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7/19, 2003
ISSUE:73

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USDA announces new food safety initiatives

by Daniel Yovich on 7/14/03 for Meatingplace.com
USDA Under Secretary Elsa Murano released a new food safety blueprint that will guide the continuing efforts to improve the safety of U.S. meat, poultry and egg products and protect public health.

Entitled, Enhancing Public Health: Strategies for the Future, the document outlines the Agriculture Department's accomplishments to date as well as challenges still to be overcome in order to further reduce the incidence of foodborne illness.

"In spite of recent positive trends in reductions in foodborne illness, we also recognize the need to intensify our efforts to reduce illnesses even further," Murano said. "This document will help guide us as we focus on risks and science based solutions to meet future challenges."

The document identifies key steps taken in the past year to further protect public health. Most recently, the Food Safety and Inspection Service announced a new rule requiring plants that produce ready-to-eat products to have effective programs in place to better control listeria. In addition to testing, plants are required to share data and other relevant information with FSIS. The rule also encourages all establishments to employ additional and more effective intervention technologies to combat this pathogen.

Murano said public input into the document will be important as FSIS works to implement several key initiatives to enhance meat and poultry safety and improve food inspection systems, including:

FSIS is working to lessen the time between the development and implementation of new technologies that will improve meat and poultry safety. To accomplish this task, the Agency is establishing a new office of technology approval review so that the process can be streamlined and focused.
FSIS will be conducting baseline studies to determine the nationwide levels of various pathogenic microorganisms in raw meat and poultry. In the past, limited baseline studies were used to establish performance standards, which are used to verify sanitary conditions at meat and poultry plants.
These new baseline studies will be conducted on a continual basis, yielding national trends and a way to judge the performance of initiatives designed to reduce the level of pathogens in meat and poultry products. The net result will be more targeted interventions and effective elimination of sources of foodborne microorganisms.
FSIS is working with the Research, Education, and Extension mission area at USDA to coordinate food safety research priorities and needs. The research agenda will include a mechanism by which research needs in food safety are prioritized. USDA held a food safety research agenda symposium in June 2003 to help initiate the development of a unified research agenda that will complement efforts by industry and academia.
FSIS will establish a risk analysis coordination team in order to better focus and plan long term risk analysis activities. FSIS also will coordinate with researchers within and outside USDA so that risk analysis is conducted more efficiently, utilizing the best science.
FSIS will retool its education and training programs so that its workforce is better prepared to implement and enforce new food safety regulations. The Agency will focus on recruiting scientifically educated employees and retooling its training and education programs for all inspectors. First, all training programs will be updated to incorporate a public health focus by melding scientific and technical principles with training on technical and regulatory approaches to inspection. Second, the delivery of training will be augmented through interactive sessions near employee work sites, as well as through on-site and regional training programs.
In consultation with livestock producers, researchers and other stakeholders, FSIS is developing a list of best management practices for animal production facilities such as feedlots to provide guidance in reducing pathogen loads before slaughter.
In addition to these ongoing efforts, a strong system of checks and balances is important to an effective food safety system, Murano said. FSIS is examining how it can best utilize its resources and authorities to further enhance its systems while providing incentives for compliance. The agency is working with interested parties to modernize and further enhance its compliance efforts.

More than half of Americans would avoid GM food if it were so labeled, according to poll

July 17, 2003
Source: http://www.seedquest.com/News/releases/2003/july/6212.htm
While a third of Americans already try to avoid buying food that has been genetically modified (GM), or treated with antibiotics or hormones, 55 percent, would avoid buying GM food if it were so labeled, according to a survey conducted by ABC News.The poll also found that 62 percent of women, who do most food shopping in the US, would avoid such food. Mandatory labeling, which the food industry opposes, is favored by 92 percent of Americans for genetically modified food and 85 percent for food from farm animals that have been fed hormones or antibiotics, it found. On the other side, 51 percent of those polled said they favor food specifically labeled not genetically modified, and 46 percent said the same for food labeled as from hormones and antibiotics. Nonetheless, concerns over the safety of GM food appear to have abated, with 46 percent believing it is unsafe compared with 52 percent in a similar poll two years ago, according to the ABC poll. Of those women polled, 54 percent believed GM food is unsafe, while 56 percent of men said the opposite. In 2001, 62 percent of women polled thought bio-engineered foods were unsafe. While at least one-third of US crops are bio-engineered, including two-thirds of all soybeans, nine in 10 adults surveyed thought that food eaten in the US is generally safe. Residents in agriculture-heavy midwestern US, known as the farm belt, have a slightly more favorable view of GM food, with 53 percent of those polled in that area saying it is safe, compared with 39 percent in the Northeast.
According to the poll, people who attended college are also more likely to say altered foods are safe. The ABC News poll was conducted by telephone in early July among a random national sample of 1,024 adults. GM food is at the center of a bitter US-EU trade rift. The US also wants to use GM food as a way to ease world hunger. Last month, a United Nations food safety committee called for stricter safety evaluations of GM food as part of more than 50 new food quality standards.

FDA contracts with IFT to review terrorism risks

Source: http://www.ift.org/news_bin/news/news_home.shtml
7/15/2003-As part of its continuing effort to ensure the safety and security of the nation's food supply, the Food and Drug Administration today announced it has contracted with the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) to conduct an in-depth review of preventive measures that food processors may take to reduce the risk for an intentional act of terrorism or contamination. As part of this contract, IFT will provide information about temperature, technology, chemical treatments, and other ways that may reduce or mitigate the risk."Safeguarding the U.S. food supply is an enormous task and one of our highest priorities, and we are committed to doing this job as efficiently as possible," said FDA Commissioner Mark B. McClellan, M.D., Ph.D. "This contract with a nationally recognized group of experts will help FDA make the nation's food supply even more secure."
The review will assess ways to prevent or reduce the risk of contamination of processed food either through natural or intentional acts and will provide information on various research needs that might be used for eliminating or reducing the risk. There are more than 57,000 food processors in the U.S. that provide processed foods to our citizens and exports to the world and over 1.2 million retail food facilities serving and/or selling foods directly to the consumer. The U.S. agricultural enterprise is a $200 billion business with over $55 billion in exports each year.
This effort will complement ongoing food security efforts, existing food security guidance, and proposed regulations. The industry guidances, published in March 2003, are not regulations and are not mandatory. Those guidances identified the kinds of preventive measures that may be taken to minimize the risk that food under their control will be subject to tampering or other malicious, criminal, or terrorist actions, and they focused on management, staff, public access (visitors), the facility and operations. For more information, see the FDA Press Release.

Snowe bill would ban some antibiotics in food

By MEREDITH GOAD, Portland Press Herald Writer
Source: http://www.pressherald.com/news/state/030717food.shtml
First hormones, now antibiotics.There's been a lot of talk in recent weeks about the use of artificial growth hormones in the dairy industry, since the announcement that Monsanto Corp. is suing Oakhurst Dairy over the way it markets its hormone-free milk. Now, another debate over food production is about to come front and center, possibly as early as next week.U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe of Maine will join Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Massachusetts, in introducing a bill to ban the use of eight antibiotics commonly used in agriculture to promote the growth of poultry and livestock. Snowe is the first Republican to endorse the measure, which is a revised version of a bill that failed last year.The National Academy of Sciences estimates that 70 percent of the antibiotics used in the United States are fed routinely to farm animals for reasons other than treating disease. Penicillin, tetracycline and bacitracin - all drugs used to fight illnesses in humans - are among the antibiotics given to pigs, cows and chickens to make them grow faster and prevent disease.But the antibiotics can lose effectiveness against germs that live in farm animals' guts. Those bacteria, organisms such as campylobacter and salmonella, are the same ones that cause food poisoning in people.There is growing concern among scientists, physicians and public health officials that the widespread use of antibiotics in agriculture is contributing to the development of "super bugs" that are resistant to any kind of treatment. Supporters of that theory say they want to prevent a medical backslide to the days when common infections were frightening and life-threatening."I think that we all have taken for granted that major infections aren't an expected part of our everyday experience, and that if one is unlucky enough to pick one up that there's going to be treatment for it," said Dr. Syd Sewall, a pediatrician in Hallowell who is former president of the Maine chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.Sewall's group, the Maine Medical Association, the Maine Public Health Association, many other local organizations and state public health officials have been urging the state's congressional delegation to take action on the antibiotics issue.The American Medical Association has come out in support of use restrictions. A study released in March by the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine called for an end to nontherapeutic use of the drugs, as did a 2002 study in the medical journal "Clinical Infectious Diseases."Some businesses, including some poultry producers, have voluntarily taken steps to reduce their antibiotic use. Last month, McDonald's announced that it has asked its meat suppliers to phase out the use of growth-promoting antibiotics by the end of 2004. It is the first fast-food chain to do so, but it probably won't be the last.Rebecca Goldburg, a senior scientist at Environmental Defense, said her organization will work with McDonald's to try to persuade other companies to adopt similar policies."Consumers, frankly, don't want food that's produced with large quantities of artificial hormones or pesticides or antibiotics and so on," Goldburg said, "and companies that can say they're doing without have an advantage in the marketplace."Goldburg will be in Portland today to participate in a public forum on the issue at the Wild Oats store on Marginal Way. The forum is sponsored by Wild Oats and the Union of Concerned Scientists.Snowe did not support Kennedy's antibiotics bill last year because it would have banned the therapeutic use of antibiotics in livestock as well as their use as growth promoters. Negotiations have been going on since October to develop an acceptable version, said Elizabeth Wenk, Snowe's spokeswoman."We want to ensure that it's based on sound science," Wenk said.Kennedy's and Snowe's bill would phase out the routine, nontherapeutic use of antibiotics in agriculture over two years."Unfortunately, decades after the discovery of penicillin and other antibiotics, diseases of bacterial origin remain a real and increasing threat to public health," Snowe said in a written statement. "Overuse of medically important antibiotics in humans and animals promotes resistance in bacteria. Infections caused by resistant bacteria cannot be treated with traditional antibiotics. If left unchecked, the problem of bacterial resistance represents an impending public health crisis." Producers think the bill is "a bad idea," said Barbara Determan, a pork producer in Iowa who has been active in the antibiotics debate."It would be a financial hardship because many of the operations have situations where putting in low-level antibiotics keeps the animals healthy and they gain faster," she said. "That's important to us, of course, but more importantly we want to make sure we have a safe product. If an animal becomes sick, then you have to treat it and sometimes end up using more antibiotic."Determan said pork producers have been searching for about four years for alternatives to reduce the use of growth-promoting drugs.No matter what restrictions are ultimately put in place, the growth of antibiotic-resistant germs may be inevitable, Sewall said."I think what we're going to end up doing is just slowing the process by restricting the use in agriculture," Sewall said. "What we want to do is make it so the age of antibiotics is prolonged as long as possible until we have some other kind of breakthrough in how we deal with infectious illnesses, which hopefully medicine and science will give us before it's too late."

Current Recall News

07/18. Duck Delivery Produce Recalls Cut Honeydew and Cut Cantaloupe Melon
07/18. LARMON PURE MAPLE SYRUP may be contaminated with lead
07/17. PRODUCT RECALL ALERT FROM CONSUMER ONLINE (New Zealand)
07/17. Bacteria forces fruit recall
07/17. Undeclared egg protein in ITALPASTA ELBOWS MACARONI
07/17. Undeclared sesame seeds in one variety of NISSAN BOWL NOODLES
07/17. Indiana Firm Recalls Duck Products Because Of Undeclared Allergen
07/11. TITUS SARDINES IN VEGETABLE OIL may become contaminated
07/11. HOMEY brand SHRIMP BALLS and SEAFOOD DUMPLING
07/11. Pinnacle Foods Corporation Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Egg White Protein
07/09. Food King Has REcalled Jelfy Grape Flavored Gummy
07/09. J. R. Simplot Has Recalled Potato patties
07/09. Hermanos Bakery Has Recalled Merenguitos
07/08. Price Chopper Recalls Bakery Items
07/04. Undeclared milk protein in HARVEST brand HONEY GARLIC SAUSAGE
07/03. Undeclared milk protein in HARVEST brand HONEY GARLIC SAUSAGE
07/03. Undeclared peanuts in SHALINI brand TIL CHIKKI
07/03. TAHINI-BASED PRODUCTS FROM TURKISH KITCHEN [New Zealand]
07/03. MERIT SELECTION brand smoked turkey breast may contain Listeria monocytogenes

Current Outbreak News
07/17. HALTON OFFICIALS RAISE E. COLI TALLY TO 84 -
07/16. PROM NIGHT E. COLI TOLL REACHES 29
07/15. Bacterial outbreak grows in Gaston County

07/14. Park well possible source of illness
07/11. TWO BOYS BECOME ILL AFTER DINNER AT BANQUET HALL; SAME PLACE
07/11. Salmonella lawsuit due
07/10. TAINTED CHICAGO-AREA CHILI'S LACKED HOT WATER
07/09. BANQUET HALL MEAL CONFIRMED AS E. COLI SOURCE
07/09. Food poisoning hits hundreds of prison inmates
07/08. HEALTH OFFICIALS SEARCH FOR SOURCE OF BACTERIA; E. COLI CAUS
07/08. More Chili's cases emerge
07/08. Restaurant's salmonella cases grow
07/08. 43 infected with salmonella from Vernon Hills outbreak

07/07. E. COLI CONNECTED TO LATEST MEAT RECALL
07/07. STUDENTS SURVIVE SCARY ILLNESS
07/06. FOOD POISONING KILLS 89, MAKES 3,643 ILL IN CHINA IN FIRST H
07/05. ONTARIO E. COLI OUTBREAK AT STUDENT BANQUET LIKELY FROM FOOD
07/03. MULTISTATE OUTBREAK OF SALMONELLA SEROTYPE TYPHIMURIUM
07/03. STUDENTS' E. COLI INFECTION MAY SPREAD; DOZENS AT PARTY FELL
07/03. 6 diners taken ill at Chili's
07/03. 16 Beggars Die from Poisoning in East China Province

USDA/FDA News
FDA to Review Ways to Reduce the Risk of Contamination Involving the Processing of Food
OPPD (Policy) What's New Page: Updated July 16, 2003
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated July 14, 2003
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated July 14, 2003
Guidance for Dairy Industry: Food Security Preventive Measures Guidance
USDA Announces Initiatives To Improve Food Safety
ARS Scientists May Bring Relief to Peanut Allergy Sufferers
NEW DATABASE HELPS CONTROL FOOD PATHOGENS
Public Meeting to Discuss Agenda Items for Codex Committee on Fish and Fishery Products
Twenty-sixth Session of the Codex Committee on Fish and Fishery Products

U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated July 8, 2003
Changes in Fees for Federal Meat Grading and Certification Services
Withdrawal of Food Additive Petitions Subsequently Converted to Food Contact Notifications
Bioterrorism Act of 2002 - Food Facility Registration
FSIS Issues Notice On The Importance For Businesses To Keep Proper Records
Federal Register Dockets: Updated June 26, 2003

FDA to Review Ways to Reduce the Risk of Contamination Involving the Processing of Food

Guidance for Dairy Industry: Food Security Preventive Measures Guidance

NEW DATABASE HELPS CONTROL FOOD PATHOGENS
July 9, 2003
USDA ?ARS
Source: http://wyndmoor.arserrc.gov/combase/
WYNDMOOR, Pa. - BThe Agricultural Research Service's Eastern Regional Research Center (ERRC), the U.K. Institute of Food Research (IFR) and the
U.K. Food Standards Agency recently announced the joint production of a combined database (ComBase) of Predictive Microbiology. The scientific field of Predictive Microbiology focuses on the development of mathematical models to predict the behavior of microbes in various environments. Underlying these models are vast quantities of laboratory data that describe microbial growth, persistence and death under diverse
environmental conditions, such as those encountered in the production, processing, and handling of food.
Although much data about microbial behavior are available in various formats, such as in the published literature, in private reports and in laboratory notebooks, they must be systematically collected and organized to
efficiently search and retrieve data for the development of predictive models. Currently containing more than 20,000 data sets, ComBase meets this challenge.
ARS, the U.S. Department of Agriculture=s chief scientific research agency, has made this research database available to the public at http://wyndmoor.arserrc.gov/combase/. Additional information about ComBase
is available from the U.K. Institute of Food Research at
http://www.ifr.ac.uk/combase/.
Background In the previous decade, two major Predictive Microbiology software packages were produced that describe bacterial responses to food environments: the
ERRC Pathogen Modeling Program (PMP) and the U.K. Food MicroModel (FMM), produced by the Institute of Food Research and the Food Standards Agency.
Although the FMM is no longer available, both software packages contained numerous microbial models used by the food industry, academia and government
regulatory agencies to manage food safety and quality issues. Underlying these models are tens of thousands of data sets describing the growth, survival and death of foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria.
By organizing these data in a unique database structure, they are now available for a variety of other purposes, including validating models, developing new models, and in bringing greater transparency to microbial
risk assessment. The data from the PMP and FMM constitute a significant portion of ComBase,
however ComBase is a dynamic database that is expanding with new data provided by scientists and research organizations, as well as with data
more--

Restaurant's salmonella cases grow

Source: http://www.washtimes.com/upi-breaking/20030704-091306-3930r.htm
ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill., July 4 (UPI) -- The number of people confirmed or suspected of salmonella poisoning from an Illinois restaurant is growing.
Lake County Health Department officials said the count escalated to 11 confirmed and 98 suspected salmonella cases from patrons of a Chili's restaurant, the Arlington Heights Daily Herald reported Friday.
Wednesday there were seven confirmed and 23 potential cases.Seven victims were hospitalized Thursday, health department spokeswoman Leslie Piotrowski said. Although salmonella infections occur from eating contaminated food, investigators are leaning toward an infected food handler's lack of handwashing after going to the washroom as the cause of the Chili's outbreak.Salmonella is a bacterial disease involving the colon and small intestine.The symptoms usually develop within 12 to 36 hours of exposure.
Chili's voluntarily closed Tuesday.
The 72 Chili's employees have been providing cotton swab cultures for the salmonella testing.

HALTON OFFICIALS RAISE E. COLI TALLY TO 84
July 16, 2003
The Spectator A9 Kamya Ramaswamy
Halton's health department has, according to this story, added 11 more students to the list of E. coli victims of a prom-night poisoning, bringing the total of those with symptoms to 84. Halton health communication officer Jamie Lamothe was quoted as saying, "Of the 250 that attended, we've contacted about 228. Eighty-four individuals are reporting some form of illness that's consistent with the bloody diarrhea, nausea and cramps that the confirmed cases had reported." Peel is investigating conditions of the hall which to date has had a clean record of inspection.

Bacterial outbreak grows in Gaston County
The Associated Press
GASTONIA, N.C.
Source: http://www.gainesvillesun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/
aston County health officials are urging parents and day-care centers to continue following guidelines issued to deter a contagious intestinal disease spread by contact with feces. The number of shigellosis cases in Gaston County is now 54 at nine centers, according to Renee Clark, a county health department nursing supervisor. The total is nearly double the confirmed cases reported last week. Only four cases were confirmed countywide last year, Clark said. The infection, caused by the shigella bacteria, includes symptoms of cramps, fever and vomiting. Anyone can get the infection, but it is more easily spread in children, the elderly or people with weak immune systems. The infection is often treated with antibiotics. County health officials have urged day-care centers, where nearly all the cases likely have originated, to follow hand-washing and sanitizing guidelines. Nurses assigned to each center also are testing children's stool samples for the bacteria. The infection is spread when a hand or other body part contaminated with the bacteria comes into contact with the mouth. It can also be spread through contaminated food or water and by contaminated bathroom surfaces. The infection also can be spread by children sharing contaminated toys.

General Food Safety News
(Title Only)

07/18. Canada to Introduce Sweeping Mad Cow Safeguards
07/18. UK: Substantial fall in level of dioxins in food - FSA survey
07/18. More than half of Americans would avoid GM food if it were s
07/18. Adding to GM crop debate
07/18. Desperate Measures
07/18. Action at AAMP
07/18. European Union eases testing of Thai chicken
07/18. Peanut Allergies Dangerous for Many
07/18. Tougher rules for Brazil nuts
07/18. It all additives up - Experts defend use, safety of food's u
07/18. Lawsuits Filed Against Meat Company
07/18. Testers Counter Irradiated Beef, Chicken Claims
07/17 EPA PROPOSES SAFER DRINKING WATER RULES
07/17 JAPAN DEFENDS PROHIBITION ON CANADIAN BEEF: 'THE JAPANESE GO
07/17 SAFE HANDLING OF FOOD IS IGNORED
07/17 BACTERIA HITS ICE CREAM VENDORS
07/16. POLICE STEP UP RESTAURANT RAIDS
07/16. Speaker offers food for thought on irradiated meat
07/16. FDA contracts with IFT to review terrorism risks
07/16. IFT Annual Meeting and Food Expo Report
07/15. Search for Solutions
07/15. USDA announces new food safety initiatives
07/15. Uncovering microbiological safety
07/15. Baseline Studies, Quick Approval Process for Food Safety
07/14. Worry Over a Carcinogen Spurs Research Blitz
07/14. Show us the mad cow plan, Japan says
07/14. Snowe bill would ban some antibiotics in food
07/14. Drug-free food
07/13. CONSUMERS UNION'S POSITION ON THE LABELING OF IRRADIATED FOO
07/13. Irradiating meat to kill bacteria slices both ways
07/12. Fully enjoy the fair with precautions against E. coli
07/11. STATEMENT OF NANCY DONLEY, PRESIDENT OF SAFE TABLES OUR PRIO
07/11. JAPAN NOTIFIES U.S. OF PLANS TO IMPOSE BEEF CURBS
07/11. Stomach Bug Rise Linked To Effluent
07/11. City Family Has Beef Over Raw Burger: Health Inspectors Visi
07/11. Authorities: Glass in Burgers Deliberate
07/11. 2003 IFT Annual Meeting + FOOD EXPO
07/11. UN panel eases irradiation guidelines
07/11. Safety checks on salt and vinegar under new regulations
07/11. Chicago welcomes IFT
07/11. FSA recommends BSE testing
07/11. Baseline Studies, Quick Approval Process for Food Safety
07/11. Pan Pharmaceuticals products mistakenly reach shelves
07/11. Allergy 'may be linked to soya milk'
07/11. Peanut allergies 'may not last'
07/11. Vaccine, charcoal may treat peanut allergy
07/11. W.House to lay out plan to ease Canada mad cow ban
07/11. Canada tightens protection against mad cow disease
07/11. FDA seeks to close Wash feed plant for mad cow breach
07/11. Greece Declares War on Bad Cheese
07/11. USDA backs down from seeking new food safety power
07/11. Why The Food Biz Is Hungry For Tech
07/11. CFIA calls for mandatory HACCP
07/11. U.N. Food Agency Adopts 50-Plus Safety, Quality Standards
07/10. NEW DATABASE HELPS CONTROL FOOD PATHOGENS
07/10. ARS SCIENTISTS MAY BRING RELIEF TO PEANUT ALLERGY SUFFERERS
07/10. AGENCY RECOMMENDS MINISTERS REPLACE OTM RULE WITH BSE TESTIN
07/10. BAHRAIN REOPENS MARKET TO IRISH BEEF
07/10. MEAT INSPECTIONS DECLINING, IMPACT OF POLICY IS CONTESTED
07/10. MCDONALD'S AT MUSEUM CLOSED AFTER INSPECTION
07/10. HABEAS CODFISH: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF U.S. FOOD
07/10. CHRIS HARRIS LOOKS AT THE POSSIBLE EFFECTS THAT THE LIFTING
07/10. BOTTLED WATER IS TWO YEARS OLD
07/10. The truth about irradiated meat
07/10. Irradiation Article Fallout Continues
07/10. Codex adopts 50 new food standards
07/10. Irradiation ruling condemned
07/10. Peanut Allergies may not be Permanent
07/10. Know what you eat: Europe resolves to label GMO foods
07/10. USDA urged to employ mad cow rapid test
07/10. Pet Food Boss Knew Customer Sold Food for Humans, Court Told
07/10. State to monitor medicine sales for heads-up on infection ou
07/09. BRAZIL/EU: High levels of aflatoxins found in Brazil nuts
07/09. CODEX ALIMENTARIUS COMMISSION ADOPTS MORE THAN 50 NEW FOOD S
07/09. CHOKING HAZARD FROM BANNED SWEETS
07/09. SAFETY OF FOOD PRODUCTS
07/09. WHY THE FOOD BIZ IS HUNGRY FOR TECH
07/09. WATER TESTING ON WHEELS: MOBILE UNITS TO HELP DELIVER SAFER
07/09. USDA'S VENEMAN TO MEET WITH JAPAN MINISTER ON THURS
07/09. UN body adopts global GM guidelines
07/09. US Action to Control Dioxin
07/09. Italy's mad cow disease cases rise to 102
07/09. Ottawa 95 Percent Certain Mad Cow Born in Canada
07/09. Consumer confidence
07/09. Business deficit -
07/09. Norway says listeria in feta import
07/08. PROBE OF BSE PREPAREDNESS
07/08. TAKING THE RISK OUT OF SHELLFISH
07/08. S.KOREA SAYS FINDS DIOXIN IN PORK FROM CHILE
07/08. MINISTRY WANTS FIRMS TO KEEP RECORDS ON FOOD FOR UP TO 3 YEA
07/08. CONSUMER REPORTS ARTICLE ON FOOD IRRADIATION
07/08. FARMER JEFF AND SAFE STRAWBERRY PRODUCTION: MODEL FARM VIRTU
07/08. US Agencies Said Ill-Prepared for Bioterror Attack
07/08. Irradiation Report Response
07/08. 'DISEASED MEAT' SOLD TO CITY VENUE
07/08. Irradiation Report Response
07/08. NFPA Encourages FDA to Develop Effective and Efficient Regu
07/08. Keeping it clean
07/08. State officials to investigate meat seller
07/08. Coloradans Urged To Check Freezers For Recalled Meat
07/08. Russia Threatens to Ban EU Poultry
07/07. New directions in biotech regulation - a commentary from the
07/07. MAD COW CRISIS OVER: BUT CANADA MAY HAVE TO COMPROMISE TO EN
07/07. AFLATOXINS : COMMISSION IMPOSES SPECIAL CONDITIONS FOR IMPOR
07/07. ARGENTINA SHUTS MCDONALD'S, BURGER KING OUTLETS
07/07. FOUR FOOD BUSINESSES SERVED CLOSURE ORDERS IN JUNE
07/06. FSA Board to consider replacement of OTM rule
07/06. EFSA meets in Berlin
07/06. AMI, Other Ag Groups Urge Reopening of Canadian/U.S. Border
07/06. Study finds no link between cooked potatoes, cancer
07/05. Indonesian Muslims can consume GMO foods: MUI
07/05. Ban on old beef may be lifted
07/05. Zenno won't reveal mislabeled foods [Japan]
07/04. Security boost after poisonings
07/04. Cyanide extortionist strikes again