemic in Great Britain was caused by
feeding cattle meat and bone meal supplements that had inadvertently become
contaminated with the disease agent. This occurred in the late 1970s and
early 1980s, and established the infection in cattle. It was then magnified
by the practice of feeding rendered material from slaughtered cattle back to
other cattle. The agent that causes BSE is very resistant to normal
disinfection procedures such as heat. This means that the agent may not be
destroyed in the rendering process, and could remain active in the rendered
material. In 1988, Great Britain banned the use of this rendered material in
animal feeds, thus removing potentially contaminated material from the food
chain. In addition, other possible methods of transmission are still being
scientifically investigated.
What about BSE in Canada?
For several years, Canada has banned the import of European beef and has
restricted the importation of beef and beef products from any country that
is not designated as BSE-free. Canada has an active surveillance program in
which the brains of all cattle that may potentially have BSE are tested for
the disease. BSE has been a reportable disease in Canada since 1990, meaning
that any suspect case of BSE must be reported to a federal veterinarian
immediately. Canadian veterinarians and livestock producers have been
alerted to the signs of BSE. Adult cattle exhibiting suspicious symptoms are
destroyed and subjected to a laboratory examination for BSE.
On May 20, 2003, Canadian officials reported that a single case of BSE was
diagnosed in Alberta; the slaughtered cow was sent for rendering and did not
enter the food chain. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency and provincial
officials are conducting a comprehensive investigation to determine where
the cow came from, its movement between herds and how its remains were
processed. Authorities are also tracking the movement of other livestock
from the same farm. This cow was part of a herd of 150 head. After all
testing on the herd is completed, it and other herds determined to be at
risk of BSE contamination will be destroyed in order to minimize any risk of
transmission. The one and only previous case of BSE diagnosed in Canada was
found in a beef cow that had been imported from Britain in 1987. The animal
was destroyed and additional measures were taken immediately by the federal
government to deal with any risk that Canadian cattle might have been
affected.
In the summer of 2002, the first Canadian case of vCJD was reported in a
male resident of Saskatchewan. Following the death of the patient, an
autopsy was performed and vCJD was confirmed. The disease was likely
acquired in the UK, where the patient lived and visited during the 1980s and
1990s; BSE was widespread in cattle herds in the UK during that time period.
Information Sources:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency. (2003). Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE) . Retrieved May 20, 2003, from
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/bseesb/bseesbe.sht
ml
Canadian Food Inspection Agency. (2003). Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE, also known as Mad Cow Disease) Retrieved May 20, 2003, from
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/bseesb/bsefaqe.sht
ml
Canadian Food Inspection Agency. (2003). Investigation into a Case of Bovine
Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Alberta. Retrieved May 20, 2003, from
www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/newcom/2003/20030520bge.shtml
Health Canada. (2003). Frequently asked questions about variant Creutzfeldt
- Jakob Disease (variant CJD). Retrieved May 20, 2003, from
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/diseases/cjd/bg2.html
Health Canada. (2002). Mad Cow or Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in
Europe. Retrieved May 20, 2003, from
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/pphb-dgspsp/tmp-pmv/2001/bse_e.html
Health Canada. (2003). First Canadian case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob
Disease (variant CJD). Retrieved May 20, 2003, from
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/diseases/cjd/index.html
For more information on Mad Cow Disease/BSE or other food safety topics,
please call the Food Safety Network toll-free at 1-866-50-FSNET or visit our
website at www.foodsafetynetwork.ca

CHRONOLOGY-THE SPREAD OF MAD COW DISEASE
May 20/03
Reuters
CHICAGO - Following are key dates in the spread of mad cow disease, believed
to be transmitted by contaminated meat-and-bone meal fed to cattle.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that of the 125
cases of the human form of the disease worldwide, almost all had
multiple-year exposure in Britain between 1980 and 1996 during the
occurrence of a large outbreak among cattle.
About 100 people have died from the disease in Europe.
In Britain, where the disease was first diagnosed, more than 178,000 cattle
have been affected. Mad cow has also been found in cattle in nearly 20 other
European countries.
1986 - NOVEMBER - Britain makes first diagnosis of bovine spongiform
encephalopathy (BSE), a new disease in cattle.
1988 - JULY 7 - Britain announces that all cows known to be infected with
BSE will be destroyed as a precautionary measure.
1989 - Britain bans human consumption of certain offal, including brain,
spinal cord, thymus, spleen and tonsils.
The United States prohibits the import of live ruminants from countries
where BSE is known to exist in native cattle.
1990 - EC Commission bans imports to the Continent from Britain of cattle
over 6 months old.
1993 - JANUARY - The epidemic among cattle in Britain peaks at about 1,000
new cases reported per week.
DECEMBER - One beef cow in Canada diagnosed with BSE. Authorities say it
had been imported from Britain in 1987. The animal carcass and the herd it
came from were destroyed.
1994 - EU approves proposal to ban exports of meat containing bones from
herds that had not been free of BSE for six years instead of two.
1996 - British government admits for the first time that BSE could be
transmitted to humans in a variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD).
The classical form of CJD is a slow degenerative disease in humans affecting
the central nervous system that affects about one person in a million
worldwide each year.
MARCH - Japan bans imports of meat-and-bone meal from Britain.
MARCH 23 - Fast food giant McDonald's suspends the sale of British beef
products in its restaurants in Britain.
MARCH 27 - EU ban on British beef and beef products announced.
APRIL 24 - Britain offers to slaughter up to 40,000 cows in a bid to speed
up elimination of mad cow disease. This offer is later increased to 80,000.
JULY 22 - EU scientists say BSE can infect sheep.
AUG 1 - Britain's agriculture ministry confirms that mad cow disease can be
passed from cow to calf.
AUG 19 - A British coroner rules that Peter Hall, a 20-year-old vegetarian
who died of the vCJD, caught it from eating beef burgers as a child. The
verdict is the first to legally link a human death to mad cow disease.
1997 - The European Parliament condemns European Commission President
Jacques Santer and Britain for serious errors in the way they handled the
mad cow crisis.
AUG 7 - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibits feeding of most
mammalian proteins to ruminants.
DEC 3 - Britain bans the sale of unboned beef as a precautionary move to
stop the risk of mad cow disease.
DEC 12 - The United States extends its restrictions on imports of ruminants
and their products to include all countries in Europe due to concerns about
widespread risk factors and inadequate surveillance for BSE.
1999 - AUG 1 - An export ban on British beef following the mad cow disease
scandal is lifted after 3-1/2 years.
SEPT 22 - The British government's chief medical adviser warns that the
country could face a possible epidemic of human mad cow disease in the years
ahead.
OCT 29 - The European Commission's top scientists give British beef a clean
bill of health.
2000 - JUNE 29 - British Agriculture Minister Nick Brown announces that a
cow, born after measures were introduced to eradicate mad cow disease, had
been found to have BSE.
OCT 26 - Britain's official report into BSE criticizes officials for
consistently playing down the risk to humans and failing to properly
coordinate a government response.
British government announces compensation plan for the victims of the human
form of mad cow disease.
DEC 7 - The United States prohibits all imports of rendered animal protein
products, regardless of species, from Europe.
2001 - SEPT 10 - Japan's Agriculture Ministry says a dairy cow tested
positive for mad cow disease in the Chiba area near Tokyo, the first
outbreak in Asia.
OCT 18 - Japan's Health Ministry begins testing for BSE all cows
slaughtered for beef.
2002 - APRIL 19 - U.S. health officials report the first suspected case of
new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 22-year-old British woman living
in Florida. They said she most likely contracted the disease while living in
Britain.
AUG 8 - Health Canada says a Canadian man died in Saskatchewan from vCJD,
apparently after contracting the disease in Britain.
2003 - JAN 15 - U.S. Agriculture Department says it tripled the number of
U.S. cattle tested for BSE in the past year to 19,990 head. The U.S. cattle
herd in January totaled 96.1 million animals.
MAY 20 - Canada says one eight-year-old cow in Alberta tested positive for
BSE, Canada's first case since 1993 and first of a nonimported animal.
Canada Agriculture Minister Lyle Vanclief said the animal "did not enter the
food chain."
MAY 20 - The United States bans imports of Canadian cattle, beef and other
ruminants and ruminant products "pending further investigation."

Food Illnesses Reduced by Pall Filtration Technology

source from: Business Editors
http://www.businesswire.com
EAST HILLS, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 15, 2003--Seventy six million people suffer from illnesses caused by consuming contaminated food or beverages each year in the United States.
Attention is turning to water as a culprit in the growing number of foodborne outbreaks. Removing spoilage organisms and other impurities from water used in food and beverage processing was the subject of a presentation about Pall Corporation's (NYSE:PLL) technology at the annual conference on Practical Membrane Technology sponsored by the Texas A&M University System.
The growing concern about contamination from pathogens has contributed to more stringent government regulations to ensure safety of the food supply. There are more than 250 known foodborne diseases. Pall membrane microfilters consistently remove harmful contaminants so food and beverage producers can meet or exceed standards for purity.
"As the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issues new guidance documents to protect the food supply, the industry is adopting preventive measures to ensure product safety," said Tom Wingfield, Vice President of Marketing, Pall Food and Beverage. "Membranes are the most precise way to help maintain product quality and are the best way to enclose and protect food processes from both known and unknown contaminants."
A host of pathogens, such as bacteria, parasites and viruses can contaminate the water used to produce soft drinks, milk, bottled water, beer, wine, and many food products. Untreated or ineffectively treated water can cause foodborne illnesses, some of which can be life threatening. Each year in the United States 325, 000 people are hospitalized and more than 5,000 die from foodborne disease.
Organisms such as the waterborne parasite Cryptosporidium are resistant to disinfection and temperature treatments. Pall membrane microfilters provide an absolute barrier from these parasites and their oocysts. They are capable of removing more than common water contaminants since much of the Company's technology for water purification was developed for industries, including the pharmaceutical industry, that require ultra-pure water.
"Our background in cell biology provides an added benefit to our customers as we leverage our technologies and experience across every stage of food and beverage production to ensure that products consistently meet the highest standards of safety and quality," added Mr. Wingfield. A variety of Pall media in microscopic pore sizes are used for clarification, sterilization and final filtration steps in food and beverage processing.
Over $200 million in Pall Corporation's annual sales are derived from applying its water purification technologies for a wide variety of industrial uses. Water processing applications represent the fastest growing area of Pall's business.
In addition to discussing how membranes can help protect the safety of food and beverages, Mr. Wingfield also reviewed how membranes can be used to help the industry more efficiently cope with the growing problem of water scarcity. Water is one of the most common raw materials used by industry. There is an increasing need to reuse and recycle water to conserve it. For example, Pall membrane filtration systems can be used by industry to transform and recycle plant wastewater or water from other impotable sources for applications such as cleaning equipment and rinsing bottles. These filtration systems are flexible in size and scope and can be configured for each specific application to help industry more cost-effectively and efficiently reuse limited resources and also play a role in protecting our environment.
The Practical Membrane Technology conference is an annual event organized by the Food Protein Research Development Center of The Texas A&M University System in College Station, Texas. Leading experts from academia and industry attend to discuss new developments, applications and pilot plant demonstrations related to membrane technology.

About Pall Corporation

Pall Corporation is the global leader in the rapidly growing field of filtration, separations and purification. Pall's business is organized around two broad markets: Life Sciences and Industrial. The Company provides leading-edge products to meet the demanding needs of customers in biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, transfusion medicine, semiconductors, municipal drinking water and aerospace. Total revenues for fiscal 2002 were about $1.3 billion. The Company is headquartered in East Hills, New York. Further information can be found on its Web site at http://www.pall.com.

E. coli lawsuits restored
Meat producers target of ruling
By David Migoya, Denver Post Staff Writer
source from: http://www.denverpost.com/
The meat industry can be held accountable for selling any kind of meat - not just ground beef - that contains potentially lethal pathogens, a Wisconsin appeals court ruled Tuesday. The decision by a three-judge panel reinstates a handful of Milwaukee lawsuits that blame Excel Corp. and its Fort Morgan slaughterhouse for an E. coli outbreak that sickened more than 60 people and killed a 3-year-old girl in 2000.The judge who dismissed the lawsuits early last year relied largely on a 1999 U.S. Department of Agriculture rule that says whole meat, such as steaks and roasts, that has E. coli on its surface - even if it's the deadly 0157:H7 variant of the bacteria - can be sold. Cooking, the USDA says, kills E. coli on the surface of meat.Federal law says that raw meat that is adulterated, or unfit for consumption, cannot be sold. The appellate court said Congress decided in 1996 that the word "adulterated" extended to all cuts of meat, not just to hamburger, and the USDA lacked the authority to narrow the definition.Excel will appeal to the Wisconsin Supreme Court, spokesman Mark Klein said."It would appear the court is disagreeing with the federal government as to what is adulterated product," Klein said.The key to the ruling, said Denis Stearns, the lawyer who successfully argued the appeal, is corporate accountability."The court held that Excel should be accountable to those who are injured by their products rather than shielded from liability by the Federal Meat Inspection Act, a statute intended to protect the public, not meat companies," he said .The lawsuits allege the company produced contaminated tri-tip, a cut of sirloin, then sold it to Sizzler restaurants. Despite warning labels to handle the meat carefully, workers at two restaurants used unsanitized countertops to prepare the tainted meat and cross-contaminated fruit destined for salad bars.All the victims ate from one of the Sizzler salad bars, including Brianna Kriefall, who died after eating melon."The court also rejected the industry's argument that it's the consumer's fault if they get sick," Stearns said.The ruling could mean companies that produce any tainted meat, not just tainted hamburger, can be sued much like any manufacturer that produces a defective product.Meat industry experts said it's unclear what impact the ruling could have."It has the potential to set things in motion that would be inconsistent with how the Meat Inspection Act is administered," said Mark Dopp, senior vice president and general counsel for the American Meat Institute, a trade group that supported dismissing of the cases."It could open the door to cases being filed on not only E. coli 0157:H7, but all the other pathogens on raw products that we can't make sterile as a practical matter," Dopp said.Consumer groups praised the ruling."This is a striking victory," said Karen Taylor Mitchell, executive director of Safe Tables Our Priority, a group that represents families and victims of food-borne illnesses.The Sizzler chain last year settled with the victims who sued.

Current Food Safety News

05/21. FRENCH EXPERT SAYS RISK TO HUMANS EXTREMELY LOW
05/21. Canadian Case Doesn't Alarm Mad Cow Expert
05/21. WHAT IS MAD COW DISEASE (BSE)?
05/21. BEEF INFORMATION CENTRE HAS FAITH IN CANADA'S BEEF SUPPLY
05/21. CHRONOLOGY-THE SPREAD OF MAD COW DISEASE
05/21. ANALYZING HEALTH, SAFETY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS
05/21. BIFSCO EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
05/21. NEW BOARD MEMBER AND CHAIR OF SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE APPOINTED
05/21. BACTERIA CONVERT FOOD PROCESSING WASTE TO HYDROGEN
05/21. BOTTLED WATER: MORE THAN JUST A STORY ABOUT SALES GROWTH: ST
05/21. FOOD SAFE, INC. SUPPORTS PROPOSED LEGISLATION BY SENATOR DUR
05/21. CSPI ANNOUNCES CONFERENCE ON "CONFLICTED SCIENCE"
05/21. IMPORT REQUIREMENTS FOR MEXICAN CANTALOUPES
05/21. Canada¡¯s BSE Situation: Industry Responds
05/21. Food Safety in Europe
05/21. An end to vCJD epidemic threat
05/21. Canada Hunts for Mad Cow Case Origins
05/21. Food, cattle industries scramble to minimize damage from mad
05/21. More Alberta cattle quarantined
05/21. Processors caught beefing up chicken
05/21. Ruling: Eatery, La. equally liable in oyster case
05/21. Salmonella Case Settled
05/21. Jail's caterer has history of violations
05/21. Procedures set to prevent E. coli outbreak at county fair
05/21. Food intolerance at the FSA
05/21. "Mad cow" disease in Canada UPDATED
05/21. Meat is safe, experts say
05/21. New laws could outlaw vintage wines
05/21. Pan recall partially revoked
05/21. German risk agency welcomes new head
05/21. Follow these tips for food safety at your picnic
05/21. Accused butcher's son 'victim of E.coli'
05/21. Sprout growers gain revenge

05/20. Statement by Veneman Regarding Canada¡¯s Announcement of BSE Investigation
05/20. Mad cow disease reported in Canada
05/20. REPORTS OF BAD WATER SOAR; DANGEROUS BACTERIA DISCOVERED IN
05/20. Course for Antibiotic Residue Testing in Swine
05/20. Smart labelling seminar
05/20. Meat inspectors' clout questioned
05/20. Milk should stay on the menu, health officials say
05/20. Keeping beef carcasses clean can be difficult
05/20. Lack of oversight and will put consumers at risk

05/19. An Unseen Killer's Toll
05/19. FOOD IRRADIATION UPDATE
05/19. SCIENTISTS CONFIRM NO LINK BETWEEN PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO MERC
05/19. FOOD SAFETY LAW ENACTED BY DIET
05/19. FDA issues guidance on animal feed
05/19. FDA issues draft guidance on use deer and elk in animal feed
05/19. Study finds no detectable risk from mercury in ocean seafood

05/18. Aussie budget confirms commitment to food safety
05/18. FSAI wraps knuckles over mislabelling
05/18. Study of Prenatal Exposure to Mercury in Fish “Pprovides Impo

05/17. Dubai Municipality awards Jebel Ali International Hotels
05/17. NZFSA warns of toxic fish
05/17. DWTC conferred award by Dubai Municipality for improving foo
05/17. How food safety can be improved

05/16. Is education key to acceptance of irradiation?
05/16. Microbiologist Katherine Swanson Wins NFPA Food Safety Award
05/16. Local mom urges support for kids with severe allergies
05/16. White Hall family knows hardships of many others
05/16. Georgia Enforces Gulf Oyster Rules
05/16. Food Illnesses Reduced by Pall Filtration Technology
05/16. Beef irradiation pilot survey sparks controversy
05/16. INGESTED FLUORIDE NEEDLESS; CHILDREN DANGEROUSLY OVERDOSED,
05/16. NEARLY A THIRD OF RESERVE WATER SYSTEMS POSE RISK
05/16. NOTICE TO FOOD EDITORS - CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION AGENCY
05/16. AMI/NCBA PRESS RELEASE: AMI FOUNDATION, BEEF CHECKOFF JOINTL
05/16. U OF A PLANS DISEASE-FIGHTING CENTRE: $17M RESEARCH
05/16. E. coli lawsuits restored


Foodborne Outbreak
05/21. Mushrooms blamed for salmonella
05/21. Eight employees complain of food poisoning at Senate canteen
05/20. IRAQ: CHOLERA CONFIRMED IN BASRA
05/19. Norwalk-type virus lays low soldiers in 62nd Medical
05/16. Memorable moment for 520th: 270 people throwing up
05/14. Twelve people at The Willough get food poisoning from bad sw
05/14. HEP A CASES UNDER INVESTIGATION

NEW METHODS
05/21. CANADIAN VACCINE POSSIBLE WITHIN A YEAR: FOR CATTLE, ELK

05/21. NEW RIBOPRINTER¢ç SYSTEM RELEASE FROM DUPONT QUALICON

05/21. HART BIOTECHNOLOGY ACQUIRES EXCLUSIVE WORLDWIDE RIGHTS TO PA

05/20. PHAGE THERAPY COULD REMOVE FOODBORNE DISEASE FROM LIVESTOCK

05/20. Peanut tester passes exam
05/20. Flatulence Helps Fight Disease
05/19. Scientists develop a test for mad cow disease
05/16. AMI, NCBA team up on E. Coli O157:H7 research
05/16. Roslin makes breakthrough in CJD testing
05/16. Living Test for Mad Cow Disease; Results Presented at Centen
05/16. Pressure and temperature enhance meat safety
05/16. RESEARCHERS GET TO THE ROOT OF CASSAVA’S CYANIDE-PRODUCING A

05/16. Prometic Life Sciences Selects Ligands Specifically Binding Human Prion Proteins
05/15. California raisins make safe and tasty preservative in jerky

Current USDA/FDA News
Statement on BSE Cow in Alberta, Canada
More BSE Resources

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
Positive E. coli Test Results: Updated May 21, 2003
OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated May 21, 2003
Statement by Veneman Regarding Canada¡¯s Announcement of BSE Investigation
Quarterly Enforcement Report
Use of Rapid In-Plant Screening Tests for Antibiotic Drug Residues in Mature Swine
Current Good Manufacturing Practice in Dietary Ingredients and Dietary Supplements
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated May 19, 2003
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated May 16, 2003
Use of Material From Deer and Elk in Animal Feed

OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated May 15, 2003

Current Food Recall
05/21. Fresh Express Recalls Hearts of Romaine 10oz Because of Possible Health Risk
05/21. BCN Trading Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Sulfites in Sweet Lotus Candy

05/20. Consumer Alert: State Agriculture Commissioner Issues Warning on Orecchiette Salad
05/19. GEORGE¡¯S TASTEE Frozen unbaked patties (with beef filling) may contain E. coli
05/18. Kansas Firm Recalls Beef Frankfurters Because Of Undeclared Allergen
05/16. Undeclared milk and peanut proteins in various HOUSE curry mixes
05/13. Price Chopper Has Recalled its bakery 4-pack Carrot Muffins
05/12. Undeclared milk and peanut proteins in various HOUSE curry mixes
05/12. Undeclared milk, tree nut, peanut and egg protein in D¡¯ARTAGNAN BELGIAN

SHIGELLOSIS - USA (TEXAS) (02)
May 3, 2003
A ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org
ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious
Diseases
http://www.isid.org
From: Pablo Nart Source: abc28 (Lubbock, TX, USA) 3 May 2003 [edited]
http://home.abc28.com/Global/story.asp?S=1261828
Shigellosis Outbreak Spreading Across Lubbock County
A shigellosis outbreak is spreading like wildfire across Lubbock County.
Local health officials have been on high alert since the beginning of the
year. They say the [bacterial] illness is not airborne -- but cases are
still multiplying quickly. The highly contagious disease spreads from hand
to mouth.
The number of cases has more than quadrupled over the past 4 months. In
January 2003, Lubbock County had just 51 cases. But that number jumped
dramatically beginning in March. Last month [April 2003], doctors treated
278 cases. Most of the victims are children.
Doctors say the best protection is to make sure your children wash their
hands many times during the day, especially after they've been outside.
[It takes ingestion of very few Shigella to cause infection. Thus just a
few organisms passed from one person's hand to another and then ingested
will produce infection. - Mod.DK]


NEW RIBOPRINTER?SYSTEM RELEASE FROM DUPONT QUALICON SUPPORTS DATA SECURITY
AND AUDIT TRAILS FOR 21 CFR PART 11 COMPLIANCE

May 20, 2003
Dupont Qualicon
WILMINGTON, Del. May 20, 2003 - DuPont Qualicon is pleased to announce the
latest release of software for the RiboPrinter?microbial characterization
system, which includes data security features that are important to the
pharmaceutical, biotechnical and other industries regulated by the U.S. Food
and Drug Administration.
Version 2.0 software includes four security levels that determine user
access to features, along with audit trails that track and record changes to
data. These controls allow regulated industries to use the RiboPrinter?br>system in a manner compliant with the requirements of 21 CFR Part 11 for
electronic record security.
Regulated industries also must validate that the equipment they use is
accurate, reliable, consistent and able to discern invalid or altered
records. Customers can develop their own procedures for this, or they can
purchase convenient Validation Packages from DuPont Qualicon. The main
Validation Package contains thoroughly detailed test protocols for
installation, operation and performance, along with compliance documents and
a test plan. The Validation Package Supplement includes complete
descriptions of user requirements and functional specifications.
With this release, DuPont Qualicon is also introducing the optional Remote
Client software, which allows users to analyze RiboPrinter?system data from
their desktop or other computers outside the lab.
³This new software is great news for companies that must comply with federal
requirements for electronic records,?said Kevin Huttman, president of
DuPont Qualicon. ³That¹s because using version 2.0 software with the
RiboPrinter?system makes it faster and easier than ever to ensure data
security and create detailed audit trails. Non-regulated industries will
also welcome the familiar Windows-based interface, the ever-expanding
database of RiboPrint?patterns and the networking capabilities for
file/printer sharing.?br>The RiboPrinter?system uses powerful genetic information to provide an
automated genetic snapshot, or RiboPrint?pattern, of any bacterium in less
than eight hours. RiboPrint?patterns characterize environmental isolates,
pathogens, spoilage organisms, control strains, beneficial organisms or any
bacterium that is important to the pharmaceutical, personal care and food
safety industries.
In addition to the RiboPrinter?system, DuPont Qualicon markets the
award-winning BAX?detection system, an innovative DNA-based technology for
screening food and environmental samples for pathogens or other organisms.
The BAX?detection system provides polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to
screen food and other samples for Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, Genus
Listeria and E. coli O157:H7.