9/19
2003


ISSUE:
83
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Food Security Seminar
http://www.nfpa-food.org/
NFPA will hold a one-day seminar on October 30 in Arlington, Virginia, titled "Food Security: Identifying Your Goals."
Click on the link below
(http://www.nfpa-food.org/documents/FoodSecuritySeminar.pdf)
to open the file containing details.

TRACEBACK INVESTIGATION GUIDELINES FOR FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
September 10, 2003
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/toce.shtml
To view the document see:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/plaveg/fresh/traretinvenqe.shtml

USDA: Testing cuts E. coli woes
source from: Denver Post Washington Bureau
By Anne C. Mulkern
http://www.denverpost.com/
WASHINGTON - Recalls of contaminated meat and tests indicating beef is contaminated have dropped since the USDA imposed new policies following a massive outbreak of illnesses last summer that were tied to beef from a Greeley slaughterhouse.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Wednesday that its initiatives are working to reduce the incidence of meat contaminated with E. coli. But watchdog groups said it's not clear whether the statistical dips are sustainable or whether the drops are because of the USDA's programs.

"I think that after last summer's events, USDA knew that they couldn't have another summer like that, and to their credit, they haven't," said Carol Tucker Foreman, director of the Food Policy Institute at the Consumer Federation of America. "But they can't claim all the credit, either."
In the summer of 2002, 18.6 million pounds of ground beef from the then-ConAgra plant in Greeley was recalled. The contaminated beef has been linked to 46 illnesses and one death.After the outbreak, the USDA eliminated a program that let some large slaughterhouses escape random testing for contaminates. Plants were required to review their plans for hazard reduction, and inspectors compared what was in the plans to what was actually happening at the plant.From January through Aug. 31, there have been 45 meat recalls, compared with 76 during the same period last year, said Elsa Murano, undersecretary for food safety at the USDA.The USDA tested about 7,000 samples of meat from January through August and found E. coli contamination in 0.32 percent, compared with 0.78 percent in the same period in 2002, and 0.84 percent in the first eight months of 2001. She said the tests are being done exactly the same way.However, the incidence of E. coli-related illnesses is not dropping significantly, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.Murano said the CDC does not specify how a person got E. coli, and that E. coli has been found on lettuce and other produce. But she said that while that's true, the E. coli all comes from the same original source: a cow's intestines.Foreman said the numbers may be dropping because more slaughterhouses are enacting a policy of holding on to beef for up to four days until they know the results of E. coli tests.

UDSA/FDA News
Food Safety in a Disaster
FDA Offers Food Safety Information for Expected Power Outages and Flooding
USDA CONSUMER ALERT Keeping Food Safe During An Emergency
FSIS Sampling For Ground Beef Shows E. coli O157:H7 Downward Trend
Positive E. coli Test Results: Updated September 17, 2003
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)
Disaster Investigations
Comment Request; Threshold of Regulation for Substances Used in Food-Contact Articles
Guidance for Industry on Use of Material From Deer and Elk in Animal Feed
Preparing a Claim . . . for Submission to the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition
FDA Warns Milk Producers to Remove "Hormone Free" Claims From the Labeling of Dairy
Keeping Food Safe During An Emergency
Como Mantener los Alimentos Sanos Durante una Emergencia
Surveillance of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
FSIS Constituent Update/Alert: Updated September 12, 2003
Food Safety Publications

Food Safety (WHO)

source from: World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/foodsafety/en/
The Food Safety Department (FOS) strives to reduce the serious negative impact of foodborne disease worldwide.

Food and waterborne diarrhoeal diseases are leading causes of illness and death in less developed countries, killing approximately 2.2 million people annually, most of whom are children. Recent trends in global food production, processing, distribution and preparation are creating an increasing demand for food safety research in order ensure a safer global food supply. WHO works with FAO and other WHO departments to address food safety issues along the entire food production chain--from production to consumption--using new methods of risk analysis. These methods provide efficient, science-based tools to improve food safety, thereby benefiting both public health and economic development. FOS endeavours to help WHO's 192 Member States through the approaches outlined in the WHO Global Strategy for Food Safety.

FDA warns milk producers on "Hormone Free" claims

source from:IFT Daily News
http://www.ift.org/news_bin/news/news_home.shtml
9/17/2003-On Sept. 16, The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued Warning Letters to four manufacturers of whole milk, reduced fat milk and ice cream, informing them that their products are misbranded because the labels contain the false statements, "No Hormones" or "Hormone Free." "FDA is committed to assuring that consumers are provided with truthful information on product labels," said FDA Commissioner Mark McClellan, MD., Ph.D.. "FDA will continue to take strong action to protect American consumers from products with labeling that is false or misleading." During recent inspections, FDA investigators collected labels of dairy products, including various milk and ice cream products. FDA reviewed the labels and determined that the statements "No Hormones" and "Hormone Free" are false claims, and therefore, the products are misbranded under section 403(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Under section 403(a) of the Act, a product is misbranded if any information presented on the label or labeling is false or misleading. The Warning Letters explain that "No Hormones" and "Hormone Free" are false claims because all milk contains naturally occurring hormones, and milk can not be processed in a manner that renders it free of hormones. For more information, see the FDA Press Release.

Americans are iffy on genetically modified foods
source from http://www.usatoday.com/
By Elizabeth Weise, USA TODAY
Americans still don't know much about genetically modified foods, even though increasing amounts of their food comes from biotech corn and soybeans, according to a poll released today by the non-partisan Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology.
Support for the introduction of GM foods into the food supply is divided: One-quarter of Americans are in favor and almost half are opposed. But opposition is softening, to 48% from 58% two years ago, when Pew first polled consumers.
Opinions about the safety of GM food haven't budged much. Just above one-quarter of Americans, 27%, say the foods are basically safe, and exactly one-quarter say they're basically unsafe.
This is where knowledge comes in. Just 24% of Americans say they've eaten GM foods, and 58% say they haven't. But the Grocery Manufactures of America says 70% to 80% of processed foods sold in supermarkets contain products made from genetically engineered corn, soybeans or cottonseed oil.
That includes most products sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, which is almost sure to contain at least some genetically modified corn. U.S. Department of Agriculture figures for 2003 show that 40% of the U.S. corn crop was biotech, as were 81% of the soybeans and 73% of the cotton.

But when pollster told those who were surveyed the extent to which GM foods are already on store shelves ?and therefore that the respondents probably have been eating them ?attitudes changed. After learning that, 44% said GM foods are safe and 20% said they are unsafe.

"For consumers, biotechnology is not a high priority," says Stephanie Childs of the Grocery Manufacturers of America. "Knowing that it's on the market and it's regulated, they think, 'We have other things to be concerned about right now.' "

But one of the survey's strongest findings was that people support a more active role by the Food and Drug Administration role to ensure GM food safety. "More than half those surveyed said they'd be more likely to eat GM foods if the FDA had a mandatory regulatory process," says Michael Rodemeyer, Pew executive director.

James Maryanski, the FDA's biotechnology coordinator, says that although companies aren't required to send the FDA safety data on biotech foods, they are required to market safe and wholesome foods. "In other words, they're not able to just do whatever they want."

IFT HOLDS 3RD INTERNATIONAL FOOD SAFETY & QUALITY CONFERENCE & EXPO
November 5-7, 2003
Institute of Food Technologists
www.iftfoodsafety.com
On Nov. 5-7, 2003 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla.,
IFT will hold its third International Food Safety and Quality Conference and Expo. The conference will focus on the science of food from producer to
consumer. Addressing each facet of food safety from farm to table, the conference will provide a powerful forum for analysis of the issues and promote dialog about safety and quality among food-related professionals. Changes in government standards, growing awareness of food safety issues, and challenges impacting the food industry on a global scale all highlight the urgent need for real-world solutions to the unrelenting demand for a
safe, abundant food supply. A two-day Expo will feature exhibits designed to protect and ensure food safety and quality. Register today at
www.iftfoodsafety.com.

Current Foodborne Outbreaks
09/17. E. COLI O157, DAY CARE - UK (N. IRELAND)
09/17. Cryptosporidium Outbreak Continues to Grow
09/16. Restaurant to reopen after salmonella cases
09/16. Salmonella found in floor drain of Kennesaw restaurant
09/15. 300 FALL ILL FROM FREE FOOD AT BLOOD DONATION DRIVE IN INDIA
09/15. Most crypto cases at day cares
09/15. E.coli infects nine children
09/12. CONTAMINATED FOOD HAS LED TO PROBLEMS
09/12. 222 STUDENTS POISONED AT CHINESE MILITARY BASE

Current Recall Information
09/18. Kwong Wah Cake Has Recalled its "Pound Cake"
09/18. Bottled water recalled for caps
09/18. Danone Waters Announces Recall of Bottled Water Products
09/17. Update: Recall of AYLMER MEAT PACKERS INC. beef or beef products
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Eggs And Tree Nuts In Sesame
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Eggs In Apricot Cookies
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Eggs And Tree Nuts In Large
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Eggs And Tree Nuts In Hazelnut
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Eggs And Tree Nuts In Butter
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Eggs And Tree Nuts In Chinese
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Eggs And Tree Nuts In Almond
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Eggs And Dairy In Raisin Bread
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Dairy In Whole Wheat Bread
09/16. Fay Da Manufacturing Corp. Issues Alert On Undeclared Dairy In Pullman (White) Bread
09/15. [New Zealand] AL-RABIH HALAWA HALVA
09/15. Undeclared peanut protein in NAMJAI and COCK BRANDS CURRY PASTE
09/12. Undeclared peanut protein in NAMJAI and COCK BRANDS CURRY PASTE
09/12. Massachusetts Firm Recalls Meat And Poultry Products For Possible Listeria
09/11. California Firm Recalls Luncheon Meat For Possible Listeria Contamination
09/08. Update - Minister orders recall of AYLMER MEAT PACKERS INC. beef
09/07. Mandalay Trading Corporation Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Sulfites in Products
09/06. Illinois Firm Recalls Chili For Mislabeling

DUPONT QUALICON BAX SYSTEM ADOPTED AS AOAC OFFICIAL METHOD FOR DETECTING
LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES

September 16, 2003
DuPont Qualicon Press Release
WILMINGTON, Del. The BAXsystem, a genetics-based diagnostic tool from DuPont Qualicon, has been adopted by AOAC International as an Official MethodSM for detecting Listeria monocytogenes in food. This follows a similar action in July, when AOAC approved the BAX?system as an Official MethodSM for detecting Salmonella. AOAC International is a worldwide provider and facilitator in the development, use and harmonization of validated analytical methods. AOAC
Official MethodsSM are cited in the U.S. code of federal regulations and adopted by standards organizations around the world. The Official MethodsSM program (OMA) provides for multi-laboratory validation of a method where the
highest degree of confidence in performance is required to generate credible, defensible and reproducible results. The BAX?system for detecting Listeria monocytogenes was successfully validated and has been assigned AOAC Official MethodSM 2003.12. This esteemed recognition reinforces the confident results that food companies around the world have come to expect with the BAX?system,?said Kevin Huttman, president of DuPont Qualicon. As an AOAC Official MethodSM, the BAX?system continues its advance as the best available science-based tool of choice in food safety and brand protection programs.?br>Listeria monocytogenes is a harmful species of bacteria present in the environment and carried in healthy animals. The pathogen has been found in raw foods, such as unwashed vegetables and uncooked meats, as well as ready-to-eat foods that become contaminated after processing, especially deli meats and soft cheeses. Listeria monocytogenes spreads very easily by direct contact and, unlike most other bacteria, can grow slowly at
refrigerated temperatures. Consumption of food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes can cause
listeriosis, a potentially fatal disease in newborns, the elderly and persons with weakened immune systems. Pregnant women have an increased susceptibility to listeriosis, which can lead to miscarriage or stillbirth.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Listeria monocytogenes causes about 2,500 cases of listeriosis annually in the U.S., with a 20 percent fatality rate. The BAX?system uses advanced molecular technology to detect target bacteria in raw ingredients, finished food products and environmental samples. In addition to Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella, assays are also available for E.coli O157:H7, Genus Listeria and Enterobacter sakazakii. The automated system is user friendly and fits easily onto a laboratory bench top. Available since November 2000, hundreds of BAX?systems are already in use by governments, food companies and laboratories around the world.
In addition to the BAX?system, DuPont Qualicon markets the patented RiboPrinter?system, the only automated DNA fingerprinting instrument that rapidly pinpoints sources of bacteria in pharmaceuticals, personal care products and food. For more information, please visit www.qualicon.com.

Patent on contamination detector
Food Quality News
http://www.foodqualitynews.com/

12/09/03 - Food processors are constantly striving to keep the food supply safe by detecting contamination before it reaches consumers. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Athens, Georgia in the US, have been granted a patent on an imaging system they claim could be a more reliable method of scanning food surfaces to detect contaminants.

Using a real-time imaging system in the processing plant, a team of researchers, led by Bob Windham at the ARS Poultry Processing and Meat Quality Research Unit, said they were able to detect faeces and recently ingested materials on animal carcasses with 100 per cent accuracy.
The system uses hyperspectral imaging to scan the surface of a poultry carcass, locating hard-to-detect material such as small particles or those in shadowed areas. This detection system could more reliably detect potential food safety contaminants, reducing processing delays and saving processors money, say the scientists.

While the system has the potential for use in many processing situations for the detection of surface contaminants, it has so far only been tested on poultry. However, because the system is expected to work with other animal carcasses, a broad patent application has been filed covering a wide range of poultry and meat products.

An on-line prototype was used to test the system that operates at 140 birds per minute, approximating the processing speeds used in US poultry plants. The researchers expect the system to work at 180 birds per minute, the maximum European line speed, but have no data at this time to predict its efficacy at that speed.

A co-operative research and development agreement was established with Stork Gamco, Gainesville, Georgia, to develop and test a prototype on-line system.

Irradiation: Right-to-Know
source from :
Food Production Daily
http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/news/news.asp?id=3468

18/09/03 - A US politician is trying to push through a bill in the US senate which will allow for a clear labelling policy on irradiation in the National School Lunch Programme. Representative Barbara Lee has said that she will sponsor a right-to-know bill on irradiated food in an attempt to give parents and children the opportunity of whether or not to choose irradiated foods.
Advocacy group Public Citizen described Lees efforts as a giant step forward for consumers in the emerging public debate about irradiation.
If passed, the bill would mandate the distribution of balanced information about irradiated foods used in school lunch programmes, requiring all irradiated food to be clearly labeled.
Current regulations in the US state that irradiated food do not need to be labelled if served in schools, hospitals or restaurants.Therefore, children and their parents will not know if the food served on school lunch trays has been irradiated. Rep. Lee's bill seeks to change that, and rightfully so. It is vital for parents to know what their children are eating. They deserve balanced information not slick industry propaganda about what irradiation does to food,a spokesperson from Public Citizen said.
The advocacy group also highlighted studies which show significant opposition to irradiated food and concern about the lack of labelling for it. One group that has had reservations about food irradiation is women with school-age children. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) held six focus groups during the summer of 2001 in which consumers were asked their opinions of labeling for irradiated foods. In its report to Congress, the FDA stated that, "Everyone agreed that irradiated foods should be labled honestly."As the bill moves through congress it will be closely observed on both sides of the Atlantic. In the US the industry is already firmly established, but in Europe tougher legislation largely outlaws the irradiation of foods. However, the outcome of the bill would undoubtedly have a bearing on future legislation over food irradiation on a global basis.

Current Food Safety Informaiton
09/18. FIRST RANGE OF FOOD SAFETY ADVICE FOR FARMERS: GOOD FARM PRA
09/18. CLEAN PLANTS, HEALTHY ANIMALS: FARM-BASED SOLUTIONS TO FOOD
09/18. MEAT INSPECTION FIASCO THREATENS FAMILY FARMS AND CONSUMER C
09/18. IFT HOLDS 3RD INTERNATIONAL FOOD SAFETY & QUALITY CONFERENCE
09/18. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION (NEHA) 2003 CONFER
09/18. ANNUAL RESEARCH MEETING ANNOUNCED
09/18. EARTHY-SMELLING WATER REMAINS SAFE TO DRINK
09/18. Americans are iffy on genetically modified foods
09/18. [Singapore] Stricter standards for food factories
09/18. Public Sentiment About Genetically Modified Food
09/18. FDA warns milk producers on "Hormone Free" claims
09/18. Struggling SureBeam names new CEO
09/18. FSA open for discussion
09/18. Danisco¡¯s unique food safety product range
09/18. Irradiation: Right-to-Know
09/18. Scientists continue to question Chinese herbals
09/18. New study links antacids with increased risk of food allergy
09/18. Italy reports another case of mad cow disease
09/18. Seattle company's water purifier to aid U.S. forces
09/18. R U Sick of Bureaucracy?
09/18. USDA: Testing cuts E. coli woes
09/18. Tainted E. Coli Ground Beef Samples Fall
09/18. USDA CONSUMER ALERT Keeping Food Safe During An Emergency
09/18. FDA Offers Food Safety Information for Expected Power Outages and Flooding
09/18. Food Safety in a Disaster
09/18. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)

09/17. ONTARIO FOOD PROTECTION ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING
09/17. FIRST TIME STUDENTS CAN NO LONGER RELY ON MAMMY'S COOKING
09/17. SAFETY OF FOOD PRODUCTS
09/17. [UK] METALS IN INFANT FOODS NO CAUSE FOR CONCERN
09/17. THE FSIS REORGANIZATION
09/17. FOOD ASSURANCE FIRM TO ANNOUNCE ITS FORMATION IN WASHINGTON
09/17. FSIS PRE-HARVEST E. COLI O157:H7 SYMPOSIUM
09/17. ANOTHER US AIRPORT TRAVEL HAZARD ¡© DIRTY HANDS
09/17. OPP SETS UP HOTLINE FOR AYLMER INVESTIGATION
09/17. THAILAND: Thailand moves to ban pesticides
09/17. FoodTrace from farm to fork
09/17. Banned jelly sweets unearthed in UK
09/17. Scientists appointed to Europe's new food safety body
09/17. Food Security
09/17. Consumers unaware of drug/herb interactions
09/17. More Maine schools put the kibosh on peanuts
09/17. Rise in peanut allergies changes norms from kindergarten to
09/17. Schools ask, 'Is peanut butter worth the risk?'

09/16. [India] JPC to cover liquor, bottled water
09/16. Cell phones fingered for germ spread
09/16. Imported seafood goes untested
09/16. Perlegen Awarded NIH Biodefense Grant for Comparative Salmonella
09/16. Canning proves its worth when weather turns cold
09/16. Supreme Court refuses to review decision in E. coli lawsuits
09/16. [Ireland] Foodstall closed down by food authority
09/16. [South Africa] Practical implications for food industry
09/16. Eves admits safety warnings not a priority
09/16. System operators to receive less training than before Walkerton
09/16. Four states sue EPA over pesticide residue levels in food -
09/16. State Says EPA Allowing Dangerous Amounts Of Harmful Pestici
09/16. Study affirms meat supply safety
09/16. [WHO] Food Safety
09/16. Ice cubes 'harbour toilet bugs'
09/16. System traces beef back to farm

09/15. [UK] [FSA] BOARD MEETING UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2003
09/15. PROVISION OF SCIENTIFIC ADVICE TO CODEX - ELECTRONIC FORUM
09/15. TORONTO -- THE N-D-P IS CALLING ON PREMIER ERNIE EVES TO ISS
09/15. AUDITOR PROBES MEAT CONCERNS; SECOND LOOK AT FOOD MINISTRY I
09/15. ALASKA REGULATORS CONSIDER PLAN TO REQUIRE RESTAURANT INSPEC
09/15. FDA WARNS MILK MANUFACTURERS ON HORMONE LABEL
09/15. House specialty was dirty dining

09/14. Acrylamide in focus
09/14. More peanut allergies showing up at colleges
09/14. Eatery tested for salmonella
09/14. Ask The Critic: Take foodborne illness seriously
09/14. FSAI launches new guide for food business

09/13. [Japan] Govt to ban beef on the bone to prevent BSE transmis
09/13. Inspectors seek support for modernized meat safety system
09/13. Restaurants feel violated
09/13. Mexican Village Plays Host to Fight Over Genetically Modifie

JOB Information
9/15 Senior management position, HACCP (Ellisonmeat Co.)
9/14 Laboratory Manager (Koch Foods, Inc.)
9/14 Quality Assurance Supervisor (Koch Foods, Inc.)

Food Safety for Your Family
Tue Sep 9, 8:00 PM ET
KidsHealth.org
In Yahoo! Health
http://story.news.yahoo.com/
You probably have lots of concerns about the foods you give to your child. Is it a nutritious meal? Will he eat it? Is there too much fat? But one thing that may not cross your mind as you're slicing and dicing in the kitchen is food safety.Why is food safety important? And how can you be sure your kitchen and the foods you prepare in it are safe? Keep reading to find out.
Why Food Safety Is Important
Proper food preparations are necessary to prevent the spread of bacteria, such as E. coli, and foodborne illnesses, such as salmonellosis, campylobacter infections , and listeriosis. These preparations include knowing how to select foods in the grocery store, how to store them in your kitchen, and how to clean your kitchen.
In the Grocery Store
The grocery store is your first stop on the way to food safety. To ensure the freshness of your refrigerated items (meat, dairy, eggs, and fish, for example), put these in your cart last. If your drive home is longer than 1 hour, you might want to consider putting these items in a cooler to keep them fresh.
When purchasing packaged meat, poultry, or fish, be sure to check the expiration date on the label. Even if the expiration date is still acceptable, don't buy fish or meats that have any unusual odors or look strange. Ground beef should be red, not any shade of brown; a whole fish is fresh when its eyes are clear, not milky. In the refrigerator, put meat, poultry, and fish in separate plastic bags so that their juices do not get on your other foods. It's also important to check inside egg cartons. You should make sure the eggs, which should be grade A or AA, are clean and free from cracks.

Don't buy:
fruit with broken skin (bacteria can enter through the opening in the skin and contaminate the fruit)
unpasteurized ciders or juices (they can contain harmful bacteria)
prestuffed turkeys or chickens

In the Kitchen
Before you put the groceries away, check the temperature of your refrigerator and freezer. Your refrigerator should be set for 40 degrees Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius), and your freezer should be set to 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-18 degrees Celsius) or lower. These chilly temperatures will help keep any bacteria in your foods from multiplying.


The first items you should put away are those that belong in the refrigerator and freezer. Keep eggs in the original carton on a shelf in your refrigerator (most refrigerator doors do not keep eggs cold enough).


Raw meat, poultry, or fish should be cooked or frozen within 2 days. Raw ground meats can be stored in the freezer for a maximum of 4 months; cooked meats can be frozen for a maximum of 3 months.


It's important to refrigerate any leftovers as soon as possible after cooking. If left to sit at room temperature, bacteria in the food will multiply quickly. To facilitate the cooling process, you might want to divide the leftovers into smaller containers. Also, remove stuffing from poultry after cooking and store separately in the refrigerator. Consume leftovers within 3 to 5 days or throw them out.


Follow these handling and cooking guidelines to prevent foodborne illness in your family:

thaw meat, poultry, and fish in the refrigerator or microwave, never at room temperature
cook thawed meat, poultry, and fish immediately
throw away any leftover uncooked meat, poultry, or fish marinades
cook meat until the center is no longer pink and the juices run clear
cook crumbled ground beef or poultry until it's no longer pink
use a meat thermometer to tell whether meats are cooked thoroughly - most thermometers indicate at which temperature the type of meat is safely cooked, or you can refer to the recommendations below (place thermometer in the thickest portion of the meat and away from bones or fat)
scrub all fruits and vegetables with plain water to remove any pesticide residue or dirt
remove the outer leaves of leafy greens, such as spinach or lettuce