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FoodHACCP Newsletter
07/27 2015 ISSUE:662

Brain Eating Amoeba Found in Louisiana Drinking Water
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/food-poisoning-watch/brain-eating-amoeba-found-in-louisiana-drinking-water/#.VbWFUREViUl
By Bill Marler (July 26, 2015)
Late Wednesday, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) confirmed the presence of the Naegleria fowleri amoeba in the St. Bernard Parish Water System at the site of a leaking sampling station. The water system, which serves 44,000 residents in St. Bernard Parish, was tested by DHH as part of the State’s new public drinking water surveillance program. DHH notified the water system and local officials Wednesday evening. The Department asked the water system to conduct a 60-day chlorine burn to ensure that any remaining amoeba in the system are eliminated. Parish President Dave Peralta confirmed that the system would conduct the burn out of an abundance of caution.
Based on current monthly chloramine residual compliance reports, the water system has met the requirements with Louisiana rules for chloramine disinfectant levels set forth by the 2013 by emergency rule and additional requirements in 2014 by the Louisiana Legislature. Five other sites on the system tested negative for the amoeba and one site did not meet the required level of disinfectant.
Tap water in St. Bernard Parish is safe for residents to drink, but the Department urges residents to avoid getting water in their noses. Naegleria fowleri is an amoeba that occurs naturally in freshwater.
As Naegleria fowleri infections are extremely rare, testing for this amoeba in public drinking water is still relatively new and evolving. Fewer than 10 deaths in the United States have been traced back to the amoeba, with three occurring in Louisiana over the last several years. The amoeba was identified in St. Bernard Parish Water System in the summer of 2013; the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed that the system no longer tested positive for the presence of the amoeba in February 2014.
DHH conducts sampling of public drinking water systems for Naegleria fowleri each summer when temperatures rise. So far, DHH has tested 12 other systems for the amoeba and still awaiting lab results for each.
Naegleria fowleri causes a disease called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is a brain infection that leads to the destruction of brain tissue. In its early stages, symptoms of PAM may be similar to bacterial meningitis.
DHH Safe Drinking Water Program staff sampled seven sites along the St. Bernard Parish Water System. Two of the seven sites tested positive for the amoeba. One positive test was at a site at the water treatment plant before the water was treated. The second positive test occurred at 948 Angela Street, which may have been contaminated by ground water due to a leak at the sampling station. Chlorine levels at the site of the positive sample did meet the 0.5 mg/l requirement. The Department will continue to consult with the water system and the CDC. The Department requested that the water system conduct a 60-day free chlorine burn in the water system. The chlorine burn will help reduce biofilm, or organic buildup, throughout the water system and will kill the amoeba. The parish has agreed to conduct this precautionary measure.
Precautionary Measures for Families:
According to the CDC, every resident can take simple steps to help reduce their risk of Naegleria fowleri infection. Individuals should focus on limiting the amount of water going up their nose. Preventative measures recommended by the CDC include the following:
•DO NOT allow water to go up your nose or sniff water into your nose when bathing, showering, washing your face, or swimming in small hard plastic/blow-up pools.
•DO NOT jump into or put your head under bathing water (bathtubs, small hard plastic/blow-up pools); walk or lower yourself in.
•DO NOT allow children to play unsupervised with hoses or sprinklers, as they may accidentally squirt water up their nose. Avoid slip-n-slides or other activities where it is difficult to prevent water going up the nose.
•DO run bath and shower taps and hoses for five minutes before use to flush out the pipes. This is most important the first time you use the tap after the water utility raises the disinfectant level.
•DO keep small hard plastic/blow-up pools clean by emptying, scrubbing and allowing them to dry after each use.
•DO use only boiled and cooled, distilled or sterile water for making sinus rinse solutions for neti pots or performing ritual ablutions.
•DO keep your swimming pool adequately disinfected before and during use. Adequate disinfection means:
Residents should continue these precautions until testing no longer confirms the presence of the amoeba in the water system. Residents will be made aware when that occurs. For further information on preventative measures, please visit the CDC website here: http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/naegleria/prevention.html.

Salmonella Outbreak Confirmed by Mohawk Council of Akwesasne
Source : https://foodpoisoningbulletin.com/2015/salmonella-outbreak-confirmed-by-mohawk-council-of-akwesasne/
By Linda Larsen (July 26, 2015)
A Salmonella outbreak at the Akwesasne on the Canadian side of the St. Regis Mohawk Reservation has been confirmed by the Mohawk Council. As of July 24, 2015, Community Health says there are two people sick with Salmonella food poisoning.
Community Health is investigating the outbreak and has contacted 50 community members and eleven who have been advised to seek medical attention and lab testing for the pathogenic bacteria. Twenty-four members have been identified. Information has been forwarded to the St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Health Unit for investigation.
If you or a family member are part of that community and are experiencing the symptoms of a Salmonella infection, please contact 613-575-2341 ext. 3220 to speak to a Community Health nurse. Those symptoms include diarrhea that may be bloody, fever, chills, headache, and/or vomiting. A nurse is monitoring lab results this weekend.
Handwashing guidelines should be followed carefully to prevent the spread of this illness. People with diarrhea should not handle food or care for children or patients. Children with diarrhea should not go to daycare.

100 sick: Spaghetti linked to Salmonella poisoning in Czech Republic
Source : http://barfblog.com/2015/07/100-sick-spaghetti-linked-to-salmonella-poisoning-in-czech-republic/
By Doug Powell (July 26, 2015)
At least 100 people in and around Plze? came down with symptoms of salmonella poisoning after eating spaghetti carbonara made by a catering company called Zrtas, according to media reports.
Some 50 people have been hospitalized and a similar number is being treated for food poisoning on an outpatient basis.
The spaghetti meals suspected of causing the illness were prepared Friday, July 24, and delivered in paper and foil cartons in and around the Plze? area. Since the shelf life is listed as five days, more of the meals still may be available.
The company linked to the outbreak made 140 meals of spaghetti with Parmesan cheese, bacon and eggs and delivered them to multiple companies and institutions. The exact ingredient at the root of the outbreak has not been determined, but salmonella is often linked to eggs.

Unions raise alarm about food safety, slam inadequate gov’t efforts
Source : http://www.todayszaman.com/business_unions-raise-alarm-about-food-safety-slam-inadequate-govt-efforts_394680.html
By TODAY'S ZAMAN (July 26, 2015)
In the wake of a recent revelation about stores across the country selling adulterated food products, unions have sounded an alarm about an unsafe food supply, emphasizing that the government's efforts to address issues related to contaminated food are insufficient and jeopardize human life.
The Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Animal Husbandry last week released a report stating that 79 product groups, mostly meat products, had been found to contain adulterated ingredients, while 16 others contained active pharmaceuticals harmful to human health. Among the products were butters containing vegetable oil, meatballs containing horse and donkey meat, chocolates containing certain substances designed to aid recovery from sexual disorders and olive oils containing cottonseed oil.
Though the ministry reportedly carried out as many as 335,000 inspections in stores across the country in the first six months of the year, unions have found its efforts lacking, as six or seven months passed before the results were released. The products remained on store shelves in the interim. Once the results of the testing were made public, many of the items found to be adulterated had been purchased, consumed and their expiration date had passed, making it too late to issue a recall or warn the public.
Günay Kaya, the deputy chairman of the Civil Servants' Trade Union (Memur-Sen) and the president of the Union of Agriculture and Forest Workers (Toç-Bir-Sen) said on Sunday that the ministry is failing to meet its goals regarding food safety, and is unable to maintain a safe food supply.
“An unsafe food supply is among the leading risks threatening countries and human life in our world. Unfortunately, some 2 million people are killed due to food and water-borne illnesses each year. ...Recently, the ministry has been working to ensure food safety and to secure human life by fighting against adulteration and imitation. Still, the efforts made have been ineffective at completely preventing them," Kaya said.
Can Demir, the head of the food commission at the Consumer Issues Association (TÜSODER) explained that revealing the brands and details of the adulterated products after they had long since been purchased and consumed is too late, pointing out that rotten or adulterated products must be seized before they are sold. Demir called for long-term surveillance by the ministry of firms that are found to be at fault, and for the public to be made more aware of the issue.
The stores implicated in the report are mostly small-sized enterprises that rely on low and middle-income consumers, who are often concerned about low prices.

 

 

 



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What you need to know about Salmonella
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/food-poisoning-information/what-you-need-to-know-about-salmonella-3/#.VbWEnBEViUl
By Patti Waller (July 25, 2015)
Salmonella is a bacterium that causes one of the most common enteric (intestinal) infections in the United States – salmonellosis.  It has long been said that, in 1885, pioneering American veterinary scientist, Daniel E. Salmon, discovered the first strain of Salmonella. Actually, Theobald Smith, research-assistant to Dr. Salmon, discovered the first strain of Salmonella–Salmonella cholerae suis. But, being the person in charge, Dr. Salmon received credit for the discovery. In any case, today the number of known strains of the bacteria totals over two thousand.
The term Salmonella refers to a group or family of bacteria that variously cause illness in humans. Salmonella serotype typhimurium and Salmonella serotype enteritidis are the most common in the United States. Salmonella javiana is the fifth most common serotype in the United States and accounted for 3.4% of Salmonella isolates reported to the CDC during 2002. According to one study:
During the 1980s, S. Enteritidis emerged as an important cause of human illness in the United States. In 1976, the incidence of S. Enteritidis was 0.55 per 100,000 population and represented only 5% of all Salmonella isolates. By 1985, this proportion reached 10%, and the rate increased to 2.4 per 100,000 population. During the same time, total Salmonella infection rates rose from 10.7 per 100,000 in 1976 to 24.3 in 1985. The highest rates of S. Enteritidis were seen in the Northeast, although rates in the western region also increased during this time.
The number of outbreaks of S. Enteritidis infection also increased during the 1980s, particularly in the northeastern United States. Laboratory subtyping of S. Enteritidis isolates from outbreaks indicated that phage types (PT) 8 and 13a were the most common phage types in the United States. Although PT4 was common in Europe, where it coincided with a large increase in S. Enteritidis infections, it was seen in the United States only among persons with a history of foreign travel.
Of the Salmonella outbreaks that occurred from 1985 through 1999, “[f]ive hundred twenty-two (62%) outbreaks of S. Enteritidis infection were associated with food prepared at commercial food establishments (restaurants, caterers, delicatessens, bakeries, cafeteria, or market).”
Symptoms of a Salmonella Infection
Salmonella infections can have a broad range of illness, from no symptoms to severe illness. The most common clinical presentation is acute gastroenteritis. Symptoms include diarrhea, and abdominal cramps, often accompanied by fever of 100°F to 102°F (38°C to 39°C). Other symptoms may include bloody diarrhea, vomiting, headache and body aches. The incubation period, or the time from ingestion of the bacteria until the symptoms start, is generally 6 to 72 hours; however, there is evidence that in some situations the incubation can be longer than 10 days. People with salmonellosis usually recover without treatment within 3 to 7 days. Nonetheless, the bacteria will continue to be present in the intestinal tract and stool for weeks after recovery of symptoms—on average, 1 month in adults and longer in children.
Typhi and Paratyphi generally cause a bacteremic illness—Salmonella found in the blood—of long duration. This illness is called enteric, typhoid, or paratyphoid fever. Symptoms start gradually, and include fever, headache, malaise, lethargy, and abdominal pain. In children, it can present as a non-specific fever. The incubation period for S. Typhi is usually 8 to 14 days, but it can range from 3 to 60 days. For S. Paratyphi infections, the incubation period is similar to that of non-typhoidal Salmonella, 1 to 10 days.
Complications of a Salmonella Infection
In approximately 5% of non-typhoidal infections, patients develop bacteremia. In a small proportion of those cases, the bacteria can cause a focal infection, where it becomes localized in a tissue and causes an abscess, arthritis, endocarditis, or other severe illness. Infants, the elderly, and immune-compromised persons are at greater risk for bacteremia or invasive disease. Additionally, infection caused by antimicrobial-resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes appears to be more likely to cause bloodstream infections.
Overall, approximately 20% of cases each year require hospitalization, 5% of cases have an invasive infection, and one-half of 1% die. Infections in infants and in people 65 years of age or older are much more likely to require hospitalization or result in death. There is some evidence that Salmonella infections increase the risk of developing digestive disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome.
Although most persons that become ill with diarrhea caused by Salmonella recover without any further problems, a small number of persons develop a complication often referred to as reactive arthritis. The terminology used to describe this type of complication has changed over time. The term “Reiter’s Syndrome” was used for many years, but has now fallen into disfavor. The precise proportion of persons that develop reactive arthritis following a Salmonella infection is unknown, with estimates ranging from 2 to 15%. Symptoms of reactive arthritis include inflammation (swelling, redness, heat, and pain) of the joints, the genitourinary tract (reproductive and urinary organs), or the eyes.
More specifically, symptoms of reactive arthritis include pain and swelling in the knees, ankles, feet and heels. It may also affect wrists, fingers, other joints, or the lower back. Tendonitis (inflammation of the tendons) or enthesitis (inflammation where tendons attach to the bone) can occur. Other symptoms may include prostatitis, cervicitis, urethritis (inflammation of the prostate gland, cervix or urethra), conjunctivitis (inflammation of the membrane lining the eyelid) or uveitis (inflammation of the inner eye). Ulcers and skin rashes are less common. Symptoms can range from mild to severe.
One study showed that on average, symptoms developed 18 days after infection. A small proportion of those persons (15%) had sought medical care for their symptoms, and two thirds of persons with reactive arthritis were still experiencing symptoms 6 months later. Although most cases recover within a few months, some continue to experience complications for years. Treatment focuses on relieving the symptoms.
There are a lot of gaps in our knowledge surrounding this complication. Since there is no specific test for reactive arthritis, doctors rely on signs and symptoms of the patient in order to make the diagnosis. However, there are no clearly defined criteria or set of symptoms used to diagnose this condition. The role of genetics is also unclear. It is thought that the presence of a gene called human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 predisposes a person to develop reactive arthritis, along with other autoimmune diseases; however, several studies have shown that many persons that develop reactive arthritis lack this genetic factor.
Diagnosis of Salmonella Infections
Salmonella bacteria can be detected in stool. In cases of bacteremia or invasive illness, the bacteria can also be detected in the blood, urine, or on rare occasions in tissues. The test consists of growing the bacteria in culture. A fecal, blood or other sample is placed in nutrient broth or on agar and incubated for 2-3 days. After that time, a trained microbiologist can identify the bacteria, if present, and confirm its identity by looking at biochemical reactions. Treatment with antibiotics before collecting a specimen for testing can affect bacterial growth in culture, and lead to a negative test result even when Salmonella causes the infection.
Treatment for Salmonella Infections
Salmonella infections usually resolve in 3 to 7 days, and many times require no treatment. Persons with severe diarrhea may require rehydration, often with intravenous fluids. Antimicrobial therapy (or treatment with antibiotics) is not recommended for uncomplicated gastroenteritis. In contrast, antibiotics are recommended for persons at increased risk of invasive disease, including infants younger than 3 months of age.
In situations in which antibiotics are needed, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, or amoxicillin, are the best choices. Ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, or flouroquinolones are effective options for antimicrobial-resistant strains, although fluoroquinolones are not approved for persons less than 18 years of age. For persons with an infection in a specific organ or tissue (invasive disease), treatment with an expanded-spectrum cephalosporin is recommended, until it is known if the bacteria is susceptible to one of the more commonly used antibiotics listed above. For these rare situations, treatment with antibiotics for 4 weeks is generally recommended. For enteric fever, including S. Typhi infections, treatment for 14 days is recommended. The specific antibiotic chosen depends on the susceptibility of the bacteria and the response to treatment.
The Incidence of Salmonella Infections
In 2009, over 40,000 cases of Salmonella (13.6 cases per 100,000 persons) were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by public health laboratories across the nation, representing a decrease of approximately 15% from the previous year, but a 4.2% increase since 1996. Overall, the incidence of Salmonella in the United States has not significantly changed since 1996.
Only a small proportion of all Salmonella infections are diagnosed and reported to health departments. It is estimated that for every reported case, there are approximately 38.6 undiagnosed infections. The CDC estimates that 1.4 million cases, 15,000 hospitalizations, and 400 deaths are caused by Salmonella infections in the U.S. every year.
Salmonella can be grouped into more than 2,400 serotypes. The two most common serotypes in the U.S. are S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis. S. Typhi, the serotype that causes typhoid fever, is uncommon in the U.S. But, globally, typhoid fever continues to be a significant problem, with an estimated 12-33 million cases occurring annually. Moreover, outbreaks in developing countries have a high death-rate, especially when caused by strains of the bacterium that are resistant to antibiotic treatment.
Salmonella are found in the intestinal tract of wild and domesticated animals and humans. Some serotypes of Salmonella, such as S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi are only found in humans. For ease of discussion, it is generally useful to group Salmonellae into two broad categories: typhoidal, which includes S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi, and non-typhoidal, which includes all other serotypes.
The Prevalence of Salmonella in Food and Elsewhere
Eating contaminated food, especially food from animal origins, causes most Salmonella infections. One study found that 87% of all confirmed cases of Salmonella were foodborne, with 10 percent from person-to-person infection and 3% caused by pets. As explained in a comprehensive report issued by the USDA’s Economic Research Service:
Salmonella contamination occurs in a wide range of animal and plant products. Poultry products and eggs are frequently contaminated with S. enteritidis, while beef products are commonly contaminated with S. typhimurium. Other food sources of Salmonella may include raw milk or other dairy products and pork. Salmonella outbreaks also have been traced to contaminated vegetables, fruits, and marijuana.
Another study went into even greater detail in explaining the prevalence of Salmonella and the sources of human infection, stating as follows:
A food item was implicated in 389 (46%) outbreaks of S. Enteritidis infection from 1985 through1999; in 86 (22%) of these, more than one food item was implicated. Of the 371 outbreaks for which information was available, 298 (80%) were egg associated. This proportion ranged from 10 (71%) of 14 in 1985 to 19 (95%) of 20 in 1997. Of outbreaks caused by a single vehicle for which information was known, 243 (83%) of 294 were egg-associated, as were 55 (71%) of 77 outbreaks in which more than one food item was implicated.
Among single foods implicated in egg-associated outbreaks, 67 (28%) of 243 were foods that contained raw eggs (e.g., homemade ice cream, Caesar salad dressing, tiramisu, egg nog). Sixty-five (27%) of the outbreaks implicated traditional egg dishes such as omelets, French toast, pancakes, and foods that use egg batter, such as crab cakes, chile rellenos, egg rolls, and Monte Cristo sandwiches. Sixty-three (26%) outbreaks implicated dishes known to contain eggs, such as lasagna, ziti, and stuffing, which would have been expected to have been fully cooked but probably did not reach temperatures sufficient to kill S. Enteritidis. Thirty-six (15%) outbreaks implicated egg dishes that were “lightly cooked” (e.g., hollandaise sauce, meringue, cream pies). The food vehicles in 12 (5%) outbreaks were reported to contain eggs but could not be classified because information on how the dishes were prepared was not provided.
Seventy-three (20%) of the 371 confirmed outbreaks for which information was provided involved vehicles that did not contain eggs. Twenty (27%) of these outbreaks were associated with poultry (chicken or turkey), 8 (11%) with beef, and 6 (8%) with foods containing shrimp (3 outbreaks), bologna (1), pork (1), and pepper loaf (1). Other implicated foods included potatoes (3), beans (3), desserts (3), salad (3), macaroni and cheese (1), cheese sauce (1), goat cheese (1), chili (1), and a pureed diet (1). In 22 (30%) of the non–egg-associated outbreaks, more than one food was implicated. In four of these outbreaks, cross-contamination with raw eggs was suspected.
In sum, food remains the most common vehicle for the spread of Salmonella, and eggs are the most common food implicated. As one authority points out, “Studies showed that the internal contents of eggs can be contaminated with [Salmonella], and this contamination has been identified as a major risk factor in the emergence of human illness.” Part of this risk stems from the variety of ways that Salmonella can contaminate an egg. For example, the FDA has documented the following:
Bacteria can be on the outside of a shell egg. That’s because the egg exits the hen’s body through the same passageway as feces is excreted. That’s why eggs are required to be washed at the processing plant. All USDA graded eggs and most large volume processors follow the washing step with a sanitizing rinse at the processing plant. It is also possible for eggs to become infected by Salmonella Enteritidis fecal contamination through the pores of the shells after they’re laid. SE also can be inside an uncracked, whole egg. Contamination of eggs may be due to bacteria within the hen’s reproductive tract before the shell forms around the yolk and white. SE doesn’t make the hen sick.
Chicken is also a major cause of Salmonella. Beginning in 1998, the publisher of Consumer Reports magazine has conducted surveys and tested chicken at retail for Salmonella and Campylobacter. Its 2009 study found 14% of broiler chickens at grocery stores to contain Salmonella. A USDA Baseline Data Collection Program report done in 1994 documented Salmonella contamination on 20.0% of broiler-chicken carcasses. However, in 2009 the same USDA data collection survey showed the prevalence of Salmonella in broiler chickens at 7.5%. Additionally, turkey carries a lower risk with a prevalence of 1.66%.
While Salmonella comes from animal feces, fruits and vegetables can become contaminated. A common source is raw sprouts, which have been the subject of at least 30 reported outbreaks of foodborne illnesses since 1996. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services cautions against consuming raw sprouts under any circumstances: “Unlike other fresh produce, seeds and beans need warm and humid conditions to sprout and grow. These conditions are also ideal for the growth of bacteria, including Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli.”
Prevention
In general, safe cooking and preparation of food can kill existing Salmonella bacteria and prevent it from spreading. Additionally, safe choices at the grocery store can greatly reduce the risk of Salmonella.
•Always wash your hands before you start preparing food.
•Cook poultry until it reaches an internal temperature of 165 ºF.
•Cook beef and pork until they reach 160ºF. High quality steaks (not needle or blade tenderized) can be safely cooked to 145ºF.
•Cook eggs until they reach 160ºF or until the yoke is solid. Pasteurized eggs are available in some grocery stores.
•Do not eat or drink foods containing raw eggs. Examples include homemade eggnog, hollandaise sauce, and undercooked French toast.
•Never drink raw (unpasteurized) milk.
•Avoid using the microwave for cooking raw foods of animal origin. Microwave-cooked foods do not reach a uniform internal temperature, resulting in undercooked areas and survival of Salmonella.
•If you are served undercooked meat, poultry, or eggs in a restaurant don’t hesitate to send your food back to the kitchen for further cooking.
•Avoid cross-contamination. That means that you should never allow foods that will not be cooked (like salads) to come into contact with raw foods of animal origin (e.g., on dirty countertops, kitchen sinks, or cutting boards). Wash hands, kitchen work surfaces, and utensils with soap and water immediately after they have been in contact with raw foods of animal origin.
•Wash hands with soap after handling reptiles, amphibians or birds, or after contact with pet feces. Infants and persons with compromised immune systems should have no direct or indirect contact with such pets.
•Reptiles, amphibians or birds, or any elements of their housing (such as water bowls) should never be allowed in the kitchen.
•Avoid eating in animal barns, and wash your hands with soap and water after visiting petting zoos or farm settings.
•Always wash your hands after going to the bathroom. The hands of an infected person who did not wash his or her hands adequately after using the bathroom may also contaminate food.
Steps for proper hand washing:
•Wet your hands with clean warm running water;
•Apply soap;
•Rub your hands making lather for 20 seconds. Make sure that you scrub your hands entirely (not just the fingertips);
•Rinse your hands under warm running water;
•If possible, turn the faucet off using a paper towel;
•Dry your hands using paper towels or an air dryer;
•Do not use an alcohol-based (waterless) sanitizer instead of washing your hands when cooking or when hands are visibly soiled. Hand sanitizers are only effective when there is no visible organic matter (like dirt, food, or other matter) on the hands.
Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.
If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Salmonella Week – Pork, Eggs, Sushi and Chicken
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/salmonella-week-pork-eggs-sushi-and-chicken/#.VbWFDhEViUl
By Bruce Clark (July 25, 2015)
Salmonella Pork:  Washington State health officials are working with state and local partners to investigate several cases and clusters of Salmonella infections that appear to be linked to eating pork. The ongoing investigation of at least 56 cases in eight counties around the state includes food served at a variety of events.
Disease investigators continue to explore several sources from farm to table, and are focused on an apparent link to pork consumption or contamination from raw pork. Salmonellosis, the illness caused by infection with Salmonella, can cause severe and even bloody diarrhea, fever, chills, abdominal discomfort, and vomiting. Serious bloodstream infections may also occur.
As of July 23, the 56 cases include residents of King (44), Snohomish (4), Mason (2), Thurston (2), Pierce (1), Grays Harbor (1), Yakima (1), and Clark (1) counties. Five of the cases were hospitalized; no deaths have been reported. All were infected with the same strain of Salmonella bacteria. The disease investigation shows a potential exposure source for several cases was whole roasted pigs, cooked and served at private events. The source of contamination remains under investigation by state and local health officials and federal partners.
Salmonella Eggs:  The Seattle Times reports that as many as 16 people were likely sickened with salmonella poisoning from raw eggs used in Father’s Day weekend brunch dishes served at Tallulah’s restaurant in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, health officials said Wednesday.
Victims in the June 21 outbreak ranged in ages from 4 to 71, officials with Public Health — Seattle & King County said. There were nine confirmed cases and seven probable cases of infection, including one person who was hospitalized.
The infections were traced to crab and ham eggs Benedict dishes, which typically include a sauce made from raw eggs. Managers at the restaurant at 550 19th Ave. E reported the problem to health officials after receiving complaints from customers. Restaurant staff have been cooperative with the environmental health and epidemiologic investigation, officials said.
An investigation of the egg supplier and distributor conducted by the Washington State Department of Agriculture revealed no violation of regulations regarding temperature control, storage or handling, officials said. The producer reported no recent positive tests for salmonella bacteria, although they don’t routinely test raw shell eggs.
Portland Salmonella:  Public Health officials continue to investigate an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness associated with attending the Open Source Bridge Conference at the Eliot Center in downtown Portland from June 23 to 26, 2015.
We have determined that Salmonella caused gastrointestinal illness among conference attendees. Laboratory tests helped investigators identify a distinct Salmonella strain (Salmonella typhimurium) in six attendees who became ill between June 26th and June 30th. In addition to these six cases, 45 other people reported having symptoms consistent with Salmonellosis. They were among more than 220 conference attendees who responded to a Health Department survey that conference organizers shared last week.
The Health Department is continuing its investigation to identify the source of the bacteria that caused the illness. There is no indication that this outbreak spread beyond people connected to the conference. We are monitoring illness in Oregon to assure this is the case.
Salmonella Sushi:  The CDC reports that as of July 20, 2015, 62 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) have been reported from 11 states. Eleven ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.  The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: Arizona (11), California (34), Illinois (1), Michigan (1), Minnesota (4), Mississippi (1), New Mexico (6), South Dakota (1), Virginia (1), Washington (1), and Wisconsin (1).
This outbreak is caused by Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) bacteria, formerly known as Salmonella Java.
The illness caused by this bacteria typically includes diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12-72 hours after an exposure. Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) does not cause paratyphoid fever, enteric fever, or typhoid fever.
Epidemiologic and laboratory findings indicate that frozen raw tuna is the likely source of the infections.
Most ill people in the outbreak reported eating sushi made with raw tuna in the week before becoming sick.
On July 21, 2015, Osamu Corporation announced two voluntary recalls of frozen yellowfin tuna from one processing plant in Indonesia.
Salmonella Chicken:  The CDC, several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) are investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken entrees produced by Barber Foods.
Seven people infected with a strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Minnesota (5), Oklahoma (1), and Wisconsin (1). Two of these ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.
On July 1, 2015, USDA-FSIS issued a public health alert due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken products.
Barber Foods issued an expanded recall of approximately 1.7 million pounds of frozen, raw stuffed chicken products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis on July 12, 2015. This recall expanded the initial Barber Foods recall of chicken Kiev on July 2, 2015. Products were sold under many different brand names, including Barber Foods, Meijer, and Sysco. Products subject to recall bear the establishment number “P-276” on the packaging. Products were shipped to retail locations nationwide and Canada. A list of recalled products is available. Photos of recalled product labels are available.
On July 13, 2015, Omaha Steaks issued a recall of stuffed chicken breast entrees that may be contaminated with Salmonella. Products were manufactured by Barber Foods and sold under the Omaha Steaks label. Products subject to recall bear the establishment number “P-4230A” on the packaging. A list of recalled products is available and includes chicken cordon bleu, chicken Kiev, and chicken with broccoli and cheese.
The CDC, the Minnesota Department of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) are investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken entrees produced by Aspen Foods.
Three people infected with a strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Minnesota. Two of these ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.
The three illnesses in Minnesota occurred after people had eaten Antioch Farms brand cordon bleu stuffed chicken breast, which is produced by Aspen Foods.
On July 1, 2015, USDA-FSIS issued a public health alert due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken products.
On July 15, 2015, Aspen Foods issued a recall of approximately 1.9 million pounds of frozen, raw, stuffed, and breaded chicken products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis. Products subject to recall bear the establishment number “P-1358” on the packaging. Products were shipped to retail stores and food service locations nationwide.

 

 

 

 


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This Could Be The Future Of Food Safety
Source : http://www.refinery29.com/2015/07/91221/fda-food-safety-challenge-salmonella
By Sarah Jacoby (July 23, 2015)
Spicy tuna roll fans may want to watch out: In an outbreak that started in May, 62 people have now gotten salmonella infections in the U.S. after eating sushi. In response, Osamu Corporation began a voluntary recall of its frozen yellowfin tuna. But, unfortunately, this is just the latest in a line of food-safety problems this year. In light of this outbreak, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) challenged researchers to find a better way to locate salmonella and other bacteria in our food — and the winners were announced this week.
As the World Health Organization called out earlier this year, food safety is a big problem — even more so in areas of the world where hunger is up and food-handling hygiene is down. The organization estimates that over 2 million deaths occur worldwide every year from contaminated food and water. So, it's clear that we need a better system.
We've already mourned the recall of our favorite hummus, ice cream, and frozen meals. And that's just the beginning. As a new study reveals, illness-causing bacteria could even be hiding in store-bought meat. But what's especially troubling, in this case, is that companies and regulators don't always test for these kinds of bacteria.
Where to even begin? Well, the FDA wants to be able to detect problems fast enough to roll out solutions before people get sick. Currently, the FDA tests for salmonella using cell cultures, which can take days to complete and get results — and can take up to two whole weeks for eggs. The FDA wants to improve on this with new techniques that can pick out bacterial contaminants quickly, cheaply, and easily at every step of food production — from farm to fork.
So, in its first Food Safety Challenge, originally proposed back in 2012, the FDA asked research groups around the country to step up and design better ways of detecting salmonella, specifically in fresh produce like tomatoes.
The winners, announced this week, managed to cut down the 24- to 48-hour waiting time to between 30 minutes and three hours. The first-place design, created by a team of researchers from Purdue University, uses small filters; the runner-up team uses portable, DNA-based technology.
Of course, all the projects are still in their early stages. But both winners successfully showed off their solutions at a demo day put on by the FDA earlier this month. So, things are looking good. We hope to find much less salmonella in our tomatoes and our tuna soon enough.

Salmonella illness outbreak appears to be linked to pork – More than 50 cases in eight Washington counties in 2015 so far
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/salmonella-illness-outbreak-appears-to-be-linked-to-pork-more-than-50-cases-in-eight-washington-counties-in-2015-so-far/#.VbWKaBEViUl
By Drew Falkenstein (July 23, 2015)
Washington State health officials are working with state and local partners to investigate several cases and clusters of Salmonella infections that appear to be linked to eating pork. The ongoing investigation of at least 56 cases in eight counties around the state includes food served at a variety of events.
Disease investigators continue to explore several sources from farm to table, and are focused on an apparent link to pork consumption or contamination from raw pork. Salmonellosis, the illness caused by infection with Salmonella, can cause severe and even bloody diarrhea, fever, chills, abdominal discomfort, and vomiting. Serious bloodstream infections may also occur.
As of July 23, the 56 cases include residents of King (44), Snohomish (4), Mason (2), Thurston (2), Pierce (1), Grays Harbor (1), Yakima (1), and Clark (1) counties. Five of the cases were hospitalized; no deaths have been reported. All were infected with the same strain of Salmonella bacteria. The disease investigation shows a potential exposure source for several cases was whole roasted pigs, cooked and served at private events. The source of contamination remains under investigation by state and local health officials and federal partners.
The outbreaks are a reminder of the importance of proper food care, handling, preparation, and cooking to prevent illness. State health officials recommend these food safety strategies broadly, and specifically advise against eating raw or undercooked pork.
Following food safety guidance can help prevent food-borne illness. Health officials warn consumers who handle and/or eat pork to cook the meat to a safe internal temperature, using a meat thermometer; whole cuts of pork should be cooked to 145 degrees. Meat thermometers should be placed in the thickest part of the meat, avoiding bone, fat, and cartilage.
All meats and fish should be cooked to a safe internal temperature, using a food thermometer; guidance can be found on the Department of Health website. Other food safety tips include washing hands thoroughly with soap and water before and after preparing food, especially raw meats. To avoid cross-contamination, don’t place cooked food on a plate that previously held raw meat of any kind.
It’s also important to sanitize cutting boards, knives, and countertops that come into contact with raw meat by using a solution of bleach water (1 teaspoon bleach per gallon of water) or antibacterial cleaner.
Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

Bird Flu Vaccine Works on Chickens, Maybe Turkeys Too
Source : http://www.foodsafetymagazine.com/news/bird-flu-vaccine-works-on-chickens-maybe-turkeys-too/
By Staff (July 23, 2015)
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack said yesterday that scientists have developed a vaccine that is 100 percent effective in protecting chickens from bird flu. The same vaccine is currently being tested in turkeys. If that proves successful, the USDA hopes to license it for widespread production. To fund this effort for nationwide distribution, the agency hopes to secure funds from the Office of Management and Budget.
Vilsack says that the development of the vaccine--which targets the H5N2 strain that has killed 48 million birds (primarily in the Midwest) since March--is just one way that future bird flu epidemics can be avoided. The virus is believed to have spread through wild bird droppings as they migrated north. The new concern is that it’ll spread again when birds begin to fly south for the winter.
Poultry producers have mixed feelings about vaccines. While turkey producers support it because turkeys are much more likely to contract viruses, egg producers and chicken farmers are not as supportive because it has proven to negatively affect trade. Ten international trade partners banned all U.S. poultry imports due to this year’s bird flu outbreak.
"There are many unanswered questions that must be addressed before any strong consideration is given to a vaccination program," says Tom Super, a spokesman for the National Chicken Council, which represents producers of 95 percent of the U.S. broilers sold. "Two concerns of several are the effectiveness of the vaccine and potential impacts on trade."
Not all regions accept poultry animals that have been vaccinated. Out of $6 billion worth of poultry and egg products exported from the U.S. each year, $5 billion of that is chicken meat. International importers of U.S. poultry products have already been encouraged not to stop trading if the vaccination programs comes to fruition.
James Summer, president of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council says that countries are likely to refuse meat because it’s difficult to determine if birds were ever infected with the bird flu virus or if they were vaccinated.
It has not yet been determined when the vaccine would be available for nationwide production, says Vilsack.

Seattle’s Capitol Hill Tallulah’s Restaurant is Salmonella Link – “Salmonella in Seattle”
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/seattles-capitol-hill-tallulahs-restaurant-is-salmonella-link/#.VbWGVBEViUl
By Patti Waller (July 22, 2015)
The Seattle Times reports that as many as 16 people were likely sickened with salmonella poisoning from raw eggs used in Father’s Day weekend brunch dishes served at Tallulah’s restaurant in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, health officials said Wednesday.
Victims in the June 21 outbreak ranged in ages from 4 to 71, officials with Public Health — Seattle & King County said. There were nine confirmed cases and seven probable cases of infection, including one person who was hospitalized.
The infections were traced to crab and ham eggs Benedict dishes, which typically include a sauce made from raw eggs. Managers at the restaurant at 550 19th Ave. E reported the problem to health officials after receiving complaints from customers. Restaurant staff have been cooperative with the environmental health and epidemiologic investigation, officials said.
An investigation of the egg supplier and distributor conducted by the Washington State Department of Agriculture revealed no violation of regulations regarding temperature control, storage or handling, officials said. The producer reported no recent positive tests for salmonella bacteria, although they don’t routinely test raw shell eggs.
Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

E. coli Outbreaks at Fairs Are Fairly Common
Source : https://foodpoisoningbulletin.com/2015/e-coli-outbreaks-at-fairs-are-fairly-common/
By Carla Gillespie (July 22, 2015)
High temperatures, lack of hand washing facilities, live animals and food are a risky mix that make E. coli outbreaks at summertime fairs pretty common. The latest example is the Red River Valley Fair in West Fargo, ND.
Three children developed E. coli infections after attending the fair. One of them was hospitalized with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening complication that develops in about 15 percent of pediatric E. coli cases.
Health officials have not yet determined the source of the contamination. Often it’s a petting zoo or animal exhibit. But a fair official told WDAZ that there was no petting zoo at the fair and that food vendors are not allowed near the animal exhibits.
Contaminated food could also have been the source.  “Local fairs often present an opportunity for food sales with sporadic and cursory oversight,” said said Elliot Olsen, an attorney with the national food safety law firm PritzkerOlsen.
E. coli bacteria live in the intestines of humans and other animals and are shed in their feces. Meat can become contaminated during slaughter and cause illness if it is undercooked.  Produce and other food can be contaminated by an ill food handler who did not adequately wash hands.

Report: Food Recalls Have Nearly Doubled Since 2002
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/07/report-food-recalls-have-nearly-doubled-since-2002/#.VbWGgxEViUl
By News Desk (July 22, 2015)
The number of U.S. food products recalled — and the costs associated with those recalls — have nearly doubled since 2002, according to a report by reinsurance company Swiss Re.
In more than half of those recalls, the process of recalling the food cost the affected company more than $10 million. Some companies lost more than $100 million in direct costs associated with the recalls.
The report stated that the increasing number of recalls can be explained by a combination of regulatory changes and the advent of an increasingly globalized food supply chain, which creates more opportunities for problems to be created and caught.
At the same time, the portion of the U.S. population which is sensitive to pathogenic contamination and allergenic ingredients in food is growing, making the prospect of selling risky food even shakier, according to the report. The country’s population as a whole is aging, while people seem to be diagnosed with food allergies at higher rates.
According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the public cost of foodborne illness was $15.6 billion in 2013, with much of that cost being caused by foods that were ultimately recalled.

U.S. Food Recalls Have Doubled Since 2002, Says Swiss Firm
Source : http://www.foodsafetymagazine.com/news/us-food-recalls-have-doubled-since-2002-says-swiss-firm/
By Staff (July 22, 2015)
A new report by Swiss Re--a wholesale provider of reinsurance, insurance and other insurance-based forms of risk transfer--declares that the number of food recalls issued in the U.S. since 2002 has nearly doubled. The report entitled “Food Safety in a Globalized World” was released earlier this month.
Why the increase?
There are more regulations in place now more than ever, and the food chain continues to become increasingly globalized.
"In a more globalised economy, ensuring the highest level of food safety is becoming an ever greater challenge for firms," says Jayne Plunkett, head of casualty reinsurance at Swiss Re. "Today, ingredients and technologies are sourced worldwide. This leads to greater complexity for food manufacturers and consumer and regulatory demands on companies are continually increasing."
While it’s always been difficult to estimate how much recalls truly cost food companies, Swiss Re’s report claims that “52 percent of all food recalls cost the affected U.S. companies more than $10 million each, and losses of more than $100 million are possible.” These numbers do not include what Swiss Re describes as “reputational damage” that can take years to recover from.
Outside the U.S., other factors play a role in food contamination. Populations are growing older. The number of people suffering from food allergies is on the rise. Regions that are affected by malnourishment have significantly more people whose bodies and poor health cannot sustain some types of food poisoning.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that the cost of hospitalized patients and lost wages in 2013 alone was $15.6 billion.

Salmonella Sushi Outbreak Update: 62 Sick in 11 States
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/salmonella-sushi-outbreak-update-62-sick-in-11-states/#.VbWLwhEViUl
By Bill Marler (July 22, 2015)
The CDC reports that as of July 20, 2015, 62 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) have been reported from 11 states. Eleven ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.  The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: Arizona (11), California (34), Illinois (1), Michigan (1), Minnesota (4), Mississippi (1), New Mexico (6), South Dakota (1), Virginia (1), Washington (1), and Wisconsin (1).
This outbreak is caused by Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) bacteria, formerly known as Salmonella Java.
The illness caused by this bacteria typically includes diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12-72 hours after an exposure. Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) does not cause paratyphoid fever, enteric fever, or typhoid fever.
Epidemiologic and laboratory findings indicate that frozen raw tuna is the likely source of the infections.
Most ill people in the outbreak reported eating sushi made with raw tuna in the week before becoming sick.
On July 21, 2015, Osamu Corporation announced two voluntary recalls of frozen yellowfin tuna from one processing plant in Indonesia. The two recalls include:
All frozen tuna (loin, saku, chunk, slice, and ground market forms) sold to restaurants and grocery stores throughout the U.S. from May 9, 2014 to July 9, 2015. Affected products can be identified by four-digit purchase order numbers 8563 through 8599 located on each product carton box.
One lot of frozen yellowfin tuna chunk meat distributed to AFC Corporation for use in sushi franchises in grocery stores throughout the U.S. from May 20, 2015 to May 26, 2015. The affected lot can be identified by lot number 68568.
Restaurants and retailers should not sell or serve any of the recalled tuna products.
Carefully check your establishment’s freezers for recalled products. Return recalled products to the distributor for a refund.
When in doubt, don’t sell or serve it.
People at higher risk for serious foodborne illness should not eat any raw fish or raw shellfish, regardless of an ongoing outbreak. These groups include:
•Children younger than 5 years
•Adults older than 65
•Pregnant women
•People with weakened immune systems.
Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.
If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Red River Valley Fairgoer Stricken With E. coli HUS
Source : https://foodpoisoningbulletin.com/2015/red-river-valley-fairgoer-stricken-with-e-coli-hus/
By Carla Gillespie (July 21, 2015)
Three children who attended the Red River Valley Fair in West Fargo, North Dakota have E. coli infections and one of them has been hospitalized with a life-threatening complication, hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).
About 15 percent of children with E. coli infections develop HUS which causes kidney failure. Children with HUS often experience problems with their central nervous systems such as seizure and stroke.
If your child was sickened with an E. coli infection or HUS after visiting the Red River Valley Fair in West Fargo, North Dakota, contact our experienced attorneys for help.
North Dakota health officials have not yet determined the source of the bacteria at the fair held July 7-12. Some possibilities include undercooked ground beef or other meats, contaminated produce or sprouts and contact with animals at petting zoos or other animal exhibits. All three children did report having contact with animals, but health officials are looking at all possible sources.
E. coli bacteria live in the intestines of humans and other animals and are shed in their feces.  “With local fairs, where oversight is infrequent at best, any food should be treated with caution.  This is especially true where children are involved.  Likewise, contact with fair animals such as cows and goats carries a risk of E. coli contamination.  These venues are rarely equipped with proper handwashing facilities and other sanitation measures,” said Elliot Olsen, an attorney with the national food safety law firm PritzkerOlsen.
A fair official told WDAZ tv that there hasn’t been a petting zoo at the fair for thee years, that barns are sprayed down after cattle or horse shows and that food vendors are not allowed near the animal exhibits.

Raw Milk Link in Tennessee Cryptosporidium Outbreak
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/raw-milk-link-in-tennessee-cryptosporidium-outbreak/#.VbWIhxEViUl
By Andy Weisbecker (July 21, 2015)
The Tennessee Department of Health is investigating multiple gastrointestinal disease reports among people who say they consumed raw milk prior to their illness. TDH has confirmed two cases of cryptosporidiosis in individuals in the Chattanooga/Hamilton County Region. Both cases of illness are associated with consumption of raw milk from a dairy cow share program. TDH is interviewing additional participants in the program to determine if other people have been sickened. In recent months, TDH has interviewed individuals about sporadic cases of Campylobacter and Shiga-toxin producing E. coli who also reported consuming raw milk from different sources.
“Consuming raw milk in the belief it’s healthier than pasteurized milk is a perilous risk that shakes off the possibility of a range of serious and occasionally fatal illnesses for the individuals and anyone they share it with,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH. “Our best choice for healthy, nutritious milk is the pasteurized kind. Even if one believes there are health benefits, an upside, is it worth gambling on the downside risk of a serious illness, especially in a child?”
Cow share programs were made legal in Tennessee in 2009, allowing wider access to raw milk. Since that time TDH has had increasing reports of disease and outbreaks linked to raw milk consumption. In 2013, nine Tennessee children became extremely sick with E. coli O157 after drinking raw milk. Five of these children required hospitalization and three developed severe, life-threatening kidney problems.
“The Department of Agriculture has a thorough dairy inspection program focused on detecting potential health risks before milk reaches the consumer,” Tennessee Department of Agriculture Commissioner Julius Johnson said. “Legal pasteurization through a licensed dairy facility is the only way to ensure that dairy products are safe to consume. Despite a producer’s best intentions, without pasteurization, bacteria exposure is a real danger.”
Harmful bacteria that can be found in unpasteurized milk from cows, goats and other mammals include Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, E. coli and Salmonella. Common symptoms of illness from drinking contaminated raw milk include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, headaches, fever and body aches. While some people sickened with these contaminants may respond to medical treatment, others may suffer irreversible organ damage or death.
“Raw milk is 150 times more likely to cause a foodborne illness than pasteurized milk and can be life-threatening to some, particularly to children. Those who consume raw milk should be aware of the serious health risks involved,” said TDH Deputy State Epidemiologist John Dunn, DVM, PhD. “While some adults may be able to tolerate bacteria found in unpasteurized milk or food products made with raw milk, children, older adults, pregnant women and those with weakened immune systems can be in great danger.
“While it is legal in Tennessee for individuals to consume raw milk from their own animals, it doesn’t change the risk to their health,” continued Dunn. “The simple fact is all raw milk contains bacteria that pasteurization would destroy. We strongly urge Tennesseans to choose pasteurized foods and beverages when purchasing and consuming dairy products.”
To eliminate risk of infection, the Tennessee Department of Health suggests consumers read the labels of all milk and cheese products to make sure they buy only those which have been pasteurized. Pasteurization kills harmful bacteria by simply heating milk for a specific amount of time. Pasteurization has been recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as one of the ten great public health achievements of the 20th century.
Since 1987, the Food and Drug Administration has prohibited distribution of raw milk across state lines for direct sales to consumers. Some people take extreme measures to obtain raw milk, even buying and consuming raw milk labeled as pet food or investing in shared ownership of a milk cow or goat.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has additional information on the risks of raw milk available online at www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/rawmilk/raw-milk-index.html.

Three Cases of E. Coli in North Dakota Possibly Linked to Fair
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/07/three-cases-of-e-coli-in-nd-possibly-linked-to-fair/#.VbWJFhEViUl
By News Desk (July 20, 2015)
http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-images-carnival-rides-games-fair-image25309294The North Dakota Department of Health is investigating a possible cluster of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infections in eastern North Dakota.
Three cases have been reported, all of whom are younger than 18 years of age, and all of whom reported attending the Red River Valley Fair in West Fargo, ND, which was held July 7-12.
One of the people sickened has been diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a severe complication of STEC infections in which red blood cells are damaged and can cause kidney damage and kidney failure.
“We are in the early stages of this investigation and are asking people who became sick with diarrhea or bloody diarrhea for more than 24 hours within ten days of attending the fair to let us know,” said Michelle Feist, a health department epidemiologist. “Although the cases reported having contact with animals while at the fair, we are looking into other possible exposures as well.”
STEC is a bacterial infection that can cause abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and bloody diarrhea. Symptoms can be severe, resulting in dehydration and electrolyte imbalances. People usually get sick within 3 to 4 days from the time of infection, but it can take as long as 10 days for symptoms to appear.
People who have symptoms of STEC should consult with their health care provider.
STEC is shed in the stool of infected animals and people. STEC infections can result from eating contaminated food, drinking contaminated water, coming into contact with animals that are carrying STEC and can be spread from person to person through inadequate hygiene.
Undercooked meats, especially ground beef, contaminated produce or sprouts, and attending petting zoos have all been implicated in STEC outbreaks in the U.S. Animals may be infected and not have symptoms but can still shed the bacteria.

 

 

 

 

 

Internet Journal of Food Safety (Operated by FoodHACCP)
[2015] Current Issues

Vol 17.25-31
Combined Effect Of Disinfectant And Phage On The Survivality Of S. Typhimurium And Its Biofilm Phenotype
Mudit Chandra, Sunita Thakur, Satish S Chougule, Deepti Narang, Gurpreet Kaur and N S Sharma

Vol 17.21-24
Quality analysis of milk and milk products collected from Jalandhar, Punjab, India
Shalini Singh, Vinay Chandel, Pranav Soni

Vol 17.10-20
Functional and Nutraceutical Bread prepared by using Aqueous Garlic Extract
H.A.R. Suleria, N. Khalid, S. Sultan, A. Raza, A. Muhammad and M. Abbas


Vol 17.6-9
Microbiological Assessment of Street Foods of Gangtok And Nainital, Popular Hill Resorts of India
Niki Kharel, Uma Palni and Jyoti Prakash Tamang


Vol 17.1-5
Assessment of the Microbial Quality of Locally Produced Meat (Beef and Pork) in Bolgatanga Municipal of Ghana
Innocent Allan Anachinaba, Frederick Adzitey and Gabriel Ayum Teye


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