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9/15, 2003
ISSUE:82

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ASI Food Safety Consultants

Click Logo to Visit Food Safety Summit

Video News Release:USDA Celebrates National Food Safety Education Month

FDA Issues Advisory on Star Anise "Teas"

Imaging System Detects Contaminants on Poultry


TRACEBACK INVESTIGATION GUIDELINES FOR FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
September 10, 2003
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/toce.shtml
To view the document see:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/plaveg/fresh/traretinvenqe.shtml

ASSURING FOOD SAFETY AND QUALITY: GUIDELINES FOR STRENGTHENING NATIONAL FOOD CONTROL SYSTEMS
September 10, 2003
WHO Food Safety News No 7
http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/newsletter/7/en/
This publication was prepared to enable national authorities, particularly
in developing countries, to improve their food control systems. These
Guidelines replace the earlier FAO/WHO publication Guidelines for Developing
an Effective National Food Control System (1976).
Full text is available at:
http://www.who.int//foodsafety/publications/fs_management/guidelines


Current Food Safety Informaiton
09/12. INSECTS FOUND IN BOTTLED WATER IN INDIA, OFFICIALS CLOSE PLA
09/12. GROUP URGES U.S. TO END NUCLEAR-IRRADIATION OF FOOD AT BUCKS
09/12. AGENCY ISSUES FURTHER CHILLI PRODUCT WARNINGS
09/12. INSPECTION CUTBACKS COST MORE IN LONG RUN
09/12. EVES EMBROILED IN MORE MEAT-INSPECTION WOES

09/11. FDA Issues Advisory on Star Anise "Teas"
09/11. NEW WEB ADDRESSES FOR ENGLAND AND WALES' COMMUNICABLE
09/11. TRACEBACK INVESTIGATION GUIDELINES FOR FRESH FRUITS AND VEGE
09/11. TORIES FAILED TO ACT ON TAINTED MEAT WARNING; MINISTRY OFFIC
09/11. ASSURING FOOD SAFETY AND QUALITY: GUIDELINES FOR STRENGTHENI
09/11. Got Raw Milk? Not Unless You Own Your Own Cow
09/11. FOOD ALLERGY RESEARCH REVEALED AT WAO CONGRESS BRINGS NEW IN
09/11. INTERNATIONAL FOOD SAFETY ISSUES
09/11. SAFETY OF FOOD PRODUCTS
09/11. WITH CONSUMERS, FOOD SAFETY PERCEPTION IS REALITY
09/11. BIOSOLIDS WASTEWATER SEWAGE PATHOGENS SAFETY
09/11. Food Safety for Your Family
09/11. WORLD: Cartagena Protocol on GMOs enters into force
09/11. FDA links herbal tea to seizures
09/11. Don¡¯t Get Burned
09/11. Ontario's fines for tainted meat 'not a deterrent'
09/11. Japan schools still avoiding beef in meals due to mad cow fe
09/11. The legacy of 9/11
09/11. Ban on dietary supplements containing Ephedra close to becom
09/11. EU invests in safer food
09/11. Scientist okays irradiation
09/11. [Japan] Schools remain wary of serving beef dishes
09/11. CORRECTED - Excel to lease eMerge meat inspection systems
09/11. Basement butcher may face charges for incident with Carl Mon
09/11. State proposes changes to food safety program

09/10. Former Miss America Helps USDA Promote Food Safety
09/10. KEEPING HANDS CLEAN
09/10. FSAI LAUNCHES TRAINING GUIDE FOR MANAGERS: MANAGEMENT TRAINI
09/10. TAINTED MEAT FINES 'TOO LOW'; PROVINCE'S TOP PENALTY $5,000
09/10. Juice HACCP regulation questions & answers
09/10. Canadian audit: Industry standards have slipped
09/10. SureBeam closes California plant
09/10. One step closer to E. coli control
09/10. Meat packer in the clear
09/10. UK removes maize over contamination fears
09/10. No irradiated food for kids, LAUSD says -
09/10. Governments can ban genetically modified food
09/10. Focus on farm security: 60th annual farm safety and health w
09/10. New rules to govern food supplements -
09/10. HIPAC on cusp of acquiring HACCP food safety certification
09/10. Is our food safe?
09/10. [Malaysia] Jail for unhygienic food handlers
09/10. [Bahrain] Hidden risks in food

09/09. CIFIR-JIFSAN SYMPOSIUM
09/09. CRIFS SYMPOSIUM 2003: "IMPROVING FOOD SAFETY THROUGH RESEARC
09/09. COMMUNICATING CANADIAN SUPPLY CHAIN FOOD SAFETY INITIATIVES:
09/09. SECOND STATEMENT FROM AYLMER MEAT PACKERS INC.
09/09. SAFETY OF FOOD PRODUCTS
09/09. REPEATED CHALLENGE WITH PRION DISEASE: THE RISK OF INFECTION
09/09. Winning the bacteria battle
09/09. FOODNET SURVEILLANCE REPORT FOR 2001
09/09. IS OUR FOOD SAFE NOW?
09/09. SLAUGHTER INDUSTRY STANDARDS SLIP AUDIT; CANADA IS FALLING B
09/09. INSPECTORS WANT SICK CATTLE KEPT OUT OF FOOD CHAIN: IF AN AN
09/09. MEAT SCANDAL IS A DIRECT RESULT OF HARRIS-EVES CUTBACKS
09/09. MEAT POSES 'MINIMAL RISK'; NO E. COLI IN SEIZED AYLMER PRODU
09/09. Korea arrests three for selling Canadian beef
09/09. Bacteria May Play Role In Preventing Food Allergies
09/09. One 5-year-old's allergy leads to class peanut ban
09/09. BSE test could avoid slaughters
09/09. 49 states to test deer and elk for chronic wasting disease
09/09. REDUCE THE INCIDENCE OF ALLERGY AMONG AT RISK INFANTS:
09/09. SPANISH LISTERIA VIDEO AND BOOKLET AVAILABLE
09/09. EU governments can ban GM food
09/09. Cepheid Sells Pathogen Detection Systems to FDA
09/09. Aylmer Meats not harmful: Safety commissioner
09/09. India: Land of Adulterated food/Drinks and Spurious Drugs
09/09. Public panels concerned by GM
09/09. Handling Your Food Safely
09/09. [India] Human faeces, arsenic found in Kolkata's drinking wa
09/09. Gene find could halt bug peril


JOB Information
9/12 HACCP and Food Safety Director
9/11 QUALITY CONTROL MANAGER -
9/10 Director of R&D
9/10 Senior Food Technologist
9/10 R & D Scientist (Breaded Food)
9/10 Quality Assurance Manager
9/10 Quality Assurance Manager (Coner Bakery) -
9/09 INTERNATIONAL PRODUCT DIRECTOR (Papa John's International)
9/09 R&D Director - Thermal Processed Foods
9/09 Food Scientist

Food Safety for Your Family
Tue Sep 9, 8:00 PM ET
KidsHealth.org
In Yahoo! Health
http://story.news.yahoo.com/
You probably have lots of concerns about the foods you give to your child. Is it a nutritious meal? Will he eat it? Is there too much fat? But one thing that may not cross your mind as you're slicing and dicing in the kitchen is food safety.Why is food safety important? And how can you be sure your kitchen and the foods you prepare in it are safe? Keep reading to find out.
Why Food Safety Is Important
Proper food preparations are necessary to prevent the spread of bacteria, such as E. coli, and foodborne illnesses, such as salmonellosis, campylobacter infections , and listeriosis. These preparations include knowing how to select foods in the grocery store, how to store them in your kitchen, and how to clean your kitchen.
In the Grocery Store
The grocery store is your first stop on the way to food safety. To ensure the freshness of your refrigerated items (meat, dairy, eggs, and fish, for example), put these in your cart last. If your drive home is longer than 1 hour, you might want to consider putting these items in a cooler to keep them fresh.
When purchasing packaged meat, poultry, or fish, be sure to check the expiration date on the label. Even if the expiration date is still acceptable, don't buy fish or meats that have any unusual odors or look strange. Ground beef should be red, not any shade of brown; a whole fish is fresh when its eyes are clear, not milky. In the refrigerator, put meat, poultry, and fish in separate plastic bags so that their juices do not get on your other foods. It's also important to check inside egg cartons. You should make sure the eggs, which should be grade A or AA, are clean and free from cracks.

Don't buy:
fruit with broken skin (bacteria can enter through the opening in the skin and contaminate the fruit)
unpasteurized ciders or juices (they can contain harmful bacteria)
prestuffed turkeys or chickens

In the Kitchen
Before you put the groceries away, check the temperature of your refrigerator and freezer. Your refrigerator should be set for 40 degrees Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius), and your freezer should be set to 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-18 degrees Celsius) or lower. These chilly temperatures will help keep any bacteria in your foods from multiplying.


The first items you should put away are those that belong in the refrigerator and freezer. Keep eggs in the original carton on a shelf in your refrigerator (most refrigerator doors do not keep eggs cold enough).


Raw meat, poultry, or fish should be cooked or frozen within 2 days. Raw ground meats can be stored in the freezer for a maximum of 4 months; cooked meats can be frozen for a maximum of 3 months.


It's important to refrigerate any leftovers as soon as possible after cooking. If left to sit at room temperature, bacteria in the food will multiply quickly. To facilitate the cooling process, you might want to divide the leftovers into smaller containers. Also, remove stuffing from poultry after cooking and store separately in the refrigerator. Consume leftovers within 3 to 5 days or throw them out.


Follow these handling and cooking guidelines to prevent foodborne illness in your family:

thaw meat, poultry, and fish in the refrigerator or microwave, never at room temperature
cook thawed meat, poultry, and fish immediately
throw away any leftover uncooked meat, poultry, or fish marinades
cook meat until the center is no longer pink and the juices run clear
cook crumbled ground beef or poultry until it's no longer pink
use a meat thermometer to tell whether meats are cooked thoroughly - most thermometers indicate at which temperature the type of meat is safely cooked, or you can refer to the recommendations below (place thermometer in the thickest portion of the meat and away from bones or fat)
scrub all fruits and vegetables with plain water to remove any pesticide residue or dirt
remove the outer leaves of leafy greens, such as spinach or lettuce

Scientist okays irradiation
Food Production Daily
http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/news/news.asp?id=3423
11/09/03 - A US molecular biologist has claimed that serving up irradiated beef is a far safer option than serving it up under cooked.
Food irradiation is rarely out of the headlines in the US these days, as irradiated meat is about to be introduced as part of the national school lunch programme as early as next year.
Speaking yesterday at the IMRP 2003 Conference in Chicago, the scientist and expert on food irradiation claimed there is a greater safety risk of eating non-irradiated hamburgers cooked well done than in eating irradiated burgers cooked medium or even rare. "It's not the meat, it's the heat," said Morton Satin, author of Food Irradiation: A Guidebook, who spent 16 years with the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations.

"The principal function of food irradiation in food safety is to minimise the risk of pathogens," said Satin. "In this cold process, authoritative scientific studies have made it clear that no new hazards are introduced. But cooking meat well done to an internal temperature of 160 degrees - the most common method for reducing foodborne hazards- introduces a whole range of new problems whose significance is just becoming known."

Based on data from the National Cancer Institute, MIT, Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and other institutions, cooking foods to a well-done state increases the amounts of heterocyclic products produced and consumed in the diet. "This increases the risk of a range of conditions including colorectal adenomas, adenocarcinoma of the stomach and esophagus and breast, lung and prostate cancer," Satin said. "Parents, dieticians, nutritionists and administrators are pouring their hearts into the irradiated ground beef debate without the benefit of all the facts," Satin believes. "If they had all the facts and understood the negative effects of high-temperature, well-done cooking, they would consider the matter differently. In all likelihood, they would regard food irradiation to be a godsend for school lunch food safety."

Satin is recommending a broad-based review on the relative risks of consuming irradiated foods cooked medium or even rare versus the risk of eating unirradiated foods that are cooked well-done, where they lose most of their flavour and texture.

"If we conclude that using heat as a primary process to reduce the risk of pathogens poses a greater risk to consumers than the use of irradiation for the same purpose, then we must consider irradiation mandatory for certain classes of high risk foods. We will not only have safer foods, but they will taste a hell of a lot better."

The many opponents to food irradiation, in both the US and Europe, will undoubtedly closely mark Satin words. Currently the US advocacy group Public Citizen is mounting a major campaign against the use of food irradiation for school lunch programme, citing a lack of scientific evidence to prove its safety.


AN OUTBREAK OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM PHAGE TYPE 99 LINKED TO CONTAMINATED
BAKERY PIPING BAGS


September 2003
Communicable Diseases Intelligence - Vol 27 No 3 Ingrid G Tribe,1 Sharon Hart,1 David Ferrall,2 Rod Givney1
http://www.cda.gov.au/
In October 2002, the Communicable Disease Control Branch investigated an outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 99. Cases (13 male, 9 female, age range: 2 to 83 years) were residents of metropolitan Adelaide. Of these, 20 cases were available for interview. Hypothesis generating interviews sought demographic, illness, food purchasing practices, food consumption, social activities and animal contact information for the 7-day period prior to the onset of symptoms. Seven cases were hospitalised, and one case died.
There were two secondary cases. Hypothesis generating interviews identified three distinct groupings. The first consisted of six community cases reporting consumption of sweet bakery
items. Of these, five had eaten cream-filled buns or cakes. These items were all traced back to the point of manufacture identified as bakery A. The second grouping consisted of six cases that had attended a self-catered
birthday party. A cohort study was initiated using a telephone administered structured questionnaire. In total, 53 (93%) of 57 party attendees were interviewed. Of these, 22 (42%) experienced an onset of gastrointestinal
illness within three days of attending the party. Of the ill party attendees, 15 (68%) reported fever, 20 (91%) abdominal pain, 20 (91%)
diarrhoea, 3 (14%) bloody diarrhoea, 13 (59%) nausea and 8 (36%) vomiting.
Three party attendees reported gastrointestinal illness prior to attending
the party, however, none were involved in subsequent food preparation or
food handling practices.
The analytical study revealed males were 8 (RR=8.48, 95%CI 2.19-32.84) times
more likely to have experienced illness after attending the party.
Univariate analyses identified pork (RR=2.41, 95%CI 1.11-5.24) and cream
puffs (RR=3.73, 95%CI 2.11-6.59) as statistically significant risk factors
for illness. Thirteen assorted desserts from a variety of sources were
served at the party. Of these, 10 dozen small individual cakes had been
purchased the previous day from a local bakery. After purchase, the cakes
were stored un-refrigerated until required the following evening. Included
in the purchase, was a selection of cream filled cakes. The risk ratio for
small individual cream-filled cakes was 3.02 (95%CI 1.39-6.57). These cakes
were traced back to the point of manufacture, bakery A.The third grouping consisted of four cases that reported no apparent links
to the consumption of sweet bakery products.
An environmental investigation was conducted. There were two reports of gastrointestinal illness in bakery employees. Both employees reported involvement in the production of cream filled bakery products. Moreover, both employees reported eating sweet bakery items produced by bakery A. Stool specimens provided by both employees yielded Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 99. In total, 111 environmental swabs and food samples were collected from bakery A. Of these, a composite sample of six piping bags yielded Salmonella
Typhimurium phage type 99. Initially, unrecognised cross-contamination of
piping bags from staff, ingredients or environmental sources was considered.
Of particular importance, the environmental investigation focussed on inadequate procedures for cleaning and sanitising piping bags. Subsequent questioning of staff directly involved in food production procedures
identified that non-disposable piping bags were being used to pipe both raw meat for sausage rolls and cream for sweet bakery items.
The epidemiological and microbiological investigations identified an association between human infection with Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 99 and the consumption of bakery items from bakery A. This outbreak illustrates the dangers of using non-disposable piping bags for multiple purposes. To minimise cross-contamination, separate piping bags
for raw meat and cream processes were introduced. In addition, correct
procedures for cleaning and sanitising non-disposable piping bags were
instituted. A Food Industry Bulletin highlighting correct procedures for
maintaining piping bags was issued.
Clearly, temperature abuse of cream products by some customers may have
increased the likelihood of human illness. Nonetheless, Salmonellae are an
undesirable contaminant in any commercial food product that is sold
ready-to-eat. Procedures should be in place in all commercial bakeries to
minimise the risk of infection to members of the public.

UDSA/FDA News
FDA Issues Advisory on Star Anise "Teas"
Imaging System Detects Contaminants on Poultry
Former Miss America Helps USDA Promote Food Safety
Video News Release: USDA Celebrates National Food Safety Education Month
U.S. Codex Office "What's New" Page: Updated September 9, 2003
Reminder: Listeria Workshops Begin September 13
Food Biotechnology Subcommittee of the Food Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting
Guidance for Industry on Part 11, Electronic Records; Electronic Signatures
2001 Food Code Supplement
2001 Food Code Errata Sheet

Current Foodborne Outbreaks
09/12. CONTAMINATED FOOD HAS LED TO PROBLEMS
09/12. 222 STUDENTS POISONED AT CHINESE MILITARY BASE

09/11. BRUCELLOSIS - THAILAND (RATCHABURI)
09/11. AN OUTBREAK OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM PHAGE TYPE 99 LINKED T
09/11. EIGHTH CASE OF E. COLI REPORTED IN WESTERN NEW BRUNSWICK ARE
09/11. Lawrence Cryptosporidiosis Outbreak Update
09/11. Kennesaw restaurant closed for salmonella
09/10. CRYPTOSPORIDIOSIS, SWIMMING POOLS - USA (KANSAS) (03)
09/10. A SEVENTH CASE OF E. COLI REPORTED IN WOODSTOCK, N.B., AREA
09/10. Health officials investigate salmonella outbreak linked to r
09/10. Willamette Univ. students sickened by tuna tacos
09/10. Virus blamed for sick students at Upstate schools

Current Recall Information
09/12. Undeclared peanut protein in NAMJAI and COCK BRANDS CURRY PASTE
09/12. Massachusetts Firm Recalls Meat And Poultry Products For Possible Listeria
09/11. California Firm Recalls Luncheon Meat For Possible Listeria Contamination
09/08. Update - Minister orders recall of AYLMER MEAT PACKERS INC. beef
09/07. Mandalay Trading Corporation Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Sulfites in Products
09/06. Illinois Firm Recalls Chili For Mislabeling

Lawrence Cryptosporidiosis Outbreak Update

source from:http://www.kctv5.com/
LAWRENCE, Kan. -- More than 70 people in Lawrence have now gotten sick from the parasite cryptosporidium.
Two thirds of those are children.
Health officials still have no idea where it's coming from. It spreads in water, but health officials have eliminated both the water supply and local pools as the source.
The Centers for Disease Control is conducting a more in-depth study, but that could take months.That's why they are urging all residents to take lots of precautions. The Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department issued a news release Tuesday. In it, they said they were providing residents with the following information.High risk individuals include immunosuppressed persons, such as those undergoing cancer treatment or with HIV/AIDS; organ transplant recipients and those receiving steroid treatment. People with cryptosporidium should avoid close contact with high risk individuals. If people with weakened immune systems become infected, cryptosporidium can be a life-threatening disease, according to the Health Department news release.
Children and pregnant women should drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration from the diarrhea caused by cryptosporidium.
Residents should wash hands regularly, especially after using the bathroom and before preparing food. Wash hands after changing diapers. Wash hands and clean surfaces if caring for someone with diarrhea, especially diaper or toddler-aged children.
Children with diarrhea should not be dropped off at daycares. Daycare employees with diarrhea should be excluded from work. Daycare workers should wash hands after every diaper change, even if they wear gloves. Refrain from using swimming pools, water tables and do other water-based activities at daycares while the outbreak is going on. Work with children so they wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the toilet and before handling or eating food.
Swimmers shouldn't swim when ill with diarrhea or for two weeks after the end of diarrhea. Cryptosporidium is chlorine resistant. Do not swallow pool, lake or river water. Shower before swimming and practice good pool hygiene.
Avoid drinking untreated water from shallow wells, lakes, rivers, springs, ponds and streams.
In restaurants, employees should wash hands after using the bathroom and before preparing food. Employees with diarrhea should be excluded from food preparation activities.

Carcass rinse gains approval
MeatProcess.com
http://www.meatprocess.com/news/news.asp?id=575
10/09/03 - The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has granted approval for a proprietary formulation of lactoferrin. The ruling paves the way for the commercial application of this new food safety technology.

Activated Lactoferrin, as it is called, will be used as a carcass rinse during processing to further protect beef from harmful bacteria. This all-natural food safety technology will be marketed as Activin by aLF Ventures, a joint venture between Farmland National Beef and DMV International.
The Activin system includes application of Activated Lactoferrin, a milk derived protein fraction that has been activated to work the same way on the meat surface that mammalian milk works to protect infants from harmful bacteria. Activated Lactoferrin protects beef against E.coli O157:H7 and more than 30 different types of pathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella and Campylobacter.

It also prevents pathogenic bacteria from attaching to meat surfaces and can also be used to inhibit the growth of bacteria. The Activin system is expected to be in use at Farmland National beef plants later this summer.

This is an important milestone for DMV International,?said Xander Wessels, managing director of DMV International. We entered into a joint venture to facilitate development and marketing of the Activin system."

Farmland National Beef Packing Company is the US largest beef packing company that is fully owned by producers. Farmland National Beef, the fourth-largest beef packing company in the US with annual sales of over $3 billion, processes and markets fresh beef products for domestic and international markets.

DMV International is one of the largest producers and marketers of lactoferrin worldwide and has developed extensive patented production technology for lactoferrin. DMV International is part of the Netherlands- based international dairy company, Campina, with an annual turnover of €3.9 billion.