Editor: D.H. Kang
Dept. FSHN
Washington State Univ.

7/25/2002
Issue 8

Sponsors

Sponsors
Q/A

 

To receive
Free Newsletter,
apply Free
Membership

Contact Us

 

For Main Site
Click here

 

 

New Sponsor

Clinical Products
Industrial Products
Company History

Recommended Sites
Internet Journal of Food Safety
Click Here

 

New Memthods for food safety

07/25. Company offers food makers a quick screen test

07/24. Fighting E coli

07/23. Homeland Defense in Idaho and the Nation is destined to be

07/18. U OF G RESEARCHERS TESTING E. COLI O157 VACCINE FOR CATTLE

Interesting Food Safety News

AMERICANS COULD BE FACING SERIOUS HEALTH RISKS FROM EVERYDAY FOODS
July 25, 2002
From a press release
LOS ANGELES -- According to a recent report by the Center for Health,
Environment, and Justice, American people are at serious risk from the daily
intake of dioxin. The exposure to this chemical comes in a manner most may
not even suspect -- it's in the food we eat.
The risk of getting cancer from exposure to dioxin is 1 in 10,000 for the
general American population and 1 in 1,000 for highly exposed members of the
population. These risks are 100 and 1,000 times higher, respectively, than
the one-in-a-million "acceptable" cancer risk. And we know that the daily
dioxin intake of Americans is already too high, exceeding federal risk
guidelines.
Dioxin is the common name for the chemical 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-
dioxin (TCDD). All American children are born with dioxin in their bodies.
The greatest impact appears to be on the growth and development of children.
Disrupted sexual development, birth defects and damage to the immune system
may result.
It has also been associated with low IQ, withdrawn and depressed behavior,
adverse effects on the ability to concentrate and focus attention and an
increase in hyperactive behavior in children.
What foods contain dioxin? Mostly meat and dairy products -- even ice
cream. An independent laboratory found unacceptable levels of dioxin in a
sample of the vanilla flavor of one of America's most popular ice cream
brands.
Dairy cows and beef cattle absorb dioxin by eating contaminated crops.
Dioxins are in the air and settle on the crops. They can enter the air from
thousands of sources, including incinerators that burn medical, municipal
and hazardous waste.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) holds the view that any
exposure, no matter how small, increases the risk of cancer. The EPA has
calculated a "virtually safe dose" (VSD) for dioxin-generally regarded as an
acceptably low exposure. The amount of dioxin in the serving of the tested
ice cream exceeded that VSD.
Studies conducted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
show that dioxins are very slow to leave the body and accumulate in our fat
tissue. In his book "Clear Body Clear Mind," best-selling author L. Ron
Hubbard shows exactly how poisons like dioxin accumulate in the fatty tissue
of the body and why this causes long-term serious health effects.
The book outlines the only program that can effectively rid the body of
substances like dioxin that are stored in the fatty tissue. There are
several elements to the program -- incremental doses of niacin assist in
releasing the toxins and aerobic exercise increases circulation to
"mobilize" the chemical residues from the body tissue. Low-heat sauna
sweats these residues out. Oil intake helps replace the fatty tissue which
is impregnated with toxic substances, and an exact regimen of vitamins and
minerals are taken to provide nutritional supplementation.
While no medical claims are made for the program, and the benefits vary
person to person, papers documenting the safety and value of the program
have been published in the journals of such organizations as the American
Public Health Association, the World Health Organization's International
Agency for Research on Cancer, the Society for Occupational and
Environmental Health and the Royal Swedish Academy of Science.
"Clear Body Clear Mind" is available in a paperback format in your local
bookstores and online. For more information on the book and program, visit
www.clearbodyclearmind.com .
While it may not always be easy to avoid dioxin in our food, it is
comforting to know that there is a safe and effective way to reduce toxic
residues that could cause serious long-term health effects.
SOURCE Bridge Publications

Food Safety and Inspection Service names new administrator
by Bryan Salvage on 7/24/02 for www.meatingplace.com

Garry L. McKee has been named administrator of the Food Safety and Inspection Service, according to Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman."Dr. McKee brings more than 30 years of public health experience to the administrator position," Veneman said. "This experience, combined with a solid record in managing public health programs and personnel, will be a tremendous asset as USDA continues to protect the public health by strengthening food safety programs."Since 1999, McKee has served as the director and cabinet secretary of the Wyoming Department of Health. His experience also includes 18 years as chief of the Oklahoma State Department of Health's public health laboratory and two years as its director of sanitary bacteriology.Since 1992, McKee has been a Lt. Commander in the U.S. Public Health Service Reserve. He also serves as a member of the National Public Health Anti-Terrorism Preparedness Task Force with the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials and has been a consultant to the Pan American Health Organization on development of laboratory training in Mexico and Guatemala.McKee received his B.S. in biology from Southwestern Oklahoma State University. He received Masters degrees in public health and environmental science and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Oklahoma, the news release added."Dr. McKee will play an important and active leadership role at USDA as we strive to improve management, efficiency, accountability and responsiveness within FSIS," said Undersecretary for Food Safety Dr. Elsa Murano.In recent months, Murano has announced several key personnel changes in FSIS to strengthen agency performance. Linda Swacina, who previously served as assistant administrator and director of the congressional and public affairs office, is now the FSIS associate administrator. Bill Smith, who served the agency in the field as assistant deputy administrator, executive director and regional director, is deputy administrator of the agency's office of field operations. Dr. Karen Hulebak, who served as the chief scientist for FSIS and most recently was the senior advisor for scientific affairs, has been named as deputy administrator of the office of public health and science. Acting FSIS Administrator Bill Hudnall will return to his former position with the Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, the department said.

ABOUT 12,000 POUNDS OF MEAT LINKED TO E. COLI BACTERIA IS RETURNED TO
CONAGRA

July 23, 2002
Knight-Ridder Tribune
Nicole Usher, The Dallas Morning News
Only about 12,000 pounds of the nearly 19 million pounds of potentially
contaminated beef have, according to this story, been returned to the meat
company in Colorado.
ConAgra, of Greeley, Colo., along with supermarkets and the U.S. Department
of Agriculture, was cited as saying it was difficult to determine the
location of any of the recalled beef. The company sells its beef to
distributors in 21 different states.
The second largest beef recall in U.S. history, announced Friday, has been
linked to 17 cases of sickness caused by E. coli bacteria.
Jim Herlihy, Conagra's spokesman, was quoted as saying, "At this point, its
difficult to tell where any of our wholesalers sell the meat and where the
meat is, but any of the meat that is returned to us will be destroyed."
Most of the beef that could be contaminated with E. coli bacteria has either
been consumed or is past its expiration date and is likely already off the
shelves, Mr. Herlihy said. The affected meat was processed between April 12
and July 11 and repackaged by distributors and supermarket chains.
Officials at the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta said three new cases
of E. coli-related illness were reported since Friday. Over all, there have
been 27 reported cases of illness linked to E. coli bacteria in contaminated
meat but none in Texas.
Wal-Mart Stores, Sam's Club, Albertson's and Kroger were cited as saying
Monday that they were still not sure if they had purchased any of the
recalled meat.
Wal-Mart and Sam's Club pulled ground-beef from their shelves Friday as a
precautionary measure.
The stores have promised refunds to customers who return meat, but
supermarket spokespeople said only a handful of customers were taking
advantage of the offer.

Foodborne OUTBREAKS COLLECTIONS
07/25. 4th girl had E. coli food poisoning
07/24. FOOD POISONING INVESTIGATED
07/24. CHILDREN, STAFF SENT HOME FROM N.S. SUMMER CAMP AFTER POSSIB
07/24. Water bug outbreak grows
07/24. Our holiday nightmare
07/24. No new reports of E. coli; outbreak considered over
07/23. CONAGRA TAINTED BEEF LINKED TO 26 ILLNESSES
07/23. OUTBREAK ON TRAIN WAS SECOND THIS MONTH: DOCTORS SAY COMMON
07/23. E. coli cases rise to 20 in Colorado
07/23. Young Woman With Ecoli Readmitted to Hospital

Food Safety Daily News
07/25. AMERICANS COULD BE FACING SERIOUS HEALTH RISKS FROM EVERYDAY FOODS
07/25. SYMPOSIUM PROPOSALS FOR NEXT ANNUAL MEETING DUE SEPTEMBER 3
07/25. 12TH WORLD CONGRESS OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
07/25. FOOD LABELLING
07/25. PACKAGING GETS THE ACRYLAMIDE ALL-CLEAR
07/25. FARM SECRETARY PLUGS AMERICAN BEEF
07/25. EU VETS BACK EU STEPS TO HALT FOOD HORMONE CRISIS
07/25. Marler demanding reform of 'failed' meat recall system
07/25. BEWARE: CHEF'S FINGERNAILS COULD BE HEALTH HAZARD
07/25. PUBLIC URGED TO HELP PAY FOR WATER SAFETY UPGRADES ON FARMS
07/25. PERSPECTIVE BY MEAT PROCESSING NORTH AMERICAN EDITION EDITOR
07/25. COMMISSION PROPOSES NEW RULES FOR CONTROLS ON FOOD OF ANIMAL
07/25. HANDLE PICNIC FOOD WITH CARE
07/25. CONSUMERS CAN TAKE FOOD SAFETY INTO THEIR OWN HANDS
07/25. USDA PLANS CRACKDOWN ON BEEF INSPECTION TOUGHER E. COLI REQU
07/25. Is Fish Harvesting Safe?
07/25. Spreading the word on dangers of food allergies
07/25. Guidelines cover safe handling of deer meat
07/25. Technology boosts food safety
07/25. Freshness, taste, convenience, durability, safety: It's real
07/25. Shameful delay in tainted meat scare
07/25. Food hygiene clampdown call
07/24. U.S. Senate Bill Would Give USDA Lab to Homeland Security
07/24. HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE; WATER DISTRIBUTORS MUST MEET HIGH STAND
07/24. WASH YOUR HANDS, OR BE READY TO USE BATHROOM ALL DAY
07/24. TRACING BAD MEAT
07/24. FOOD IRRADIATION
07/24. ALL IT TAKES IS SOME CULTURE TO STOP FOOD BUGS ATTACKING
07/24. DA©öS CONSUMER ADVISORY ON METHYL MERCURY AND FISH
07/24. FDA Studies Fish Diet, Pregnancy
07/24. RUSSIA/USA: Poultry import debate "basically settled"
07/24. Irradiation, industry promotion, competition discussed at ma
07/24. S.T.O.P. says ConAgra makes case for USDA mandatory recall p
07/24. Food Safety and Inspection Service names new administrator
07/24. Massive recall results in plea to irradiate all ground beef
07/24. Jelly, hold the peanut butter: Replacing a venerable spread
07/24. Senate subcommittee approves $15.9 million for CWD
07/24. Salmonella Code of Practice published
07/24. Chew on this: It is time for a Food Safety Agency
07/24. Tainted Beef
07/23. ABOUT 12,000 POUNDS OF MEAT LINKED TO E. COLI BACTERIA IS RETURNED
07/23. ALLERGIC REACTION: NAET IS A NON-INVASIVE TREATMENT THAT PAT
07/23. CHIEF SCIENTIST DR MARION HEALY LOOKS AT SULPHITE INTOLERANC
07/23. FOOD STANDARDS AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND LAUNCHED
07/23. FROM THE MANAGING DIRECTOR'S DESK
07/23. PARENTS OF ALLERGIC CHILDREN FAIL TO IDENTIFY LETHAL FOOD
07/23. ARE WE WILLING TO CONTINUE LIVING WITH DIRTY, DANGEROUS WATE
07/23. U.S. TROOPS CHECK FOOD FOR ANTHRAX
07/23. MICROBIAL PATHOGEN COMPUTER MODELING IN HACCP PLANS DRAFT
07/23. USDA OFFERS VOLUNTARY EQUIPMENT INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION
07/23. TOTAL RECALL
07/23. THE POLICY FALL OUT FROM THE CONAGRA RECALL
07/23. 07/23. USA: USDA, FSA withheld consumer research on irradiated food
07/23. JAPAN: BSE caused downfall of 64 companies
07/23. US Hopes End of Russia Poultry Feud Near -Official
07/23. Deadly bug in drinking water
07/23. Is It Safe to Eat Meat?
07/23. FDA to review mercury levels in seafood
07/23. EU lowers additive dosage


USDA/FDA NEWS
For full information, click on
Thinking Globally - Working Locally: A Conference on Food Safety Education: Updated July 24, 2002
September is National Food Safety Education Month!
Food Biotechnology Subcommittee of the Food Advisory Committee
Veneman Names Dr. Garry L. McKee As Administrator Of Food Safety And Inspection Service
Infant Formula Recall Regulations
Intralytix, Inc.; Filing of Food Additive Petition
Food Canning Establishment Registration, Process Filing and Recordkeeping

Recall Summary
07/25. Undeclared sulphites in GOLDEN GRAIN SUPER FOOD brand dried potatoes
07/25. Ohio Firm Has Recalled Sausage July 25
07/25. Nature's Way Has Recalled Nettle capsules July 24
07/25. Plantain Products Has Recalled Plantain and Cassava chips July 24
07/25. William's Candy Has Recalled Chocolate Covered Orange Peel July 24
07/25. Recall Update: Seoul Shik Poom Margaret brand Soft Cookies Recall is Complete July 24
07/25. Recall Update: Yoli Coconut Jelly candies Recall is Complete July 24
07/25. Recall Update: Arnie's Bakery Date Nut Cookies Recall is Complete July 24
07/25. Recall Update: Sincere Trading SWEET CANDY Recall is Complete July 24
07/25. Recall Update: International Vending Tuna Salad Sandwiches Recall is Complete July 24
07/25. Recall Update: Middle East Treasures "Nany" Coconut candy bar Recall is Complete
07/25. Ohio Firm Recalls Sausage Because Of Undeclared Allergen
07/24. Smithfield Packing Co. recalling 19,800 pounds of pork neckbones
07/24. July 23 - ALLERGY ALERT - Undeclared wheat in PITA¡¯S brand FALAFEL
07/23. Undeclared milk in CAMPBELL¡¯S brand HEARTY NOODLES, THAI FLAVOUR

Food Safety Poll

What is the most important foodborne pathogens?

 

 

 


Contact us Click here
Sponsorship Click here
New Membership Application (FREE) Click here

Copyright 2000-2002. (C)FoodHACCP.com
All rights reserved.